6.8/10
1,522
36 user 14 critic

It Happens Every Spring (1949)

Approved | | Comedy, Sci-Fi, Sport | June 1949 (USA)
A scientist discovers a formula that makes a baseball which is repelled by wood. He promptly sets out to exploit his discovery.

Director:

Lloyd Bacon

Writers:

Valentine Davies (screen play), Shirley W. Smith (based on a story by) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 1 nomination. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Ray Milland ... Prof. Vernon K. Simpson / King Kelly
Jean Peters ... Deborah Greenleaf
Paul Douglas ... Monk Lanigan
Ed Begley ... Edgar Stone
Ted de Corsia ... Manager Jimmy Dolan
Ray Collins ... Prof. Alfred Greenleaf
Jessie Royce Landis ... Mrs. Greenleaf
Alan Hale Jr. ... Schmidt
William Murphy ... Tommy Isbell (as Bill Murphy)
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Storyline

A college professor is working on a long term experiment when a baseball comes through the window destroying all his glassware. The resultant fluid causes the baseball to be repelled by wood. Suddenly he realizes the possibilities and takes a leave of absence to go to St. Louis to pitch in the big leagues where he becomes a star and propels the team to a World Series appearance. Written by John Vogel <jlvogel@comcast.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Sci-Fi | Sport

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Ray Milland coats a majority of baseballs he pitches with his special chemical concoction from a pad hidden inside his glove. Although the movie never indicates how long the coating on a ball remains effective, baseball fans know that the umpire replaces the baseball after about each foul ball and approximately six pitches. So, there was little chance that Milland's coated baseballs might accidentally end up in the hands of the opposing team's pitcher, allowing him pitch the same hopping curve balls that Milland was able to throw. See more »

Goofs

Objects on the dresser change as Monk and Vernon chat. See more »

Quotes

[During a conversation with Professor Greenleaf, Professor Joe Forsythe verbally says this movie's title, in the last sentence, as their conversation concludes, word for word]
Prof. Joe Fosythe: It happens every spring.
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Crazy Credits

After the movie's introductory song concludes, an Albert Einstein quote shows for ten to fifteen seconds. It is: "The results of scientific research very often force a change in the philosophical view of problems which extend far beyond the restricted domain of science itself." Albert Einstein's name is all capital letters, below the quote or remark, as ALBERT EINSTEIN. Albert Einstein & Leopold Infeld co-authored book, "The Evolution of Physics". See more »

Connections

Featured in Sports on the Silver Screen (1997) See more »

Soundtracks

I'm Looking Over a Four-Leaf Clover
(1927) (uncredited)
Music by Harry M. Woods
Played when St. Louis takes the field after Monk hurts his finger
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User Reviews

 
Entertaining But Brutally Bad Baseball
23 December 2005 | by ccthemovieman-1See all my reviews

Talk about dated! However, that's not a knock because dated many times means fun to watch, and nostalgic for some. This is an entertaining film and very likable.

But, if you are a baseball fan or know anything about the game, be prepared. This has the hokiest baseball scenes ever put on film. It's almost like those corny Ed Wood and others sci-fi films of the 1950s that are so bad, so corny that they are good, if you know what I mean.

The actors in here have NO CLUE how to throw a baseball or how to bat. Ray Milland is a pitcher and the star of the show and he has no idea but his catcher, played by Paul Douglas, is worse. He is embarrassingly bad. You remember the expression, "He throws like a girl!?" Well, that's Douglas. You mean with all the actors in Hollywood, they couldn't find ONE who knows how to throw a baseball?

There are so many bloopers in here - like "St. Louis" being replaced by "Chicago" on the jerseys when there are long-distance shots. You could write a novel on all the filming mistakes in here.

Yet, it's just a lighthearted comedy and, if taken in that context, easier to swallow and enjoy. The story is at its funniest when Milland pitches and the ball dispy- doodles around the baseball bats of all the hitters. (He had invented a substance that applied to something makes it avoid touching wood, so applied to a baseball, a bat could never make contact.....and, yes, as one reviewer points out, that is cheating.)

Dumb...but innocent fun and definitely has enough laughs to make it worthwhile watching.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

June 1949 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

La solución fantástica See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Twentieth Century Fox See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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