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Morgan Neville on the Multitudes of Orson Welles and How ‘The Other Side of the Wind’ is a Critique of Machismo

Twenty years after making the TV documentary The Hustons: Hollywood’s Maverick Dynasty, Morgan Neville returned to Huston and Orson Welles lore with They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead, about the making, unmaking, and resurrection of The Other Side of the Wind.

Neville joined the producing team of Frank Marshall, Peter Bogdanovich, and Filip Jan Rymsza sometime before the project’s crowd-funding campaign. The producers promised to finish the film and Neville committed to telling this part of Orson’s story.

In our conservation with Morgan Neville, we discuss Hollywood’s abandonment of Orson Welles; even mega-producer Frank Marshall’s involvement couldn’t procure the necessary budget to finish the film for decades. He also talks about the multitude of contradictory personalities Welles held throughout his life, and he comments on the stark contrast between Welles and Mr. Rogers, the other person of interest in his hit documentary.
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Shining, Rebecca, and Jurassic Park Selected for the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress

  • DailyDead
Founded 30 years ago, the National Film Registry has annually added 25 movies to its archives for preservation based on their "cultural, historic and aesthetic importance to the nation’s film heritage," and this year's selections are no exception. The 25 new additions to the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress were revealed today, including a trio of movies (all of them book adaptations) that should warm the hearts of horror and suspense fans: Stanley Kubrick's The Shining, Steven Spielberg's Jurassic Park, and Alfred Hitchcock's Rebecca.

Read on for an excerpt from the Library of Congress' official press release, and visit their website for full details on their 2018 selections.

From the Press Release: "Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced today the annual selection of 25 of America’s most influential motion pictures to be inducted into the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress because of their cultural,
See full article at DailyDead »

Jurassic Park, The Shining and 23 More Added to the National Film Registry

The National Film Registry has announced the 25 movies that have been selected for preservation in the Library of Congress for 2018. These movies have been deemed culturally, historically or aesthetically important, and will now be preserved for years to come. The titles this year are wide-ranging and include movies such as Jurassic Park, The Shining and titles dating back to the early 1900s.

Alfred Hitchcock's first American movie Rebecca has been selected, as well as Orson Welles The Lady From Shanghai. It was a big year for iconic directors, with Steven Spielberg and Stanley Kubrick also getting their previously mentioned classics included, as well as John Ford getting his record-setting eleventh movie, The Informer, included in the Library of Congress. Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden had this to say in a statement.

"The National Film Registry turns 30 this year, and for those three decades, we have been recognizing, celebrating and preserving this distinctive medium.
See full article at MovieWeb »

‘Jurassic Park,’ ‘The Shining,’ ‘Monterey Pop’ Added to National Film Registry

‘Jurassic Park,’ ‘The Shining,’ ‘Monterey Pop’ Added to National Film Registry
Steven Spielberg’s Jurassic Park, Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining and D.A. Pennebaker’s concert film Monterey Pop were among the 25 films added to the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry, which recognizes motion pictures that are “culturally, historically or aesthetically” significant.

“The National Film Registry turns 30 this year and for those three decades, we have been recognizing, celebrating and preserving this distinctive medium,” Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden said Thursday. “These cinematic treasures must be protected because they document our history, culture, hopes and dreams.”

“It was for us a vast undertaking,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘The Shining,’ ‘Brokeback Mountain,’ and 23 More Titles Added to National Film Registry

The Library of Congress has announced the 25 films joining the National Film Registry in 2018. The most well-known titles in this year’s group include Ang Lee’s “Brokeback Mountain,” Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining,” Alfred Hitchcock’s “Rebecca,” Steven Spielberg’s “Jurassic Park,” and James L. Brooks’ “Broadcast News.” Films that make the cut have been deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” and will be preserved under the terms of the National Film Preservation Act.

“The National Film Registry turns 30 this year and for those three decades, we have been recognizing, celebrating, and preserving this distinctive medium,” said Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. “These cinematic treasures must be protected because they document our history, culture, hopes, and dreams.”

With the 25 new additions, the National Film Registry now has a total of 750 titles. “Brokeback Mountain,” released in 2005, is the most recently released film to be added to the Registry this year.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Shining,’ ‘Rebecca,’ ‘Brokeback Mountain,’ ‘The Lady From Shanghai’ & More Added to National Film Registry

Since 1989, the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress has been accomplishing the important task of preserving films that “represent important cultural, artistic and historic achievements in filmmaking.” From films way back in 1897 all the way up to 2005, they’ve now reached 750 films that celebrate our heritage and encapsulate our film history.

