6.3/10
567
28 user 9 critic

The Sign of the Ram (1948)

Approved | | Drama, Film-Noir, Thriller | 3 March 1948 (USA)
A jealous, manipulative stepmother confined to a wheelchair interferes with her stepchildren's romances so that they will not get married and leave home.

Director:

John Sturges

Writers:

Charles Bennett (screen play), Margaret Ferguson (novel)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Susan Peters ... Leah St. Aubyn
Alexander Knox ... Mallory St. Aubyn
Phyllis Thaxter ... Sherida Binyon
Peggy Ann Garner ... Christine St. Aubyn
Ron Randell ... Dr. Simon Crowdy
May Whitty ... Clara Brastock (as Dame May Whitty)
Allene Roberts ... Jane St. Aubyn
Ross Ford ... Logan St. Aubyn
Diana Douglas ... Catherine Woolton
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Storyline

The St. Aubyns live in Bastians, a sprawling sixteenth century house built by Spaniards just outside of the town of Tremerrion atop the cliffs on the wind-swept Cornish coast. Leah St. Aubyn, a writer branching off into poetry, is the younger second wife of Major Mallory St. Aubyn, who largely tends to the plants in his greenhouse when he isn't looking after Leah. Mallory's three offspring, Logan, Jane and Christine, love Leah like their own mother, despite she being not much older than them. Leah and Mallory's first wife, Rosanna, were friends, Leah and Mallory who married a year after Rosanna's passing. The love within the household with Leah was only strengthened when, two years into the marriage, Leah saved Logan and Jane from drowning, Leah who endured an injury in the process and now uses a wheelchair. A contentment about her situation seems to have settled into Leah's psyche since the accident. Logan, a law student, and Jane are at an age when they will be striking out on their... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Incredible evil!


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Although this was heralded as Susan Peters' comeback film, it turned out to be her final feature film. See more »

Goofs

[All goofs for this title are spoilers.] See more »

Quotes

Clara Brastock: [to Sherida, whom she's just met] And now, dear girl, just run off and tell Tregallis, my chauffeur, not to wallow in beer in the kitchen. I'll be off in a minute.
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Crazy Credits

"The return to the screen of Miss SUSAN PETERS" See more »

Soundtracks

Sonata in C Major #7, Rondo (Allegretto Grazioso)
Composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Played by Susan Peters on the piano
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User Reviews

 
The Tremerrion Tribulations.
27 January 2017 | by hitchcockthelegendSee all my reviews

The Sign of the Ram is directed by John Sturges and adapted to screenplay from Margaret Ferguson's novel. It stars Susan Peters, Alexandev Knox, Phyllis Thaxter, Peggy Ann Garner, Ron Randell, Dame May Witty and Allene Roberts. Music is by Hans J. Salter and cinematography by Burnett Guffey.

Wheelchair bound Leah St. Aubyn (Peters) manipulates everybody around her...

"It's the sign of the ram. People born under this sign are endowed with a strong will power and obstinacy of purpose"

The setting is a cliff top mansion, a lighthouse is nearby, its purpose is to steer ships out of the fog and away from harms way. This is the fictitious Cornish place known as Tremerrion, and our play unfolds in the mansion known as Bastions. It's film that has proved to be a bit illusive to pin down, for whatever reasons, and that is a shame because there are plenty things for fans of such devilish dramas to be excited about. The backstory of the leading lady is itself tragic, for Susan Peters would be paralysed from the waist down after a freak hunting accident, this would see her appear in her last film. She gave up on life, tortured by pain and the loss of her ability to walk, she would starve to death and pass away four years later. Thankfully, and it's not sympathetic praise here, she's excellent and leaves film fans a fitting farewell to the movie world.

"Haven't you sensed it? The undertone, like a warning drumbeat"

Stripped down it's the story of a woman who manipulates everyone close to her, cunningly so, her reasons deliberately shaded in grey, and the question constantly gnaws away as to just how come her family and confidants can't see it?. Sooner or later something is going to give, and it's the waiting that gives the pic an edginess that's most appealing. This woman has no shame, we are told by her loyal spouse that she's not bitter about her accident, but she so is, but wears it well. She's not only spell bindingly pretty, but she's pretty spell bindingly devious too. The fog rolls in, the waves crash against the coast to marry up with the psychological discord being set loose in Bastions. Salter's music swirls and bites, while genius cinematographer Guffey turns in some class frames (one scene involving criss cross shadows is film noir nirvana).

"They will stop at nothing to accomplice their purpose - and sometimes meet a violent death"

Pulsing with jealousies, betrayals, suspicions and a whole host of devious machinations, this be a crafty old devil, a pic deconstructing the human condition with malicious glee. 7/10


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Latin

Release Date:

3 March 1948 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Sign of the Ram See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Signet Productions See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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