6.9/10
1,539
36 user 14 critic

It Happens Every Spring (1949)

Approved | | Comedy, Sci-Fi, Sport | June 1949 (USA)
A scientist discovers a formula that makes a baseball which is repelled by wood. He promptly sets out to exploit his discovery.

Director:

Lloyd Bacon

Writers:

Valentine Davies (screen play), Shirley W. Smith (based on a story by) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 1 nomination. See more awards »

Photos

Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
Ray Milland ... Prof. Vernon K. Simpson / King Kelly
Jean Peters ... Deborah Greenleaf
Paul Douglas ... Monk Lanigan
Ed Begley ... Edgar Stone
Ted de Corsia ... Manager Jimmy Dolan
Ray Collins ... Prof. Alfred Greenleaf
Jessie Royce Landis ... Mrs. Greenleaf
Alan Hale Jr. ... Schmidt
William Murphy ... Tommy Isbell (as Bill Murphy)
Edit

Storyline

A college professor is working on a long term experiment when a baseball comes through the window destroying all his glassware. The resultant fluid causes the baseball to be repelled by wood. Suddenly he realizes the possibilities and takes a leave of absence to go to St. Louis to pitch in the big leagues where he becomes a star and propels the team to a World Series appearance. Written by John Vogel <jlvogel@comcast.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Sci-Fi | Sport

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

All the baseball teams are identified by their city but never by their nicknames. Even the home team uniforms, which should have the team nicknames, list the city instead. The reason is because the commissioner of baseball, Happy Chandler, would not sanction the movie because of the cheating element in the movie. So 20th Century Fox could not use the the name of the teams or even use cameo baseball player walk ons like the studio wanted to do. See more »

Goofs

When King Kelly relieves the pitcher in his debut game, the scoreboard reads Chicago 6, St. Louis (Kelly's team) 7, top of the sixth inning, with no outs. After Kelly retires one batter, his team leaves the field and celebrates their victory as they change out of their uniforms in the locker room. Perhaps, the game was one that rain had postponed, the previous day, when Vernon was strongly wanting to become a baseball pitcher, without any rookie team practice. Or there was an off-screen decision, among the managers, that the game was shortened to six innings, because Saint Louis had a weak team, and could not go nine innings and win a majority of their games, until Vernon Simpson, aka King Kelly was tested and accepted. See more »

Quotes

[During a conversation with Professor Greenleaf, Professor Joe Forsythe verbally says this movie's title, in the last sentence, as their conversation concludes, word for word]
Prof. Joe Fosythe: It happens every spring.
See more »

Crazy Credits

After the movie's introductory song concludes, an Albert Einstein quote shows for ten to fifteen seconds. It is: "The results of scientific research very often force a change in the philosophical view of problems which extend far beyond the restricted domain of science itself." Albert Einstein's name is all capital letters, below the quote or remark, as ALBERT EINSTEIN. Albert Einstein & Leopold Infeld co-authored book, "The Evolution of Physics". See more »

Connections

References Jungle Patrol (1948) See more »

Soundtracks

I'm Looking Over a Four-Leaf Clover
(1927) (uncredited)
Music by Harry M. Woods
Played when St. Louis takes the field after Monk hurts his finger
See more »

User Reviews

 
Thankfully, It Happens Every Spring
2 April 2005 | by guildf30See all my reviews

Not quite in the league of "It's a Wonderful Life" or "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington," but a great fantasy story of the egghead professor in the hard boiled world of baseball.

Paul Douglas steals the movie as the craggy old pro catcher, Monk Lanigan. Watch for a young Alan Hale, Jr., later to be the Skipper in "Gilligan's Island." Take a look at the writing credits for the writer of this one. Sterling. Also, a great feel for 40's baseball fans, baseball stadiums, just baseball. I loved this film as a kid, still love it now.

This film should be as much a harbinger of spring as the first robin. Don't miss it!


26 of 28 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 36 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

June 1949 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

It Happens Every Spring See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Twentieth Century Fox See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed