6.3/10
1,439
34 user 10 critic

It's a Great Feeling (1949)

Passed | | Comedy, Music | 1 August 1949 (USA)
A waitress at the Warner Bros. commissary is anxious to break into pictures. She thinks her big break may have arrived when two actors agree to help her.

Director:

David Butler

Writers:

Jack Rose (screenplay), Melville Shavelson (screenplay) (as Mel Shavelson) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
Nominated for 1 Oscar. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Dennis Morgan ... Dennis Morgan
Doris Day ... Judy Adams
Jack Carson ... Jack Carson
Bill Goodwin ... Arthur Trent
Irving Bacon ... RR Information Clerk
Claire Carleton ... Grace
Mazzone-Abbott Dancers Mazzone-Abbott Dancers ... Dancers (as The Famous Mazzone-Abbott Dancers)
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Storyline

A waitress at the Warner Bros. commissary is anxious to break into pictures. She thinks her big break may have arrived when two actors agree to help her. Written by Daniel Bubbeo <dbubbeo@cmp.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Guest stars galore! See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Music

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

New York TV premiere was 9 March 1958 on WABD-TV channel 5. See more »

Goofs

When Judy falls down the steps during the phony Frenchwoman musical number, her brunette wig is thrown off and lands on the second step of the staircase. But when the crowd gathers around to help her, it has jumped up to the third step See more »

Quotes

Jack Carson: Hey Dennis, I think you've got something there. I'll discover her. I'll put her in the picture. I'll direct her, and that beautiful little doll will be grateful to me! *Very* grateful.
Dennis Morgan: Oh, no. *I* will discover her. I'll play the love scenes with her. We'll rehearse at my house at night. And she will be very grateful to *me*.
See more »

Connections

Featured in Joan Crawford: The Ultimate Movie Star (2002) See more »

Soundtracks

Wedding March
(uncredited)
from "A Midsummer Night's Dream"
Music by Felix Mendelssohn
Played at the wedding
See more »

User Reviews

 
Clever and witty self-referential spoof about Hollywood
20 August 2007 | by RJBurke1942See all my reviews

Without a doubt, classic Hollywood made some great musicals. This film is not one of them. And, there have been much better comedies from Tinsel Town also.

The distinguishing and saving features of this bit of frippery are two fold: first, you'll go a long way before finding another film with so many uncredited cameo appearances by major studio stars of the time (only Mike Todd's Around the World in 80 days, made in 1956, comes even close); and second, this is a snappy and self-referential send-up of the perils and pleasures of working in Hollywood.

The downside is this: if you were born after 1960, you probably won't appreciate the cameos by the actors and directors mainly because they'd gone from the scene – duh – by the time you started going to movies. But, on the upside…well, if you liked Robert Altman's The Player (1992), then this movie may appeal also.

The story, of course, is hackneyed: girl, working as a waitress (Doris Day), wants to get into movies, meets struggling director (Jack Carson) whom nobody likes, but who just happens to have a big-time singing star (Dennis Morgan) ready to help...

Good grief – David Lynch turned that short plot synopsis into a horror movie called Mulholland Drive (2001), minus the cameos – but not the singing. How about that?

Anyhow, back to the dilemmas of Doris...

Okay, the story sucks but the dialog is great and Jack Carson was always the guy to deliver perfect one-liners perfectly. I lost count of the number of times the dialog poked fun at every aspect of Hollywood life. And, the sight gags with the many and varied cameos are spot on, the standout performances coming from Gary Cooper, Edward G. Robinson and – how could anybody miss her? – Joan Crawford. And, look, if like me you don't like Dennis Morgan's singing, just turn off the sound for a minute or two and grab your next beer from the cooler.

And, for the record, the cameos I recognized are: Gary Cooper, Joan Crawford, Micheal Curtiz, Errol Flynn, Sydney Greenstreet, Danny Kaye, Patricia Neal, Eleanor Parker, Ronald Reagan, Edward G. Robinson, King Vidor, Raoul Walsh and Jane Wyman.

Now, after you've seen this very syrupy and mild expose of Hollywood life – but it's a lot of fun – take the time to see what it's really like with Lynch's little plot of horrors, mentioned above.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

1 August 1949 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Two Guys and a Gal See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Warner Bros. See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound System)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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