6.8/10
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3 user

The Blonde Bandit (1950)

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(story and screenplay)
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Cast

Credited cast:
... Gloria Dell
... Joe Sapelli
... Dist. Atty. James Deveron
Charles Cane ... Police Lt. Ralph Metzger
... Police Capt. Ed Roberts
... Mama Sapelli
Richard Irving ... Benny
... Artie Jerome
Alex Frazer ... Charles Winters
Ted Jacques ... Bartender
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
... Police Chief Ramsey
... Mrs. Henley
... Gus (Bookmaker)
... Police Lt. O'Connor
Walter Clinton ... Waiter
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Storyline

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Taglines:

SOCK DRAMA!...of suspense and violence in a vice-ridden city! (original window card)

Genres:

Action | Crime | Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

11 January 1950 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Parceira no Jogo  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Connections

Referenced in The Silence of the Lambs (1991) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Crime & Romance
14 August 2001 | by See all my reviews

A nice little item from 1950, the movie tells the tale of a good girl who does some bad things who gets involved with a bad guy quite capable of doing good things. The plot is nicely developed for a Republic B, and the lead actors, Gerald Mohr and Dorothy Patrick, are surprisingly effective. Mohr is particularly good in the sort of Bogart role he could obviously handle quite well but was scarcely ever permitted to do. For once he is well cast.

The film has at times deeper emotional qualities than its makers perhaps realized at the time. For all the plot machinations one comes to care a good deal for the two major characters. As their story unfolds their romance is so credible that the movie seems to have gone from being a crime picture to a romance. Most crime films have some romantic interludes in them, but The Blonde Bandit is so carried away by them that it becomes, for a while, another kind of movie altogether. When it reverts, in the end, to its generic form, one is almost as heartbroken as the fictional characters over what has become of them.


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