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On this day in pop culture history: Both ‘Ghostbusters’ and ‘Gremlins’ premiered

  • Hitfix
On this day in pop culture history: Both ‘Ghostbusters’ and ‘Gremlins’ premiered
It was 32 years ago today that not one but two classic horror comedies opened in theaters. Yes, Ghostbusters was released on the same day as Gremlins. It’s hard to believe that these two movies opened against each other, but 1984 was a different time, when opening weekend numbers weren’t given the same weight as they are now and films stayed in theaters much longer. Ghostbusters that dominated the U.S. box office that opening weekend but not by much — it earned $13.6 million then, while Gremlins grossed $12.5 million. The Bill Murray movie became the clear winner of the box office over the summer, though, holding the No. 1 spot for seven consecutive weeks. Ghostbusters, of course, has a very buzzy and headline-grabbing (for better or worse or mass hysteria) follow-up film on the way this summer, a reboot of the original. There’s reportedly a new Gremlins on the way too:
See full article at Hitfix »

Jack Carter, Emmy-Nominated Comic Actor, Dead at 93

Jack Carter, Emmy-Nominated Comic Actor, Dead at 93
Jack Carter, a veteran comedic performer and director, died Sunday of respiratory failure at his home in Beverly Hills. He was 93. The Brooklyn native worked in a variety of media over his decades-long career, from radio and Broadway to TV and film. He got his first break when appearing on Milton Berle’s “Texaco Star Theatre” in the late 1940s, then hosted NBC’s “Cavalcade of Stars” and the eponymous “The Jack Carter Show” for three years. Also Read: Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2015 (Photos) Carter received an Emmy nomination in 1975 for the daytime movie special “The Girl Who Couldn’t Lose.
See full article at The Wrap »

Jack Carter, Comedic Actor and Calvacade of Stars Host, Dead at 93

Jack Carter, Comedic Actor and Calvacade of Stars Host, Dead at 93
Jack Carter, a comedian whose nearly seventy-year career encompassed fare as diverse as Cavalcade of Stars and iCarly, is dead at the age of 93.

Carter died of respiratory failure on Sunday, June 28, at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif., our sister site Variety reports.

The actor — who also worked as a singer, director and emcee — got his TV break in Milton Berle’s Texaco Star Theatre in 1948, from which he built a long career as a character actor who appeared in TV fare as varied as I Dream of Jeannie, Fantasy Island and Desperate Housewives.

A contemporary of Jimmy Durante,
See full article at TVLine.com »

Your Show of Shows: Comic Legend Sid Caesar Dies at 91

A true television legend has died. Sid Caesar, who influenced generations of comedy writers and performers, passed away earlier today in Los Angeles. He was 91 years old.

Born to immigrant parents in 1922, Caesar made his first television appearance on Milton Berle's Texaco Star Theater in the late 40's. He soon met NBC president Pat Weaver and landed his first TV series, The Admiral Broadway Revue, with Imogene Coca.

In 1950, he appeared on the first episode of Your Show of Shows, a 90-minute variety show. The series featured comedy sketches, satires, monologues, musical guests and production numbers -- an early predecessor to Saturday Night Live (which Caesar guest-hosted in 1983). On-screen talent included Caesar, Carl Reiner, Howard Morris, and Imogene Coca. Backstage, the show's legendary writing staff included Mel Brooks, Neil Simon, Mel Tolkin and Danny Simon.

Your Show of
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

R.I.P. Sid Caesar

TV pioneer Sid Caesar has died at the age of 91 in Los Angeles. The Yonkers, NY-born comedian made his first appearance on TV in 1949 on Milton Berle’s Texaco Star Theater. On February 25, 1950, Caesar was among the ensemble cast on the premiere of Your Show Of Shows. With Caesar, Imogene Coca and Carl Reiner in front of the camera and Mel Brooks, Neil Simon, Larry Gelbart, Mel Tolkin and Danny Simon among the writers, the 90-minute weekly NBC show became one of early TV’s biggest hits, running until June 1954, and served as a launching pad for future TV comedy talent — with proteges spawning protoges through the years. Ceasar moved on to topline several shows: the one-hour satirical Caesar’s Hour debuted just a few months later and ran until 1957, followed by 1958’s The Sid Caesar Show, which had Woody Allen as a writer. He starred in a series of
See full article at Deadline TV »

It’s Not TV: HBO, The Company That Changed Television: The Wasteland

The Wasteland:

Television is a gold goose that lays scrambled eggs;

and it is futile and probably fatal to beat it for not laying caviar.

