Scaredy Cat (1948) Poster

(1948)

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9/10
A classic cartoon in which the horrific is just as important as the hilarious
phantom_tollbooth18 August 2008
Chuck Jones's 'Scaredy Cat' is the best of the few pairings of Porky Pig and Sylvester. Casting Porky as Sylvester's owner (Sylvester is more cat-like than usual, remaining silent for the whole cartoon), 'Scaredy Cat' finds the pair moving into a spooky mansion which terrifies Sylvester from the outset. Rather than ghosts, however, the mansion is populated by murderous mice who ritually execute their victims. Somehow this makes 'Scaredy Cat' all the more frightening. And it is frightening! There are several morbid sequences including a scene of a cat being carted off to his death by a mousey executioner and a moment in which Sylvester attempts suicide rather than being sent out to face the vicious vermin alone. Most terrifying of all though, is an infamous sequence in which the mice take Sylvester to the basement. We never see what they do to him but he emerges nearly three hours later, a pale white zombie scared rigid by what he has experienced. It's a classic example of the human mind conjuring up far worse scenarios when the details are left to the imagination. All in all, 'Scaredy Cat' is an indelibly creepy and extremely well staged cartoon which relies on horror as much as laughs to achieve its impact.
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The first in a series of Sylvester/Porky cartoons
rapt0r_claw-117 July 2004
Scaredy Cat is the first in a series of Porky/Sylvester teamings directed by Chuck Jones, and the series certainly started with a bang. Sylvester and his master Porky move into the last house the real estate agent had, for reasons only Sylvester understands. The house is inhabited by homicidal mice, who will stop at nothing to kill the intruders most painfully. Sylvester is the only one who knows what's going on, and the oblivious Porky mistakes Sylvester's attempts to save him as murderous. The animation of Porky is good, but Sylvester doesn't really look like himself. We must take into consideration that Sylvester was quite a new face in '48, and besides Jones never really drew him like Freleng did. The best horror scenes are those in which the mice's plans don't come off, like Sylvester's empty basket descending. The audience never knows what happened to the basket, nor what happened to Sylvester when he goes all white. This is a brilliantly funny cartoon, essential for all Looney Tunes fans, and as all Looney Tunes fans will have the Golden Collection DVD, all fans will see it!
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9/10
Both funny and freaky
TheLittleSongbird14 June 2010
While not the best of the Looney Tunes canon, it is still enjoyable with a lot to recommend it. The villainous mice could have been developed more, but other than that I had little problem with Scaredy Cat. Porky and Sylvester are both great, especially Sylvester who gets the worst of the scares, particularly the infamous sequence down in the basement, that and the scene after did scare me as a kid. As well as being freaky, there are some funny moments too, slapsticky yes but they were well timed and funny. The animation is excellent, Sylvester is somewhat different-looking, but Porky is drawn very well and the backgrounds and colouring are audacious. The music is both rousing and atmospheric, the dialogue is great, the gags are fine, the story is well-constructed and quite original and Mel Blanc is once again brilliant as both Sylvester and Porky. Overall, not the best but very well done. 9/10 Bethany Cox
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8/10
Chuck Jones' Scaredy Cat delivers spooks and humor galore
tavm5 January 2008
In most cartoons starring Sylvester the Cat that are directed by Friz Freling or Robert McKimson, the pussycat is usually the aggressor who's after either Tweety or Hippity Hopper, the baby kangaroo mistaken for a giant mouse either by the red-nosed feline or his son, Sylvester, Jr. In Chuck Jones' Scaredy Cat, he's Porky Pig's mute pet who, despite many attempts of signaling his master of danger, gets admonished as being delusional since Porky always sees something different. This change of characterization is quite convincing in Jones' hands and he stages many scenes of mice about to carry another cat for execution quite atmospheric. The rodents look like Hubie and Bertie, by the way. Quite funny scenes of Porky just being nonchalant almost the whole way when weird things happen behind his back. The ending may be lost to modern audiences but Scaredy Cat is mostly successful in being spooky and highly amusing at the same time.
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10/10
Most frightening scene
estafarol12 August 2007
Warning: Spoilers
The scene where Sylvester is lying unconscious on his bed in the kitchen, and was lowered through a trap door from 1:10 am to 4:00 am is probably the most frightening scene I never watched on a cartoon. They never show what happened to Sylvester, but when he returns, he's changed physically and looks completely traumatized (his fur is white and looks aged, he's not shivering anymore, and his eyes are dilated and with a lost look). Not showing what's in the basement urges you to try to figure it, and you'll probably end realizing the horrors Sylvester witnessed are beyond your imagination. That kind of involvement of the audience is, in my humble opinion, the most elegant form of horror to me!
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9/10
Sylvester minus that awful Tweety
Porky Pig and his loyal cat Sylvester move into a big scary looking house and Sylvester (who doesn't have any dialogue in this 'un) is instantly panicky and afraid. He's sure the house is over-run with homicidal mice, booby traps and ominous shadows. However Porky doesn't appear to be listening and insists Sylvester sleep in the kitchen and not beside him, where he feels more safe.

