The Baron of Arizona (1950) - News Poster

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Happy Birthday Vincent Price! A Look Back at Vincentennial

Today is Vincent Price’s 104th Birthday! Price was born here in St. Louis on this date in 1911 and is the most iconic movie star to hail from our city. Price, who died October 25th 1993, was also a gourmand, author, stage actor, speaker, world-class art collector, raconteur, and all-around Renaissance man. Vincent Price was simply one of the most remarkable people of the 20th Century. Four years ago we had the opportunity to celebrate his 100th birthday and St. Louis was the place to do it. I teamed up with Cinema St. Louis to present Vincentennial, The Vincent Price 100th Birthday Celebration, an event that lasted through much of the Spring of 2011. The following year Vincentennial won two coveted Rondo Awards, one for “Best Fan Event” and a second for myself as “Monster Kid of the Year” for directing the event. The Rondo Awards are prestigious Fan Awards given out
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

TCM Salutes Vincent Price In October With A Month-Long Film Fest

TCM devotes Thursday nights in October to Vincent Price, the versatile actor whose career lasted more than five decades and extended far beyond the horror films for which he was best known.

The chronological lineup includes such classics as The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex (1939), The Three Musketeers (1948) and While the City Sleeps (1956).

And on Oct. 23 and Oct. 31, Price’s talents in the horror genre are on full display in 17 films, just in time for Halloween.

Thursday, Oct. 3

8 p.m. – The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex (1939)

10 p.m. – Leave Her to Heaven (1945)

Midnight – The Keys of the Kingdom (1945)

2:30 a.m. – The Three Musketeers (1948)

5:15 a.m. – The Bribe (1949)

7 a.m. – The Long Night (1947)

Thursday, Oct. 10

8 p.m. – The Baron of Arizona (1950)

9:45 p.m. – His Kind of Woman (1951)

Midnight – The Las Vegas Story (1952)

1:30 a.m. – Dangerous Mission (1954)

3 a.m. – Son of Sinbad (1955)

4:45 a.m. – Serenade (1956)

Thursday,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Vincentennial Nominated for a Rondo Award for Best Fan Event

Vincentennial, the Vincent Price 100th Birthday Celebration, which took place here in St. Louis last Spring and was covered in depth at We Are Movie Geeks, has been nominated for a Rondo Award for “Best Fan Event”. Now in their tenth year, The Rondo Awards are prestigious Fan Awards given out annually for the year’s best horror-related stuff–movies, magazines,articles, toys, etc. The Rondos are completely fan-based; nominees are selected by horror film fans and focus specifically on the horror genre. The awards are debated at The Classic Horror Film Board and presented at the Wonderfest Hobby Expo in May in Louisville, Ky. The awards are named for Rondo Hatton, the 1940′s-era character actor whose glandular disease resulted in a misshapen face and brutish appearance (an article I wrote for Wamg about Mr. Hatton can be found Here)

The Rondos have 31 categories covering all aspects of film and the horror genre in general,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Sliff 2011: The St. Louis International Film Festival Begins This Week

The 20th Annual Stella Artois St. Louis International Film Festival (better known to local movie buffs as Sliff) is presented by Cinema St. Louis and begins this Thursday, November 10th. The fest looks like another exciting event for film buffs. Now in its 20th year, Sliff is one of the largest international film festivals in the Midwest. This year’s event will be held Nov. 10-20. Sliff’s main venues are the Tivoli Theatre, Plaza Frontenac Cinema, and Webster University’s Winifred Moore Auditorium with additional screenings at the Wildey Theater in Edwardsville, Il, and Brown Hall on the campus of Washington University. Sliff showcases the best in cutting-edge features and shorts from around the globe. The majority of the more than 300 films screened – many of them critically lauded award-winners will receive their only St. Louis exposure at the festival. We Are Movie Geeks.com will be posting reviews of
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Vincentennial: Champagne For Caesar and Baron Of Arizona Tonight

Champagne For Caesar will play at the Vincentennial Vincent Price Film Festival in a 35mm print at 7:00pm tonight, Tuesday, May 24th at Brown Hall on the campus of Washington University followed by The Baron Of Arizona at 9:15. With introductions and a post-film discussion of .Champagne for Caesar. by Washington U. film & media lecturer Hunter Vaughan. Admission is free.

Many works of fiction have been said to be ahead of their time. In the world of motions pictures few are more prophetic than the 1950 comedy classic Champagne For Caesar. By that year, mind you, quiz shows were popular on radio and that young upstart television, but by the end of the decade these programs would inspire a national craze ( and a scandal later depicted in Robert Redford’s film Quiz Show ). Caesar foreshadows all this while showcasing some delightful performances by actors generally not known for big screen comedies.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Vincentennial- A Festival that Honors a True Horror Legend

All this month, St. Louis will be hosting the 100th birthday celebration of genre legend Vincent Price, Vincentennial! There are some great flicks showing during the film festival which begins this Thursday, May 19th. The majority of the screenings feature 35mm prints of the film along with pre-film or post film discussions with historians, professors, and film experts. In conjunction with Cinema St. Louis,Vincentennial will also feature special guests including Roger Corman, Victoria Price, Tim Lucas and more! Read beyond the break for the complete schedule.

Born in St. Louis on May 27, 1911, actor and all around “renaissance man” Vincent Price is a legend among Hollywood actors and among residents here in St. Louis. The actor retained a special fondness for his hometown over the years, even after his eventual success in show-business. Though the actor did a variety of films over his 55 year long career, it is his series of films,
See full article at Destroy the Brain »

Film composer Paul Dunlap dies at 90

Paul Dunlap, a prolific film composer for three decades and a frequent collaborator of Sam Fuller, died March 11 in Palm Springs. He was 90.The classically trained Dunlap composed the soundtracks for more than 133 films and TV shows and worked on another 50 pictures and television episodes as a conductor, musical director, music supervisor and orchestrator, often composing incidental music as well.Dunlap worked with fiery writer-director Fuller on such films as "The Baron of Arizona" (1950), starring Vincent Price, "The Steel Helmet" (1951), "Park Row" (1952), "Shock Corridor" (1963) and "The Naked Kiss" (1964).He also wrote the soundtracks for six movies directed by Harold D. Schuster, including the Western "Jack Slade" (1953), and worked on numerous TV shows, including "Have Gun, Will Travel." He was admired for his Western scores and sci-fi sound effects.A native of Springfield, Ohio, Dunlap also worked
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Aip Composer Paul Dunlap Dies

Paul Dunlap was a prolific film composer in the 1950s and 1960s, scoring over 200 features. He was best known for providing themes and scores for numerous science fiction and horror thrillers of the decades. His music highlighted attacks by prehistoric beasts in 1951’s Lost Continent starring Cesar Romero, and an alien robot invasion in 1954’s Target Earth with Richard Denning and Kathleen Crowley. He scored Michael Landon’s transformation from man to monster in I Was a Teenage Werewolf (1957), and provided music for such other Aip and United/Allied Artist cult classics as I Was a Teenage Frankenstein (1957), Blood of Dracula (1957), How to Make a Monster (1958), Frankenstein – 1970 (1958), Invisible Invaders (1959), The Four Skulls of Jonathan Drake (1959), Angry Red Planet (1959), Shock Corridor (1963), and Black Zoo (1963).

Dunlap was born in Springfield, Ohio, on July 19, 1919. He began working in films in the early 1950s, scoring westerns, war and action films including The Baron of Arizona
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

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