Lee Loevinger

When people argue over the quality of television programming, both sides — it’s addictive crap v. underappreciated populist art — seem to forget one of the essentials about commercial TV. By definition, it is not a public service. It is not commercial TV’s job to enlighten, inform, educate, elevate, inspire, or offer insight. Frankly, it’s not even commercial TV’s job to entertain. Bottom line: its purpose is simply to deliver as many sets of eyes to advertisers as possible. As it happens, it tends to do this by offering various forms of entertainment, and occasionally by offering content that does enlighten, inform, etc., but a cynic would make the point that if TV could do the same job televising fish aimlessly swimming around an aquarium,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Milton Berle's filing cabinets full of jokes are going up for auction

Four filing cabinets filled with index cards holding the late Milton Berle’s jokes are going up for auction next week. Each cabinet contains jokes typewritten onto 3x5 index cards then divided into subjects (kind of like what Joan Rivers showed off in A Piece Of Work). According to the auction house, Berle “meticulously maintained” the joke file over his whole career, and he considered it “to be the most valuable resource in his office.” Some of the cards, for example, feature potential monologue bits from The Milton Berle Show’s 1966-67 run on ABC. Those cards have little notes ...
See full article at The AV Club »

6 things you may not know about Jimmy Fallon and 'Late Night'

Jimmy Fallon took center stage at the 2011 PaleyFest Friday night (March 11), and this time he was the interviewee, not the interviewer.

Fallon was the sole guest at the festival, submitting to an easygoing, funny and clip-filled interview with his friend, comedian and "Web Soup" host Chris Hardwick. He talked a lot about how he puts together "Late Night with Jimmy Fallon," the type of people he likes to work with (he hired his writers "based on their talent, not their resumes") and about his career leading up to "Late Night," including his time on "Saturday Night Live."

He also shared a few things we didn't previously know. Depending on your level of Fallon fanaticism, some of these things might be familiar to you. But we thought found the following six tidbits pretty interesting.

1. He didn't pass his first "Saturday Night Live" audition. Producers liked his audition bit -- as part of his early stand-up act,
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Jackson's '84 Victory Tour glove sells for $190K

Bidders from around the world bought up Michael Jackson memorabilia worth nearly $1 million at an auction on the anniversary of his death, including $190,000 for the Swarovski-crystal-studded glove he wore on his 1984 Victory Tour.The bidding that began Friday on more than 200 items was "unlike anything we've ever experienced," said Darren Julien of Julien's Auctions, which ran the auction at Planet Hollywood in Las Vegas.Some items, like the glove, brought 10 times more than their estimated value, he said."It just shows you Michael Jackson is the most sought after and most collectible celebrity of all time. It was just phenomenal," Julien told the Las Vegas Review-Journal."People flew in from Asia, Russia, all over. Now that he's gone, we now realize the true legend we lost," said Julien, who has not had a similar auction in his 15 years in the business. He predicted the
See full article at Filmicafe »

How Adam Carolla Became a Podcast Superstar

Adam Carolla is a master builder who created this glass office. His next project? Building his podcast network to profitability. | Photographs by Jeff Minton

Carolla, midrant, at his warehouse/studio, in Glendale, California | Photographs by Jeff Minton

Radio-and-tv personality Adam Carolla stumbled into podcasting and immediately became its No. 1 star. Now he's launching his own broadcasting network. Inside the messy birth of a new medium.

Adam Carolla has done the math. The comedian, actor, and multimedia ranter is studying what appears to be a trap door in the ceiling of the garage he personally helped build for his West Hollywood home. He's scowling.