Sure enough, it's not long before the mice are poking at and prodding Sylvester with sharp objects or launching the poor kitty through windows. Despite repeated attempts, Porky will just not pay attention until he himself is kidnapped.

Now it's up to Sylvester to rescue him in an unusual role as the victim turned hero. You gotta love him, he's just so adorable.
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5/10
Should Have Been Much Funnier
ccthemovieman-121 February 2007
Porky and Sylvester are checking out their new home, which looks like "The Munsters" mansion or "The Addams Family" house. Sylvester is scared stiff, right from the start entering the spooky house. Porky is just happy to have a house - the only one his real estate agent had to offer. Sylvester won't let go of Porky, literally.

The cartoon didn't live up to its premise and wasn't really that funny. Poor Sylvester is unfairly accused of a few things until the end, so it was a bit frustrating more than funny to watch. Justice did prevail, although the ending also was weak.

Let's be honest: it wasn't one of the Looney Tunes' better efforts.
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8/10
The most freaky Looney Tunes short
Mightyzebra28 November 2008
This is one of two cartoons I have watched with Porky and Sylvester (the other being "Jumpin' Jupiter"). Personally, I thought this cartoon worked very well, with a new theme of horror (which is both funny and freaky) and the fact that Sylvester never speaks and is a great deal more of a coward than a hunter of Tweety (who is not in this cartoon whatsoever). Porky is an entertaining character here, who is especially heart-warming closer to the end.

In this short, Porky and Sylvester have moved into a big, spooky house and Sylvester is terrified of his new surroundings. He has good reason to be terrified, as the house is populated with horribly murdering mice. Sylvester, as he is a cat who cannot speak, cannot tell Porky of the horrible creatures in the house and just stays close to his owner, hoping that they will not be killed...

I enjoyed this cartoon for the originality of it and for some of the jokes, which, despite being very slapsticky, were quite humorous. I enjoyed the new character of Sylvester, whom I prefer to his character with Tweety, of which he is more famous for.

