Lost Boundaries (1949) - News Poster

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He Walked by Night

Do you think older crime thrillers weren’t violent enough? This shocker from 1948 shook up America with its true story of a vicious killer who has a murderous solution to every problem, and uses special talents to evade police detection. Richard Basehart made his acting breakthrough as Roy Martin, a barely disguised version of the real life ‘Machine Gun Walker.

He Walked by Night

Blu-ray

ClassicFlix

1948 / B&W /1:37 flat full frame / 79 min. / Street Date November 7, 2017 / 39.99

Starring: Richard Basehart, Scott Brady, Roy Roberts, Whit Bissell, James Cardwell, Jack Webb, Dorothy Adams, Ann Doran, Byron Foulger, Reed Hadley (narrator), Thomas Browne Henry, Tommy Kelly, John McGuire, Kenneth Tobey.

Cinematography: John Alton

Art Direction: Edward Ilou

Film Editor: Alfred De Gaetano

Original Music: Leonid Raab

Written by John C. Higgins and Crane Wilbur

Produced by Bryan Foy, Robert T. Kane

Directed by Alfred L. Werker

Talk about a movie with a dynamite
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Wait Until Dark

Is this a genuine classic? I think so. Sure, it’s the old story of the blind girl in jeopardy, but it’s been worked out so well. Audrey Hepburn, Alan Arkin, Richard Crenna and Jack Weston shine in a keen adaptation of Frederick Knott’s play, which could be titled, Dial C for Can’t See Nuthin’.

Wait Until Dark

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1967 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 108 min. / Street Date January 24, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring Audrey Hepburn, Alan Arkin, Richard Crenna, Efrem Zimbalist Jr., Jack Weston, Julie Herrod, Samantha Jones.

Cinematography Charles Lang

Art Direction George Jenkins

Film Editor Gene Milford

Original Music Henry Mancini

Written by Robert Howard-Carrington & Jane Howard-Carrington

from the play by Frederick Knott

Produced by Mel Ferrer

Directed by Terence Young

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

This old-fashioned, semi- stage bound thriller is a real keeper: I must have seen it six times
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Pioneers of African-American Cinema

It's arrived -- thanks in part to a successful Kickstarter campaign, this nearly comprehensive compendium of American 'Race Films' is here in a deluxe Blu-ray presentation. Pioneers of African-American Cinema Blu-ray Kino Classics 1915-1946 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 952 min. / Street Date July 26, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 99.95 Directed by Richard Norman, Richard Maurice, Spencer Williams and Oscar Micheaux

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Black Cinema History? We didn't hear a peep about any such thing back in film school. Sometime in the 1980s PBS would broadcast a barely watchable (see sample just below) copy of a creaky silent 'race movie' about a 'backsliding' black man in trouble with the law, the Lord and his wife in that order. The cultural segregation has been almost complete. It wasn't until even later that I read articles about a long-extinct nationwide circuit of movie theaters catering to black audiences, wherever the populations were big enough to support the trade.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Private Affairs of Bel Ami

Cad, bounder, dastard... look those words up in an old casting directory and you'll probably find a picture of George Sanders. Albert Lewin's best movie is a class-act period piece with terrific acting from Sanders, Angela Lansbury, Ann Dvorak, John Carradine, Warren William and many more, and a powerful '40s picture that most people haven't discovered, now handsomely restored. The Private Affairs of Bel Ami Blu-ray Olive Films 1947 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 112 min. / Street Date May 24, 2016 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.95 Starring George Sanders, Angela Lansbury, Ann Dvorak, John Carradine, Warren William, Susan Douglas, Albert Bassermann, Frances Dee, Marie Wilson, Katherine Emery, Richard Fraser. Cinematography Russell Metty Film Editor Joseph Albrecht Original Music Darius Milhaud Assistant Director Robert Aldrich Production Design Gordon Wiles Written by from the novel by Guy de Maupassant Produced by David L. Loew Written Directed by Albert Lewin

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson
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Losing Ground