Somewhere above the opening is his office, a glass box he added to the 1929 Spanish-style mansion he assiduously restored from near-wreck conditions. The office, a modernistic anomaly when compared with the rest of the house, was designed to do one thing: showcase one of Carolla's many expensive vintage cars,
See full article at Fast Company »

Arnold Stang, voice of Top Cat, dead at 91

  • Aol TV.
Arnold Stang, voice of Top Cat, dead at 91
When I was a kid, I loved the cartoon Top Cat. I'm not sure why. Maybe it was the cool music or the fact it was set in New York City. I also really loved Top Cat's voice.

Arnold Stang, the voice of the clever feline, died earlier this week at the age of 91. Stang was in 75 gazillion TV shows and movies over the years (you'd know the face and/or the voice even if you couldn't place the name), including The Jonathan Winters Show, Broadside, Batman, Bonanza, The Red Skelton Show, December Bride, The Steve Allen Show, The Milton Berle Show, Emergency, and Mathnet.

He was also in several movies, including Hercules in New York, Dennis The Menace, and It's A Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World. He was also the original voice of Buzz Bee in Honey-Nut Cheerios commercials.

After the jump, an episode of Top Cat.

Continue reading Arnold Stang,
See full article at Aol TV. »

Adam Lambert, My Hero

Adam Lambert, My Hero
A hot young singer's television performance causes a scandal with its in-your-face sexuality never before seen on prime time TV. Television critics and viewers across the country slam the performance for its "appalling lack of musicality," for its "vulgarity" and "animalism." The Catholic Church takes up the criticism in its weekly publication. Concerns about juvenile delinquency and the changing moral values of the young find a new target in the red-hot singer, whose talent is undeniable despite his scandalous stagecraft. I'm talking, of course, about Elvis Presley, whose pelvis-shaking 1956 performance of "Hound Dog" on The Milton Berle Show, of all things, got this very reaction. Adam Lambert should find comfort in this. His wildly controversial performance on the American Music Awards was called everything from "ultra lewd," "disgusting," and "pornographic" to "a delight" and "one of the most awesomely...
See full article at Huffington Post »

Adam Lambert's Ama Performance And Other Shocking Musical TV Moments

From the first gyration of Elvis Presley's hips on "The Milton Berle Show" (way back in the summer of 1955) to the last grab of the crotch during Adam Lambert's Sunday (November 22) night performance at the American Music Awards, musicians and live television have shared a rather contentious relationship.

Throughout the years, in attempts to shock audiences, promote albums or share their political views (or, you know, just because they were inebriated), artists have given censors fits with performances that pushed the boundaries of good taste — everything from bare butts to obscenity and potshots at the Pope. Things like that are the reason they invented the seven-second delay, after all.

So now, with Lambert already feeling the heat following his racy Ama performance, we decided it was a good time to re-visit some of the most shocking musical moments from in TV history — the ones that earned public condemnations and half-hearted apologies.
See full article at MTV Newsroom »

Why Online Branded Entertainment Should Study Soap Operas

With so many companies in the past few years talking about producing online video and other forms of "branded entertainment," I'm amazed by how people often talk about these trends as if they are new. Radio and early television was full of "product placement" and shows produced directly through the subsidy of major brands, such as The Philco Playhouse and Texaco Star Theater. Nowhere has this trend taken greater hold than the soap opera, where the blend of art and commerce is clear from the very title given to the shows. From their early 1930s radio debut and through the "golden era" of broadcast television, soap operas were the consistent daytime juggernaut that fueled experimentation in primetime.

Today, only one soap company remains in the "soap opera" game in that sense, as Procter & Gamble still funds the production of CBS' As the World Turns. However, brands are launching new Web
See full article at Fast Company »

Why Online Branded Entertainment Should Study Soap Operas

With so many companies in the past few years talking about producing online video and other forms of "branded entertainment," I'm amazed by how people often talk about these trends as if they are new. Radio and early television was full of "product placement" and shows produced directly through the subsidy of major brands, such as The Philco Playhouse and Texaco Star Theater. Nowhere has this trend taken greater hold than the soap opera, where the blend of art and commerce is clear from the very title given to the shows. From their early 1930s radio debut and through the "golden era" of broadcast television, soap operas were the consistent daytime juggernaut that fueled experimentation in primetime.

