When Cinderella's cruel stepmother prevents her from attending the Royal Ball, she gets some unexpected help from the lovable mice Gus and Jaq, and from her Fairy Godmother.

Writers:

Charles Perrault (from the original classic by), Bill Peet (story) (as William Peed) | 7 more credits »
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4,037 ( 477)
Nominated for 3 Oscars. Another 6 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Ilene Woods ... Cinderella (voice)
Eleanor Audley ... Lady Tremaine (voice)
Verna Felton ... Fairy Godmother (voice)
Claire Du Brey ... (as Claire DuBrey) (credit only)
Rhoda Williams Rhoda Williams ... Drizella (voice)
James MacDonald James MacDonald ... Jaq / Gus (voice) (as James Macdonald)
Helene Stanley ... (credit only)
Luis Van Rooten Luis Van Rooten ... King / Grand Duke (voice)
Don Barclay ... Doorman (voice)
Lucille Bliss ... Anastasia (voice)
Jeffrey Stone ... (voice) (as John Fontaine)
Mike Douglas ... Prince Charming (singing voice)
William Phipps ... Prince Charming (voice)
Marion Darlington Marion Darlington ... Birds (voice)
Earl Keen Earl Keen ... Bruno (voice)
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Storyline

Cinderella, the beautiful and kind-hearted daughter, sees her world turn upside down when her beloved mother dies, and her pained father remarries another woman, the wicked Lady Tremaine, who has two equally cruel daughters, the jealous Anastasia and Drizella. But, once more, things will go from bad to worse, When Cinderella's father, too, dies, leaving her all alone in the Lady's clutches to serve as her maid-of-all-work. Under those circumstances, a shabby and neglected Cinderella doesn't stand much of a chance of attending the King's royal ball--let alone, captivate the handsome Prince--unless she turns to her loving Fairy Godmother who has quite a few tricks up her sleeve. Nevertheless, will the wronged damsel ever find peace--and with it--her own Prince Charming ? Written by Nick Riganas

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo... It's FUN! It's MAGIC! (1973 re-release) See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

According to Marc Davis, one of the directing animators of this film, at least 90% of the movie was done in live action model before animation. Dancer Ward Ellis was the live action model for Prince Charming. Cinderella's carriage is actually a live-action model painted white with black lines; this was the first time this technique had actually been used. See more »

Goofs

(at around 5 mins) In the morning while Cinderella is singing, Jaq is sitting on the headboard of the bed, then once the palace clock chimes Jaq is at the foot of the bed. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Narrator: Once upon a time in a faraway land, there was a tiny kingdom; peaceful, prosperous, and rich in romance and tradition. Here in a stately chateau, there lived a widowed gentleman, and his little daughter, Cinderella. Although he was a kind and devoted father, and gave his beloved child every luxury and comfort, still, he felt she needed a mother's care. And so he married again, choosing for his second wife, a woman of good family, with two daughters just Cinderella's age, by name, ...
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Crazy Credits

In lieu of a cast list, the opening credits specify "with the talents of" followed by nine names: Ilene Woods, Eleanor Audley, Verna Felton, Claire Du Brey, Rhoda Williams, James MacDonald, Helene Stanley, Luis Van Rooten, and Don Barclay. However, only seven of these persons provided voices for the animated characters (according to studio records) and are listed in the cast. Both Stanley and Du Brey were live action models to help the artists animate the humans. They were placed in the miscellaneous section. See more »

Alternate Versions

In the 1988 video, instead of the original RKO logo, the film opens with the complete Walt Disney Pictures logo, with the Walt Disney Pictures theme replacing part of the title song. For the 1995 video, the portion of the song was restored, but a Buena Vista credit replaced the RKO logo. (The 1995 laserdisc used the original RKO logo; the familiar blue logo appears before and after the film, but not replacing any part. In the 2012 Blu-Ray/DVD, the familiar blue logo wasn't used at all and the original RKO logo was restored.) For the 2005 DVD, the movie opens with a shortened Walt Disney Pictures logo accompanied by the part of the song that played with the RKO logo. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Iceman (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

A Dream Is a Wish Your Heart Makes
(1949) (uncredited)
Music and Lyrics by Mack David, Jerry Livingston, and Al Hoffman
Performed by Ilene Woods
Reprised by the mice as they are working on Cinderella's dress for the ball.
Reprised by the Jud Conlon Chorus in the finale
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User Reviews

 
A success, on the whole
12 August 1999 | by SpleenSee all my reviews

People criticise Disney's animated features of the 1950s for being overly glossy, set in landscapes that are much too pristine. That criticism is just. And yet it can't be the whole story, because the two least glossy - "Alice in Wonderland" and "Peter Pan" - are also the weakest. "Cinderella", on the other hand, set in a world in which the very dirt sparkles, is clearly the best.

It DOES look good. The backgrounds are subtle and consistent; the colours are pure without being too bright. The animation varies a bit. I'll swear that some of the humans are rotoscoped - but then, the rotoscoped humans (including Cinderella herself) aren't full-blooded characters in the script, so this approach works well enough. It's really the animals that make the movie. I think the studio had never quite used animals in this way before, as totems rather than sidekicks. The mice, for instance, are the creatures who draw us into the story; but they are really representatives or allies of the more colourless Cinderella. The cat, Lucifer, is a kind of witch's familiar to the Wicked Stepmother. (The cat is brilliantly conceived and animated - one of the best feline creations of all time. The supervising animator was Ward Kimball and he modelled it on his own cat. I wonder how he put up with the animal.) This approach allows the animals to steal the show without drawing our attention from the main story. Their actions are of maximum interest only in the light of the main story.

Among the supporting cast the notable humans are the King and the Grand Duke. The King is a one note character - he wants grandchildren and appears to have no other desires at all - but the note is struck in a pleasing fashion. The Grand Duke is a put-upon character who deserves to be lifted out of his sphere as much as Cinderella does. (Although he, of course, is richer.)

"Cinderella" is Disney's return to features after an eight-year hiatus, and neither with it nor with any subsequent movie would he recapture the raw brilliance of his early years. Moreover he made things hard for himself by picking "Cinderella". She's a passive heroine and there's not much anyone can do about that. (Maybe I'm wrong on this score - I haven't seen the recent "Ever After".) Nonetheless it is remarkable how successful Disney was in bringing this unpromising story to life, without cutting across the grain of its spirit.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

4 March 1950 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

La cenicienta See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$2,900,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$1,300,000, 20 December 1981

Gross USA:

$93,141,149

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$96,383,330
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound System)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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