Today they’ve unveiled their 2018 list, which includes Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining, Ang Lee’s Brokeback Mountain, Alfred Hitchcock’s Rebecca, and Orson WellesThe Lady From Shanghai. There’s also Steven Spielberg’s blockbuster behemoth Jurassic Park, Samuel Fuller’s stellar noir Pickup on South Street, the riveting, harrowing documentary Hearts and Minds, and much more.

Check out the full list below and you can watch some films on the registry for free here.

1. Bad Day at Black Rock (1955)

2. Broadcast News (1987)

3. Brokeback Mountain (2005)

4. Cinderella (1950)

5. Days of Wine and Roses (1962)

6. Dixon-Wanamaker Expedition to Crow Agency

7. Eve
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Jurassic Park,’ ‘The Shining’ and ‘Brokeback Mountain’ Added to National Film Registry

  • The Wrap
‘Jurassic Park,’ ‘The Shining’ and ‘Brokeback Mountain’ Added to National Film Registry
Jurassic Park,” “My Fair Lady,” “Brokeback Mountain” and “The Shining” were among the 25 American films inducted into the National Film Registry, Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced Wednesday.

Selection to the registry will help ensure that these films will be preserved for all time because of their cultural, historic and aesthetic importance to the nation’s film heritage.

“The National Film Registry turns 30 this year and for those three decades, we have been recognizing, celebrating and preserving this distinctive medium,” Hayden said. “These cinematic treasures must be protected because they document our history, culture, hopes and dreams.”

Also Read: 'Titanic,' 'The Goonies,' 'Superman' Added to National Film Registry

This year’s films span 107 years, from 1898 to 2005. They include blockbusters, documentaries, silent movies, animation and independent films. The 2018 selections bring the number of films in the registry to 750, a small fraction of the Library’s
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Brokeback Mountain,’ ‘Jurassic Park,’ ‘My Fair Lady’ Added to National Film Registry

  • Variety
‘Brokeback Mountain,’ ‘Jurassic Park,’ ‘My Fair Lady’ Added to National Film Registry
Brokeback Mountain,” “Jurassic Park,” “My Fair Lady,” “The Shining,” “Hud” and “Monterey Pop” are among the best known titles among this year’s additions to the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.

A place on the list — always made up of 25 films — guarantees the film will be preserved under the terms of the National Film Preservation Act. The criteria for selection is that the movies are “culturally, historically or aesthetically” significant.

“The National Film Registry turns 30 this year and for those three decades, we have been recognizing, celebrating and preserving this distinctive medium,” said Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. “These cinematic treasures must be protected because they document our history, culture, hopes and dreams.”

The 2018 selections bring the total number of films in the registry to 750. Hayden will discuss the 25 new films with Leonard Maltin on Turner Classic Movies at 8 p.m. E.T. Wednesday.

The new titles
See full article at Variety »

The Orson Also Rises: A Brief History of Rescuing ‘The Other Side of the Wind’

The Orson Also Rises: A Brief History of Rescuing ‘The Other Side of the Wind’
It begins with a death — a car accident that takes the life of a legendary director on his 70th birthday — and ends with a giant phallic symbol toppling over. In between those two moments, you get young film critics arguing, old actors kvetching, a Jim Morrison doppelganger, a naked woman wandering around an abandoned back lot, John Huston dispensing insults by a swimming pool, an orgy in a public bathroom, mannequins being used for target practice, empty drive-in theaters and the world’s greatest sex scene in a moving car.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Filming sensations by Anne-Katrin Titze

Mathieu Amalric‬ on directing Barbara: "There would be immediately a presence. It was the spirit we were waiting for." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

At the Regency Hotel on Park Avenue over breakfast, Mathieu Amalric discussed with me Pierre Léon's initial involvement with Barbara, Jeanne Balibar's performance, a clip from Jacques Brel's film Franz, an Orson Welles' The Lady From Shanghai moment, and filming sensations.

Mathieu Amalric will soon be seen as Dr. Paul Gachet in Julian Schnabel’s At Eternity’s Gate (Closing Night film of the 56th New York Film Festival), co-written with Jean-Claude Carrière and Louise Kugelberg, shot by Benoît Delhomme, and starring Willem Dafoe as Vincent van Gogh, with Oscar Isaac as Paul Gauguin, Rupert Friend as Theo, Emmanuelle Seigner, Mads Mikkelsen, and Niels Arestrup.