I recommend this to people who like Sylvester and Porky and who like/don't mind to see cartoon horror. Enjoy "Scaredy Cat"! :-)
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6/10
Sylvester the likable hero this time
Horst_In_Translation20 January 2016
Warning: Spoilers
"Scaredy Cat" is a Warner Bros short film from over 65 years ago that combines once again the talents of Chuck Jones, Michael Maltese and Mel Blanc. Porky enters a haunted house, but initially, the only one who sees all the spooky things is his cat Sylvester and he is scared as hell. Porky thinks Sylvester is a coward until he gets caught by the mice himself in what is possibly the funniest moment of the film. Finally, it is Sylvester's turn to save his master and show he is truly courageous. What we see then is basically almost an example of how Sylvester has some kind of super power. Too bad we don't see the details. And after he manages to chase away all these mice, he is back to his normal incompetent self when he gets knocked out by just one of them. All in all, a solid short film, but nowhere near Warner Bros's best. Still, if you like old cartoons, this one is checking out for the horror aspects I guess. Thumbs up.
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7/10
Suffering succotash! The pig's got his tongue!
oscaralbert30 December 2015
Warning: Spoilers
. . . At least, Sylvester Cat needs to communicate with Porky Pig through an elaborate method of pantomime, during the Warner Bros. animated short SCAREDY CAT. While Sylvester yaks a lot with other cats in many of his Looney Tunes episodes with Tweety Bird, and he often tries to bridge the Generation Gap with his son, Junior, while getting beaten up during his encounters with Hippety Hopper, there's barely a peep out of Sylvester throughout SCAREDY CAT, whether he's contending with his owner Porky or the mice marauding through their not-so-new home. Though this loyal Super Cat saves Porky's bacon from rodent attacks via falling anvil and rolling bowling ball, Porky is not very appreciative until Sylvester breaks up the Big Ham's date with the Guillotine. Since mice in the basement and suicide-by-gun are facts of American Life that we've all experienced, Warner Bros. should be commended for finding the humor in such situations, allowing us all to laugh about it later (except for the mice and the folks who are steady shots).
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8/10
Really funny Sylvester & Porky cartoon
utgard143 November 2015
Classic Chuck Jones short with Porky Pig and his cat Sylvester moving into a run-down old house. Sylvester soon discovers the house is full of not-so-friendly mice that try to kill them at every turn. This is the first of three cartoons that paired Porky and Sylvester in a spooky place where strange things are happening. The animation is fluid and beautiful with rich Technicolor and well-drawn characters and backgrounds. Excellent voice work from Mel Blanc. Lively music by Carl Stalling. This is a great cartoon with nice atmosphere and lots of humor. Sylvester gets the funniest bits, despite his not talking in this entire short. The mice are a hoot! Love the ending.
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10/10
there are plenty of reasons to be afraid of the dark, but they make you laugh when the Looney Tunes are involved
lee_eisenberg4 January 2007
In the first Sylvester/Porky pairing, they move into an abandoned house, which Sylvester discovers is inhabited by killer mice. Every time that he saves Porky from getting murdered, the clueless Porky thinks that Sylvester is the crazy one. Sylvester just never seems to have any luck! One thing that I wondered was whether or not the apparently evil rodents are supposed to be Hubie and Bertie (or their relatives); they looked pretty similar. If you've seen enough Looney Tunes cartoons, you may recall that Hubie and Bertie are those mice who play all sorts of nasty tricks on Claude the Cat to get him out of the house.

Oh well. Whether they are or not, "Scaredy Cat" is still a great cartoon. "Claws for Alarm" had almost exactly the same plot.
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Nice Short
Michael_Elliott12 April 2009
Scaredy Cat (1948)

*** (out of 4)

Fun Merrie Melodies short has Porky Pig buying a new house but his cat Sylvester is the only one that can see the strange things going on in it. This leads to some misunderstanding as Porky doesn't realize the danger inside the house and Sylvester will have to build up the courage to fight it. This is a pretty good entry in the series as both Porky and Sylvester are at the top of their game. The biggest weakness is that the mice really aren't developed too well so they're only middle ground villains. The best sequence in the movie is when the mice push the bed out the window and Sylvester gets blamed for what follows even though he's just trying to save Porky.
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"Pussycats is the cwaziest peoples!"
slymusic11 February 2006
Warning: Spoilers
"Scaredy Cat" is an entertaining Porky/Sylvester cartoon, with Porky in his typical fussy middle-aged bachelor role who is constantly annoyed at Sylvester's childishly scared mannerisms. In fact, probably the best thing about this short is Porky's stuttering reactions to Sylvester's paranoia about the "haunted" house where they are staying.

