7.0/10
1,381
8 user 12 critic

L'amore (1948)

In the first episode, a heartbroken woman talks to her ex-lover on the phone. In the second, a pregnant woman believes she is carrying the child of Saint Joseph.

Director:

Roberto Rossellini

Writers:

Jean Cocteau (play), Federico Fellini (story) | 4 more credits »
Reviews
2 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview:
Anna Magnani ... La donna al telefono (segment "Una voce umana") / Nannina (segment "Il miracolo")
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Storyline

In part one, The Human Voice, a woman alone speaks on the telephone to her lover, who has broken off the affair to marry someone else. He calls her several times in one night: he lies, she apologizes, she takes the blame, she weeps, she pleads, she asks a favor. Her pain and desperation drive the simple story. In part two, The Miracle, a homeless woman believes that a man she encounters on a hillside is Saint Joseph; he takes advantage of her. When she discovers she is pregnant, she knows it's a miracle. Other villagers mock her, and she has the baby alone, near a locked church, in the straw of a goat shed. Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In New york, Rossellini was charged with blasphemy by Cardinal Spellman but defended by the Protestants. See more »

Quotes

La donna al telefono (segment "Una voce umana"): What? My black satin dress. Yes, I'm still wearing it. No, I didn't smoke. Just three cigarettes. I swear
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Connections

Version of La voz humana: La voz humana (1986) See more »

User Reviews

The film that broke America's freedom of cinema.
23 September 2000 | by BozoSee all my reviews

When it was scheduled to be shown in New York, L' Amore was protested by religious leaders led by Cardinal Francis Spellman. The film board of New York quickly yanked it before even hitting the screen. After viewing this case, the Supreme Court ruled that for the first time that films are "a significant medium for the communication of ideas." It wasn't until this point that the First Amendment covered film as a freedom of speech. This didn't stop censorship, but it did open new doors.


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Details

Country:

Italy

Language:

Italian

Release Date:

28 March 1956 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Amore See more »

Filming Locations:

Paris, France See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Finecine, Tevere Film See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (restored)

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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