Carlotta (Marion Cotillard) with Ismael (Mathieu Amalric) in Arnaud Desplechin's Ismael's Ghosts (Les Fantômes D'Ismaël)

Mathieu is also the
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Dwayne Johnson: Stuck Between The Rock and a Hard Place

Dwayne Johnson: Stuck Between The Rock and a Hard Place
There was a moment in Skyscraper when I realized the movie had pretty much lost me. It wasn’t the scene in which Dwayne Johnson hurls himself through the slicing-and-dicing propellers of a gigantic wind turbine, just to reach a switch that has been incomprehensibly hidden there. Nor was it the scene in which he flies through the air, hundreds of feet above the ground, then catches a rope and swings Tarzan-like to safety. And it wasn’t the hall-of-mirrors sequence, an ancient movie trope familiar from such classics as Orson WellesThe Lady from Shanghai, in which the bad ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

‘Skyscraper’ Film Review: Dwayne Johnson Checks All the Boxes in a Satisfying Summer Thriller

  • The Wrap
‘Skyscraper’ Film Review: Dwayne Johnson Checks All the Boxes in a Satisfying Summer Thriller
“Skyscraper” doesn’t expand the scope or the rules of the summer action blockbuster, but it does follow the recipe in a supremely satisfying way.

So yes, you’ll recognize the DNA of other movies here — not just obvious antecedents like “Die Hard” and “The Towering Inferno,” but also “Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol” and even “The Lady from Shanghai” — but that familiarity won’t interfere with the vertiginous thrills, the breathtaking stunts (and CG), and the near-constant state of adrenaline-fueled action.

Writer-director Rawson Marshall Thurber (“Central Intelligence”) sets up the pins to knock them down later: there’s nothing we learn in the first 10 minutes of the film that won’t come up again in the last 10 minutes. Still, he sets up an impressive array of obstacles, as well as characters who are solid enough to overcome them.

Watch Video: 'Skyscraper' Trailer Shows Dwayne Johnson Can Still Kick
See full article at The Wrap »

One Orson Welles Movie Made It to Cannes: Mark Cousins’ Love Letter ‘The Eyes of Orson Welles’

One Orson Welles Movie Made It to Cannes: Mark Cousins’ Love Letter ‘The Eyes of Orson Welles’
Cannes Classics 2018’s opening nighter is Irish filmmaker Mark Cousins’ intimate documentary “The Eyes of Orson Welles,” which was invited to Cannes before Netflix pulled its own two Welles entries, the completed “The Other Side of the Wind” and Morgan Neville’s accompanying Welles documentary “They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead.”

Cousins (“The Story of Film: An Odyssey”) narrates his charming love letter to the late Welles, which is the first original film backed by the Filmstruck and TCM partnership (as well as the BBC and other funders), and is for sale to Cannes buyers.

“I’m interested in a more personal voice,” he said in a phone interview from Scotland, “in what happens when you look someone in the eye, as it were, and address them directly. It’s a more intimate and emotional language.”

He first adopted letter-writing on “Eisenstein and Lawrence,” his 2016 documentary short about
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

One Orson Welles Movie Made It to Cannes: Mark Cousins’ Love Letter ‘The Eyes of Orson Welles’

One Orson Welles Movie Made It to Cannes: Mark Cousins’ Love Letter ‘The Eyes of Orson Welles’
Cannes Classics 2018’s opening nighter is Irish filmmaker Mark Cousins’ intimate documentary “The Eyes of Orson Welles,” which was invited to Cannes before Netflix pulled its own two Welles entries, the completed “The Other Side of the Wind” and Morgan Neville’s accompanying Welles documentary “They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead.”

Cousins (“The Story of Film: An Odyssey”) narrates his charming love letter to the late Welles, which is the first original film backed by the Filmstruck and TCM partnership (as well as the BBC and other funders), and is for sale to Cannes buyers.

“I’m interested in a more personal voice,” he said in a phone interview from Scotland, “in what happens when you look someone in the eye, as it were, and address them directly. It’s a more intimate and emotional language.”

