My Bunny Lies Over the Sea (1948) Poster

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A fine series of gags and strong characterizations make this another winner from Chuck Jones, Michael Maltese and company; love that final gag!
J. Spurlin21 March 2007
Bugs Bunny takes the wrong turn at Albuquerque and ends up tunneling into Scotland (!). There he immediately attacks a horrible monster engulfing a defenseless old lady. Only it turns out the "monster" is a set of bagpipes and the "old lady" is a man in a kilt. Bugs thinks this is indecent (despite his own predilection for drag) and throws a barrel over the Scotsman. This is too much, and the angry Scot tries to blow out Bugs's brains. Soon the two opponents settle the matter more civilly - with a game of golf. Bugs's golfing strategy leaves most of his scruples buried under a divot. The infuriated Scotsman suggests one more contest, again underestimating the quick-witted bunny.

A fine series of gags and strong characterizations make this another winner from Chuck Jones, Michael Maltese and company. "McGrory," as Bugs dubs him at one point, gives a series of priceless reactions to the befuddling Bugs. Love that final gag!

This cartoon is available on the "Looney Tunes Golden Collection, Volume One," Disc 1.
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Golf and bagpipes
slymusic26 June 2009
Warning: Spoilers
"My Bunny Lies over the Sea" is a fine Bugs Bunny cartoon directed by Chuck Jones. This time around, the wascawwy wabbit matches wits with a pompous, arrogant Scotsman (voiced by Mel Blanc, of course).

Here are my personal favorite moments from this cartoon. Believing the Scot to be a helpless little old lady, Bugs attacks a "horrible monster" (the gentleman's bagpipes). For the ending, Bugs adds a bass drum, cymbals, clarinets, a trumpet, a trombone, and a saxophone to his own set of bagpipes. During the golf tournament, the expression on Bugs' face is hilarious as he indicates to the Scot that his impatient foot-tapping is very rude while Bugs plans his first swing; I also love how Bugs makes use of an "auction" to bring his fifty-five swings down to one.

"My Bunny Lies over the Sea" is proof that Bugs Bunny can outwit just about ANYBODY with whom he comes into contact.
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8/10
Scottish
Mightyzebra8 November 2008
Though this Looney Tunes episode has a great deal of stereotypical Scottish things featured, it is good all the same (the Scottish seem to love being their stereotypes for some reason, so it is OK that they do do it this way.)

In "My Bunny Lies Over the Sea", Bugs Bunny is yet again trying to reach a place by going underground - and, as usual, he takes the wrong turn at Alberquerque - and ends up in the Highland of Scotland! He angers the first Scotsman he sees by ruining his bagpipes - and the Scotsman challenges the rabbit to a game of golf.

The only mediocre thing about the episode was the predictability of the game of golf. The backgrounds, the other jokes (there are some very good verbal jokes here towards the end which are hard to catch) and the Scottishness about it were all brilliant. I also loved the background of Loch Lomond - very detailed for a Looney Tunes episode and quite true. Wonder if the Termite Terrace team went to Scotland before doing this episode...

I recommend this episode to people who love Scotland, Bugs Bunny and Looney Tunes. Enjoy "My Bunny Lies Over the Sea"! :-)
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A nice cartoon in a new setting for Bugs.
rapt0r_claw-121 December 2003
In this early cartoon, Bugs Bunny forgets that left turn at Albuquerque, and ends up in Scotland, where he meets a Scot, and they have a disagreement. After finding that Scottish people don't play cards to settle issues, Bugs plays golf against the Scot. Once again, the rabbit's inventiveness baffles the foreigner.

Warner Bros. released this on two videos and DVD, which is good news. Bugs pulls some funny stunts out on the green, and I like his impersonation of a Scottish landowner. There's a good auction spoof as well. All of it is funny, though not above the average Looney Tunes cartoon. Recommended.
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8/10
There is nae (well, little) wackier than yon bonnie rabbit playing golf!
lee_eisenberg25 December 2006
Maybe "My Bunny Lies Over the Sea" stereotypes the Scots as kilt-clad, bagpipe-playing grouches, but it is a hilarious cartoon. After Bugs Bunny forgets that left turn at Albuquerque, he ends up on the bonnie banks of Loch Lomond in Scotland, where he and a local settle a dispute by playing golf. Needless to say, Bugs turns the whole thing on its head.