Some of the funniest scenes in "Scaredy Cat" include the following. Sylvester jumps into Porky's nightshirt after he sees a group of mice executioners carrying a cat to the guillotine. Later, Sylvester prevents an anvil and a bowling ball (both supplied by the mice) from whacking Porky in the head, but Porky of course misunderstands and demands an explanation from the mute Sylvester. (In fact, throughout most of the film Porky simply misses out on all the mischief that the mice create, and this only adds to Sylvester's hysteria.) Porky is even too absentminded to notice that the mice pushed his bed out the window onto a flagpole while he is sleeping!

"Scaredy Cat" is a well-named cartoon, and Porky and Sylvester make a great team. A similar "haunted house" premise cropped up again with the world-famous pig and cat in "Claws for Alarm" (1954).
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9/10
A Chuck Jones Classic.
stephen068423 October 2005
Warning: Spoilers
While the only downside in this cartoon is that Sylvester didn't speak, this is still an classic by the late Chuck Jones. Porky and Sylvester arrive an an run down house (the last that the real estate agent had,) right away the cat gets scared by an bat. Porky loves the house and decides to turn in while Sylvester sleeps in the kitchen. That's where the fun really starts. He gets scared by every little thing and runs to Porky who is trying to sleep. In one scene they're outside and Porky asked Sylvester to closed the window which launches the bed back to the house which was an good gag. Eventually, Porky is fed up with Sylvester and checks it out for himself. The pig gets tied up and gagged and Sylvester runs away. Then his angel arrived and convinces him to remove the mice. Which he did expect 1 who drops an bowling ball on Sylvester's head. Like I said, the downside is that Sylvester is silent but it's still an classic by Chuck Jones. I highly recommend it and its squeal Claws for Alarm. Final Score: an 9 out of 10.
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8/10
I love Sylvester with no Tweety
movieman_kev21 December 2004
Warning: Spoilers
Porky Pig and Sylvester the Cat find themselves in a spooky house where Sylvester sees dastardly mice planning an execution, needless to say Porky doesn't believe him for much of the short.I liked this cartoon, as Slvester is a favorite character of mine and tweety isn't in this at all, I could never really stand that bird so that's another reason I liked this one. Also call me a tad morbid, but when Sylvester nonviolently tried to commit suicide I found myself laughing. This funny cartoon is on Disk 2 of the "Looney Tunes Golden Collection Volume 1"

My Grade: B+
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Funny and enjoyable
bob the moo20 February 2004
Porky Pig and his cat Sylvester move into a new home; the last one the estate agents had available. The house spooks Sylvester even if Porky doesn't realise the threat posed by the homicidal mice that inhabit it. Sylvester tries the best he can to protect his master (and himself).

Although it's colourful animation falls more towards the classic look of WB than the ones made on the cheap, the plot doesn't manage to do quite as well and what we have is a basic story where Sylvester gets picked on by mice and runs constantly to the impatient Porky. It is funny but it is not as imaginative or as funny as it should be. The plot feels like it didn't have as much to it as there could have been.

Likewise, the film doesn't use the main character of Sylvester very well; he is a silent fall guy, mugging his way through the series of misadventures. Porky is much better and gets his share of laughs. The mice are fairly nondescript but do the job; however I didn't get the reference at the end.

Overall this is an amusing short, that works mostly due to a good turn from Porky acting as a bookend to Sylvester's moments. Not great but quite fun.
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The best Sylvester cartoon I've ever seen!
Sk8ta19873 November 2002
An old house, porky, sylvester, some ghouls, and killer mice! What a combo. Porky Pig moves into an old house with his scitsophrantic pussy cat. The house itself looks like the Bates House from the movie Psycho. But anyways, Sylvester keeps on seeing these strange apparitions, and then finally gets really creeped out when he sees a group of axe holding mice draging a tied up cat down a dark hallway. Sylvester then tries numerous times to stay in porky's room instead of sleeping down in the kitchen. The mice start to try and kill porky (sylvester is the only one who notices of course) and when he tries to save him, it backfire's leaving sylvester in pain. A great cartoon! One of my favorites!
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