He first adopted letter-writing on “Eisenstein and Lawrence,” his 2016 documentary short about
See full article at Indiewire »

A Weakness for Complexity: An Interview with the Philosopher George M. Wilson

  • MUBI
In the late 1970s, an associate professor in the Philosophy department at Johns Hopkins (thesis title: "The Nature of the Natural Numbers") began publishing essays on Hollywood movies. George M. Wilson wasn't the first person to undergo this shift in specialism. At the start of the decade, Stanley Cavell had published The World Viewed, a series of "reflections on the ontology of film." But Cavell had always been concerned with how works of art enable us to think through philosophical themes such as knowledge and meaning, and he held a chair, at Harvard, in Aesthetics. Wilson differed in that he brought a range of analytic gifts to an ongoing revolution: the close reading of American cinema, conceived as part of the "auteur" policy of Truffaut and other writers at Cahiers du cinéma in the 1950s, and concertedly developed in the following decades by critics in England such as V. F.
See full article at MUBI »

Great Job, Internet!: Let’s remember San Francisco’s glorious history as the home of film noir

In the peak American film noir years from 1940 to 1960, an astonishing number of these movies took place in the scenic west coast city of San Francisco. Fandor’s new video, “Shadows In The Fog: Classic San Francisco Film Noir” points out that as many as 70 of these films were set in the city by the bay, including classics like John Huston’s version of the The Maltese Falcon, which kicked off the genre in 1941. Orson Welles followed in 1947 with The Lady From Shanghai, which featured scenes in the city’s famous aquarium and a suspenseful footrace through Chinatown.

That same year saw Humphrey Bogart’s return to San Fran to hide out after an escape from San Quentin in Dark Passage, highlighted by director Delmer Daves’ native knowledge of the city, as well as Robert Mitchum’s noir classic Out Of The Past. All of ...
See full article at The AV Club »

David Bowie and the Indestructible Metaphors of Mirror Scenes

A video essay examines our most private moments.

Strap on your thinking caps for this one, film fans, because it’s a doozy.

According to director Nicolas Roeg (The Man Who Fell to Earth, Don’t Look Now, The Witches), mirrors are cinema in all its glory and in fact the essence of the medium. See, mirrors are the only time we truly look at ourselves; photographs of us are from other perspectives, for other people or posterity, and as such we don’t show our real faces in them, we show projections of who we think we should be or how we think we should feel in a certain situation. But the mirror isn’t public, it’s private, it is us alone with ourselves and thus the way we look into mirrors, into ourselves, is different from every other face we show the world.

The mirror is an eye, Roeg
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

'John Wick: Chapter 2' Review: Keanu Reeves Is Back in Delirious, Mayhem-Filled Sequel

'John Wick: Chapter 2' Review: Keanu Reeves Is Back in Delirious, Mayhem-Filled Sequel
Remember how the original John Wick snuck up and wowed us in 2014? Now he's back and better than ever. John Wick: Chapter 2 is the real deal in action-movie fireworks – it's pure cinema, an adrenaline rocket of image and sound that explodes on contact.

Wait, say the skeptics, isn't it just Keanu Reeves, as the titular character, shooting, stabbing, kicking and punching bad guys when he's not using assorted vehicles to go Mad Max on his enemies? Well, yes, it's that too. And yet this sequel – with the star at
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘John Wick: Chapter 2’ Review: Keanu Reeves Kicks Ass (Again), And the Franchise Has Begun

‘John Wick: Chapter 2’ Review: Keanu Reeves Kicks Ass (Again), And the Franchise Has Begun
If you’ve seen “John Wick,” you know the legend: One time, the eponymous hitman (Keanu Reeves) killed three men in a bar with a pencil. “With a fucking pencil,” growls a Russian crime boss played by Peter Stormare in the opening minutes of “John Wick: Chapter 2,” moments before the unstoppable killing machine nicknamed “The Boogeyman” bursts through the door. Before Stormare can finish the anecdote, one of his lackeys interrupts him. “I know,” he says. “I’ve heard this one before.”

In the “John Wick” universe of action-movie pastiche, even the villains are fans of his work. And who could blame them? Overseen by the original “John Wick” team of director Chad Stahelski and screenwriter Derek Kolstad, the new movie contains the best ingredients of the 2014 original with a fresh set of outrageous showdowns, and even improves on its commitment to cartoonish mayhem in self-serious clothing. As relentless,
See full article at Indiewire »

Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Dekalog,’ ‘The Shallows,’ ‘The Neon Demon,’ and More

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Dekalog (Krzysztof Kieślowski)

Despite passing away at the all-too-young age of 54, Krzysztof Kieślowski invoked a sense of humanity that even today’s greatest directors might need a lifetime to achieve. What would be his defining masterwork (if he didn’t make a number of films that could also easily fall under the definition), the 10-part Dekalog, has been restored thanks to Janus Films and is now available on The Criterion Collection after touring the country. Also including interviews with those involved and more,
See full article at The Film Stage »
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