A seemingly timid but secretly ruthless ingénue insinuates herself into the lives of an aging Broadway star and her circle of theater friends.

Writer:

Joseph L. Mankiewicz (written for the screen by)
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Popularity
3,540 ( 929)
Top Rated Movies #135 | Won 6 Oscars. Another 20 wins & 18 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Bette Davis ... Margo
Anne Baxter ... Eve
George Sanders ... Addison DeWitt
Celeste Holm ... Karen
Gary Merrill ... Bill Simpson
Hugh Marlowe ... Lloyd Richards
Gregory Ratoff ... Max Fabian
Barbara Bates ... Phoebe
Marilyn Monroe ... Miss Casswell
Thelma Ritter ... Birdie
Walter Hampden ... Aged Actor
Randy Stuart ... Girl
Craig Hill ... Leading Man
Leland Harris Leland Harris ... Doorman
Barbara White Barbara White ... Autograph Seeker
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Storyline

Eve Harrington (Anne Baxter) is waiting backstage to meet her idol, talented but aging Broadway star Margo Channing (Bette Davis). It seems innocent enough as Eve explains that she has seen Margo in EVERY performance of her current play. Margo and her friends take Eve under their wing but only theatre critic Addison DeWitt (George Sanders) sees through Eve's evil plan, which is to take Margo's parts and her fiancé, Bill Simpson (Gary Merrill) too.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

It's all about women---and their men!

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The popular English gothic rock band All About Eve took their name from the film. They enjoyed chart success in the UK in the late 1980s and early 1990s with several hit singles such as "Martha's Harbour" and "What Kind of Fool". See more »

Goofs

In the dressing-room scene at the beginning, Margot turns in her chair to look at Karen. In the subsequent reverse angle, her arm positioning across the back of the chair has completely changed. See more »

Quotes

Bill Sampson: [to Eve] "Don't let it worry you", said the camera man, "Even DeMille couldn't see anything looking through the wrong end!" So that was the first and last...
Margo: [entering] Don't let me kill the point. Or isn't it a story for grownups?
Bill Sampson: You've heard it - about the time I looked into the wrong end of the camera finder.
Margo: Remind me to tell you about the time I looked into the heart of an artichoke.
Eve: I'd like to hear it.
Margo: Some snowy night, in front of the fire.
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Crazy Credits

The film opens straightaway with its own theme, without the ubiquitous "Fox Fanfare". See more »

Connections

Referenced in Mork & Mindy: Mork Gets Mindy-itis (1979) See more »

Soundtracks

Liebestraum
(1850) (uncredited)
Music by Franz Liszt
Played on the piano at the party when Margo is sitting with the pianist
Also heard on the car radio
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User Reviews

 
Incredible
29 August 2000 | by smartbombSee all my reviews

I had read comments about the quality of the writing in this film but I really had no idea to what extent this would elevate the experience. The fact is, it leaves me with no other choice than to give it a perfect 10. Unless you see this film, I don't think you'll have the necessary frame of reference with which to to base any expectations on. It's an incredibly engrossing, moving and often comedic experience, but time and time again what knocks you over is the absolute finesse with which this script was crafted. The fact that the acting and direction are flawless and surprisingly natural-seeming (most old movies usually seem stiff or people seem to "act" too much) only enhances it that much more. With this film, you can really imagine the *people* the actors are portraying.

"All About Eve" shows some similarity to one of my other favourite 50s films "A Face in the Crowd". Both are studies of fame and celebrity. Eve shows how a person will corrupt themselves in order to attain it, whereas A Face's premise is that fame corrupts those who find themselves in the spotlight. Both have themes that are perhaps even more resonant in our celebrity-obsessed culture now than when they were made. Interestingly, Eve predates A Face by several years.

And possibly most interesting of all is the honest and often raw way in which women are portrayed, the strength of their character and the power they wield. The male contingent is practically relegated to the back seat. One might be hard pressed to find a movie quite so "liberated" today. So what more can I say? If you love movies and you haven't yet seen it, you've suffered long enough; don't wait another day.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

27 October 1950 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Best Performance See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,400,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$10,177, 8 October 2000

Gross USA:

$63,463

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$151,052
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Twentieth Century Fox See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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