Among other things, this cartoon makes one nostalgic for the days - which may have been well over 100 years ago - when golf represented Scottish heritage and wasn't just something that rich snobs did to waste time (especially given that Jack Abramoff took Tom DeLay and Bob Ney on the golfing trip in Scotland a few years ago). But mostly, it's a classic cartoon plain and simple. Or, to say it like they would in Scotland: Ay, 'tis a wonderful wee cartoon, ya blasted Englishman! I wonder if that was the Wallace plaid during the opening credits. As a descendant of William Wallace (Scotland's greatest patriot and the subject of "Braveheart"), I hope that it was.
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8/10
Entertaining
TheLittleSongbird13 March 2011
I wouldn't put My Bunny Lies Over the Sea among the best of the Looney Tunes canon, but it was an enjoyable and entertaining cartoon. Even with its predictable game of golf and I wouldn't have minded it being a minute or so longer as well.That said, it goes at a cracking pace, has some fine sight gags and dialogue, beautiful crisp animation and an energetic music score. Also Mel Blanc as he always does does a fantastic job with all the voices. Bugs is still the witty and likable rabbit that I fell in love with, and the support characters work well too. I loved the title too, almost poetic like a love song.Overall, an entertaining cartoon. 8/10 Bethany Cox
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8/10
Happy Gilmore Only Wishes He Could Pull Off These Stunts On The Links
MartyD82-125 June 2006
In perhaps Bugs's first reference to that "wrong turn at Albequerque," he instead finds himself in Scotland where he encounters a Scottish bagpipe player (whom he mistakenly presumes is an old lady being attacked by a monster - if that makes sense to you). After Bugs unknowingly destroys the Scotsman's bagpipes, he decides to settle the dispute by challenging the rabbit to a game of golf. Wackiness ensues.

Although nothing above the ordinary, this is still a pretty amusing Bugs Bunny short. The interplay between him and the Scotsman at the beginning is funny (particularly Bugs's portrayal of a Scottish landowner). As are several of the tricks Bugs plays on him when on the links. As far as characterization is concerned, Bugs is his usual tricky self (but no more) while the Scotsman is the stereotypical foreigner complete with a deliberately funny Scottish accent. With no other characters to speak of, this may be one of Bugs's most simplistic cartoons ever (not to be confused with "worst" mind you). The surprise ending is pretty funny too as it finally gives the Scotsman a fair come-uppance.

Perhaps the most interesting thing about this short is its animation. Despite being released in 1948, the cartoon both looks and sounds more like a 1950s short. By contrast, later shorts like High Diving Hare and Rebel Rabbit look and feel more like 1940s shorts. This just goes to show how ahead of his time Chuck Jones really was as his less cinematic style of animation was in the 70s and 80s imitated by almost every cartoonist in one way or another.

Overall, this is a fairly average Bugs Bunny cartoon. But understand that an average Bugs cartoon is still better than a top cartoon with most other cartoon characters. That alone makes it well worth watching.
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4/10
A 'Bogey' For This Bugs Bunny Cartoon
ccthemovieman-120 February 2007
The golf scenes in here were okay but nothing to "write home about." The better laughs - and there weren't many in this sub-par Bugs Bunny cartoon - were before Bugs and his Scottish foe played.

Even though it's been used before, it's always fun to see Bugs appear out of some hole and discover he's not close to where he thought he was going. This time he's WAY off target, across the ocean in Scotland. Bugs uses his normal line, "I knew I should have taken a left at Albuquerque."

Upon spotting a Scotsman wearing kilts and playing the bagpipes (talk about stereotyping!), Bugs jumps on the bagpipes and ruins them. He thought it was mugger beating up on an old lady, the kilts confusing him. Then, when he finds out what's what, Bugs changes his normal opening line to, "What's up, MacDoc?"

