7.6/10
12,149
95 user 91 critic

The Naked City (1948)

Not Rated | | Crime, Drama, Film-Noir | 4 March 1948 (USA)
A step-by-step look at a murder investigation on the streets of New York.

Director:

Jules Dassin

Writers:

Albert Maltz (screenplay), Malvin Wald (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
Won 2 Oscars. Another 1 win & 4 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Barry Fitzgerald ... Lt. Dan Muldoon
Howard Duff ... Frank Niles
Dorothy Hart ... Ruth Morrison
Don Taylor ... Jimmy Halloran
Frank Conroy ... Captain Donahue
Ted de Corsia ... Willly Garzah (as Ted De Corsia)
House Jameson ... Dr. Stoneman
Anne Sargent Anne Sargent ... Mrs. Halloran
Adelaide Klein Adelaide Klein ... Mrs. Batory
Grover Burgess ... Mr. Batory
Tom Pedi ... Detective Perelli
Enid Markey ... Mrs. Hylton
Mark Hellinger ... Narrator (voice)
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Storyline

Amid a semi-documentary portrait of New York and its people, Jean Dexter, an attractive blonde model, is murdered in her apartment. Homicide detectives Dan Muldoon and Jimmy Halloran investigate. Suspicion falls on various shifty characters who all prove to have some connection with a string of apartment burglaries. Then a burglar is found dead who once had an elusive partner named Willie. The climax is a very rapid manhunt sequence. Filmed entirely on location in New York City. Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Actually filmed on the sidewalks of New York! See more »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

A marquee from Loew's Delancy Theater (NYC) advertising Alias Nick Beal (1949) starring Ray Milland is shown behind actor Paul Ford near the end of the film. See more »

Goofs

In the scene near the end where Garza is running along a street in New York, the car holding the camera (in the passenger window) is visible in the store windows, keeping pace with the actor as he stops and starts. See more »

Quotes

[last lines]
Narrator: There are eight million stories in the naked city. This has been one of them.
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Crazy Credits

The opening credits are spoken by producer/narrator Mark Hellinger. No credits are seen on the screen. See more »

Connections

References The Imperfect Lady (1946) See more »

Soundtracks

Sobre las Olas (Over the Waves)
(1887) (uncredited)
Written by Juventino Rosas
Background music for the girls on swings
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User Reviews

 
The merging of Film Noir with a realistic police drama
14 March 2007 | by MartinHaferSee all my reviews

This film is in many ways a good example of Film Noir--since it portrays a murder and its investigation, has a classic Noir-style ending and has some very "dark" story elements. However, unlike traditional Film Noir, the dialog and lighting are much more like a traditional film--less snappy dialog and more of an emphasis on conventional police work. This is NOT really a bad thing, as the film still was very entertaining but with a lighter and almost documentary feel to it and with a greater emphasis on the police work instead of on the sleazy Noir villains. In fact, since the film focused on the police and the day to day aspects of the investigation, it helped to usher in a style of film making that would be very popular in the 1950s on TV and in theaters (such as the show DRAGNET or the movie HE WALKED BY NIGHT).

The film itself stars Barry Fitzgerald. This is a VERY unusual casting decision but it did work very well. Normally, Fitzgerald is known for cute supporting roles, like the ones he played in GOING MY WAY and THE QUIET MAN. Here, however, he's a detective who coordinates the investigation. I liked it this way because he was far from the macho cop but more like a REAL policeman--experienced, smart and not about to resort to a fist fight with his foes--avoiding the usual movie clichés to say the least! In addition, the rest of the cast also seem more like real policemen when compared to other films of the time. The criminals, likewise, seem real and aren't obviously "bad" like they usually are in crime films--again a big plus.

So overall, this is a very realistic and engaging crime film with elements of Noir but certainly NOT the traditional style for the genre (the familiar Noir dialog, lighting, film angles, femme fatales, etc. are missing because they wouldn't be appropriate). It may disappoint some die-hard Noir fans, but for me it was quite acceptable and a good change of pace.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

4 March 1948 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Homicide See more »

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$2,400,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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