Kathleen Collins' name made a big cultural rebound with a single review in The New Yorker -- of an independent movie she wrote and directed in 1982. It's a confluence of important black theater and filmmaking talent -- Collins, Bill Gunn, Duane Jones, Billie Allen and, in the background, William Greaves and the history of film generated by African-Americans. Losing Ground Blu-ray The Milestone Cinematheque 1982 / Color / 1:37 Academy / 86 min. / Available at Milestone Films / Street Date April 5, 2016 / 39.99 Starring Seret Scott, Bill Gunn, Duane Jones, Billie Allen, Maritza Rivera, Noberto Kerner, Gary Bolling, Michelle Mais. Cinematography Ronald K. Gray Film Editor Ronald K. Gray, Kathleen Collins Original Music Michael Minard Produced by Kathleen Collins, Ronald K. Gray Written and Directed by Kathleen Collins

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Quick, name five film directors that are black women. Well, after seeing the glowing review for Losing Ground late last year in The New Yorker,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Agonies of "Passing" - Considering the Murder Mystery 'Sapphire'

Starting in the late 1940’s, and continuing through to the end of the ‘50’s, Hollywood seemed to be obsessed with the concept of “passing” - light skinned black people passing for white. Though it wasn’t new, of course, somehow it caught Tinseltown’s attention and a slew of films were made, almost all them dealing with women in particular, who passed for white, and the tragedies and sorrow that they encountered. Elia Kazan’s "Pinky," "Lost Boundaries," "Imitation Of Life," "Band of Angels," "The Night of the Quarter Moon," "I Passed for White," and the would-be "Gone with the Wind" rip-off, "Raintree...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

The Agonies Of "Passing" - Considering the Murder Mystery 'Sapphire'

Starting in the late 1940’s, and continuing through to the end of the ‘50’s, Hollywood seemed to be obsessed with the concept of “passing” - light skinned black people passing for white. Though it wasn’t new, of course, somehow it caught Tinseltown’s attentionm and a slew of films were made, almost all them dealing with women in particular, who passed for white and the tragedies and sorrow that they encountered. Elia Kazan’s "Pinky," "Lost Boundaries," "Imitation Of Life," "Band of Angels," "The Night of the Quarter Moon," "I Passed for White," and the would-be "Gone with the Wind" rip-off, "Raintree...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Rare Screening Of 40's Mexican "Mulatto Angst" Film 'Angelitos Negros' In Long Beach

As I always say, you learn something new every day, even me. And I admit that I had never heard of this film until recently, and I'm really intrigued to see it. I'm referring to the 1948 Mexican film, Angelitos Negros (Back Angels), written and directed by Joselito Rodriguez, which, in effect, was Mexican cinema's addition to the, what I like to call, "mulatto angst" movies popular during the the late 1940's into the 1950's, such as Lost Boundaries, Raintree County, Pinky, Kings Go Forth, Night of the Quarter Moon and Raoul Walsh's Band of Angels (maybe the best of the "angst" lot) with Clark Gable, Yvonne De Carlo...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

DGA Awards vs. Academy Awards: Odd Men Out George Cukor, John Huston, Vincente Minnelli

Linda Darnell, Ann Sothern, Jeanne Crain, A Letter to Three Wives DGA Awards vs. Academy Awards Pt.2: Foreign, Small, Controversial Movies Have Better Luck at the Oscars Since pre-1970 Directors Guild Award finalists often consisted of more than five directors, it was impossible to get an exact match for the DGA's and the Academy's lists of nominees. In the list below, the years before 1970 include DGA finalists (DGA) who didn't receive an Academy Award nod and, if applicable, those Academy Award-nominated directors (AMPAS) not found in the — usually much lengthier — DGA list. The label "DGA/AMPAS" means the directors in question received nominations for both the DGA Award and the Academy Award. The DGA Awards vs. Academy Awards list below goes from 1948 (the DGA Awards' first year) to 1952. Follow-up posts will cover the ensuing decades. The number in parentheses next to "DGA" indicates that year's number of DGA finalists if other than five.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Flashback: Ellen Holly's "Living a White Life -- for a While" 1969

Living a White Life -- for a While

By Ellen Holly

New York Times

August 10, 1969

In September of last year I was approached to try out for a part on a brand new ABC soap opera called One Life To Live; the part was a black girl who passes for white. I didn't give it much thought. If you're black you don't get white parts either. But what most people don't realize is that even when there's a part for a "black who looks white," it never goes to a black person but to a white one. Follow? I know . . . I know . . . it's hard for me, too.

Some years ago I was interviewed for the film I Passed For White and the part went to the white Sandra Wilde. Some years later I was seen about the remake of Imitation of Life. Ross Hunter cooed over me, told me I looked like Loretta Young,
See full article at We Love Soaps »

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