The two get into it and the Scotsman challenges him to a game of golf to save his honor. The match features all kinds of cheating and holes-in-one. As mentioned above, this is below par....or should I rephrase that to "over par." Most Bugs Bunny cartoons are pars and birdies, but this one's a bogey.
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Golf anyone?
smicalef15 January 2001
When Bugs takes that oh-so-famous right turn when he should have went left, he ends up in Scotland instead of the Labrea Tar Pits. The best ever game of golf ever seen on T.V. against a Scottish bag-pipe player ensues. Definitely for any Bugs fan whose ever played a round of golf. I only wish i could pull some of those stunts on the links. 10 out of 10.
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7/10
"What's up, MacDoc?"
utgard1414 September 2015
Classic Bugs short, directed by the great Chuck Jones, has Bugs tunneling to Scotland after making one of his infamous wrong turns at Albuquerque. He tackles with angry Scotsman Angus MacRory, resulting in a funny golf match between the two. Many good gags in this one and some fun lines from Bugs and Angus. The animation is bright and colorful with well-drawn characters and backgrounds. The music is lively and upbeat. Wonderful voice work from the incomparable Mel Blanc. I would say most Bugs fans will like it as much as I do but, judging by some of the reviews here, that's not the case. Oh well, can't please everybody I guess. I thought it was good.
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good, but i was dissapointed
movieman_kev20 July 2004
Bugs Bunny takes another one of his famous wrong turns and ends up in Scotland, where he mistakes MacRory the Scotsman playing the bagpipes as a monster attacking an old woman and promptly destroys said bagpipes thus infuriating MacRory who challenges Bugs to a game of golf in this Chuck Jones Directed and Michael Maltese written Looney Tunes short. I'm somewhat dissapointed with this short, not because it's bad in any way, just because when I usually catch this writer/director team (either together or on their own), I'm treated to something very special and this short let me down. This cartoon is the eleventh short on disk 1 of the 'Loony Tunes Golden Collection'.

My Grade: B-
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9/10
My Bunny Lies Over the Sea is another funny Chuck Jones Bugs Bunny cartoon
tavm31 December 2007
Having once again realized he "should've taken that left turn at Albuquerque", Bugs winds up in Scotland where he already finds trouble when he mistakes a Scotsman in his kilts playing a bagpipe for an old lady being attacked by a monster and "kills" the instrument. From there, insults fly fast as the kilt-wearing man whose voice partially resembles Yosemite Sam challenges the rabbit to a game of golf. As with Sam, Bugs changes one word that makes his opponent accept one of his plays as a "hole-in-one" despite fifty-five tries! None of the stuff Bugs does would be acceptable in the golf rule book but they're pretty hilarious nonetheless! That last gag is a topper! Another funny outing from Chuck Jones and Michael Maltese.
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9/10
When President Hussein ordered . . .
tadpole-596-91825627 November 2016
Warning: Spoilers
. . . each North Carolina public school to offer 31 separate bathrooms to accommodate all of his Sex-of-the-Month Clubbers, he opened up the Can of Worms with which Bugs Bunny fiddles during MY BUNNY LIES OVER THE SEA. This story takes place in that mixed up portion of Britain which nixed Brexit. Bugs calls the Scotchguards on the carpet for skirting their congenital conditions. Adding insult to injury, these bearded belles insist upon wailing into windbags likely to be harboring lethal doses of malign microbes. On top of that, they're prone to fritter away all their time puttering around a playing field set up as a Rapist's Paradise, with 18 undefended holes ripe for attacking. Whereas baseball has nine guys available to catch balls, with hockey and soccer employing goalies to swat orbs away, as football and basketball rely on the entire team to do the same thing, the Scotch are shooting fish in a bucket, using up to a dozen specialty sticks to accomplish what Bryce Harper does with one, or LeBron James manages to do with his bare hands (that is, score). Nevertheless, Bugs Bunny's Scot antagonist thinks he's a Big Man here every time he's able to cram his dimpled egg into a poor, defenseless opening.
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8/10
Have no fear, Chicago "Miracle Mile" shoppers . . .
oscaralbert4 January 2016
Warning: Spoilers
. . . that your 200-mile round trips from the suburbs again will be just so much wasted time and gas (due to the fact that this part of America's Windy City is a police "No Go" zone, where the Government is totally powerless to oppose Anti-Christmas Economic Terrorists--or ET's--eager to harm as many random Middle Class Citizens as they can over some perceived slight dating back to the arrival of slaves in VIRGINIA in the early 1600s that the ancestors of Chicago's would-be shoppers fought and died to FREE!), and that "the other shoe" could drop at any moment if the ET's are further incensed by a life-time PGA ban of one of their role models for his serial cheating popping up on TV tournament golf broadcasts in recent years: during MY BUNNY LIES OVER THE SEA, Bugs Bunny demonstrates the 50 ways to Shave Your Scorecard, and cites the cases of Kaduffleblaze vs. Fuddle (Hebrides Open, 1918), Fraddis vs. Grisfritter (Private Match, No Year Given), as well as Bizbu vs. Stoigen (Casablanca Amateur, No Year Given) to establish that Golf has been The Liars' "Sport" since its earliest beginnings in Scotland, and is generally what you would expect from a nation where the men wear the skirts and do the (bagpipe) wailing!
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6/10
Below par Bugs
Tweekums23 September 2009
This Bugs Bunny short opened promisingly when he finds himself in Scotland instead of Los Angeles following a wrong turn in Albequerque (where else?). He spots a kilt wearing Scotsman playing the bagpipes and assumes it was actually a woman being attacked by some strange creature, Bugs promptly attacks the pipes and destroys them and is shocked to find that the old lady is in fact a man. Not surprisingly the man takes offence at Bug's actions and challenges him to a game of golf... this is where things go wrong. The game takes up too much of the cartoon and while it had some funny parts others just seemed silly, even for a cartoon.
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Bugs
Michael_Elliott12 April 2009
My Bunny Lies Over the Sea (1948)

** (out of 4)

Lesser short from the Looney Tunes series has Bugs Bunny ending up in Scotland where he destroys a man's bagpipes so he gets challenged at a game of golf. This has never been one of my favorites and it was actually even weaker than I remembered it being. There are really two jokes in this short with the first half dealing with Scotland and the second half dealing with golf. Neither contain any major laugh even though both halves feature some nice imagination. While the imagination is nice none of it ever captures too many laughs as most of the jokes fall flat on their face. The final joke of the film isn't too bad but this is easily one that could be skipped.
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4/10
A weak, slow moving cartoon hampered by the introduction of a golf tournament
phantom_tollbooth18 August 2008
Chuck Jones' 'My Bunny Lies Over the Sea' is an odd cartoon due to its setting and its premise. That easily missed left turn at Albuquerque somehow finds Bugs Bunny arriving in Scotland instead of Los Angeles. Here he encounters a fiery red haired Scotsman (a sort of Scottish Yosemite Sam but with bagpipes instead of shooting irons) who he accidentally offends in the best gag of the cartoon. From here, however, 'My Bunny…' slows down considerably as the unusual plot point of a golf tournament is introduced. The golf course is not an ideal setting for Bugs' heckling and the rest of the script attempts to find a way around this self imposed obstacle. The excellent and fast paced Tom and Jerry cartoon 'Tee for Two' showed that the golf course is a rich source of comedy material but sadly 'My Bunny…' struggles to tap into it, resorting to predictable jokes about digging bigger holes and deliberately misjudging your score. Another problem with the cartoon is the underdeveloped Scotsman character who is basically just a walking stereotype with a terrible accent (As you can probably imagine, I'm not a big Speedy Gonzales fan!). He's not fun to be with for the audience or Bugs, who has little to work with. 'My Bunny Lies Over the Sea' is an altogether weak effort, even robbed of the traditional cartoon brightness by its realistically dingy Scottish setting.
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6/10
What's up MacDoc?
As usual, Bugs Bunny gets hopelessly lost when tunneling to his latest vacation (the La Brea tar pits). This time he ends up in Scotland and mistakes a (stereo)typical 'Scotsman' playing the bagpipes for an old lady being mauled by a monster. Bugs promptly jumps to her rescue and smashes the pipes to tiny little bits.

Naturally the Scotsman (named MacRory and a thinly disguised Yosemite Sam)gets very angry at the smashing of said beloved pipes and, instead of a duel, challenges Bugs to a rather unfunny game of golf. Bugs does his usual outsmarting and nasty tricks but none are really too imaginative or clever. We've seen Bugs to better than this.
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5/10
Is this for real?
Richie the G1 March 2002
There were too many holes-in-one on this golf match, and it is uncharacteristic of Bugs Bunny not to know that opponents must spot their balls on the green before he is to putt. Funny was the part when Bugs was disguised as an old Scotsman property owner.
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