Today, only one soap company remains in the "soap opera" game in that sense, as Procter & Gamble still funds the production of CBS' As the World Turns. However, brands are launching new Web
See full article at Fast Company »

Seth MacFarlane, Fox and Microsoft Team Up for Ad-Free Special

Microsoft Corp. and Fox One announced an ambitious, unique marketing collaboration that will showcase the best of Windows 7, the newest version of Microsoft's operating system that will be available in market on Oct. 22. The cornerstone of the effort is the exclusive Windows 7 sponsorship of an upcoming television event devoted to the comedy of Seth MacFarlane, creator of Family Guy, American Dad! and The Cleveland Show.

Taking the idea of "commercial-free" to the next level, the original Fox variety special Family Guy Presents: Seth & Alex's Almost Live Comedy Show, (working title) airing Sunday, Nov. 8, at 8:30 p.m. Est and Pst and starring MacFarlane and his Family Guy co-star Alex Borstein, will deliver simplicity for viewers -- no commercial ad time, no network promotions and no commercial breaks -- and instead will feature unique Windows 7-branded programming that blends seamlessly with show content. In a network first, MacFarlane and Borstein have
See full article at MovieWeb »

20 Classic TV Shows Get the Stamp of Approval from the Post Office

The Post Office unveiled some very special stamps yesterday morning in Southern California; a set devoted to classic television.

The "Early TV Memories" set of commemorative stamps were launched at a special event at the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences in North Hollywood. The 20 shows that are honored on the stamps are The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet; Alfred Hitchcock Presents; The Burns and Allen Show; The Dinah Shore Show; Dragnet; The Ed Sullivan Show; The Honeymooners; Hopalong Cassidy; Howdy Doody; I Love Lucy; Kukla, Fran and Ollie; Lassie; The Lone Ranger; Perry Mason; The Phil Silvers Show; The Red Skelton Show; Texaco Star Theater; The Tonight Show; The Twilight Zone; and You Bet Your Life.

All of the performers pictured on the stamps are no longer with us. Stars like Sid Caesar would likely also have been honored but Post
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

20 Classic TV Shows Get the Stamp of Approval from the Post Office

The Post Office unveiled some very special stamps yesterday morning in Southern California; a set devoted to classic television.

The "Early TV Memories" set of commemorative stamps were launched at a special event at the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences in North Hollywood. The 20 shows that are honored on the stamps are The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet; Alfred Hitchcock Presents; The Burns and Allen Show; The Dinah Shore Show; Dragnet; The Ed Sullivan Show; The Honeymooners; Hopalong Cassidy; Howdy Doody; I Love Lucy; Kukla, Fran and Ollie; Lassie; The Lone Ranger; Perry Mason; The Phil Silvers Show; The Red Skelton Show; Texaco Star Theater; The Tonight Show; The Twilight Zone; and You Bet Your Life.

All of the performers pictured on the stamps are no longer with us. Stars like Sid Caesar would likely also have been honored but Post Office rules stipulate that a living person can't appear on a stamp.
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Classic TV stamps unveiled

  • Aol TV.
Stamp collecting is something I just never got into (don't worry, I have plenty of other obsessions), but this might be the first time I actually go to my local post office and get a sheet.

Yesterday, 20 new classic TV stamps were unveiled: I Love Lucy, The Twilight Zone, The Ed Sullivan Show, The Tonight Show, The Honeymooners, Texaco Star Theater, Perry Mason, The Lone Ranger, Burns and Allen, Ozzie and Harriet, Hopalong Cassidy, Lassie, Dragnet, You Bet Your Life, The Dinah Shore Show, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Phil Silvers Show, Howdy Doody, The Red Skelton Show, and Kukla, Fran, and Ollie, Continue reading Classic TV stamps unveiled

 

Filed under: Programming, Celebrities, Reality-Free

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See full article at Aol TV. »

Into the Time Machine of a Black-and-White TV

Turning back the hands of time, our friend and comrade in the cause of truth, justice, and beauty, Margo Jefferson, publishes a fond momento in the latest Bookforum irresistibly titled "TV Time in Negroland," wherein she recounts sitting down with her family in the fifties to watch the greatest black entertainers of the era do guest spots on the top variety shows. Idle diversion this wasn't. Under the microscope each performer went. It’s weekend-television time. Sammy Davis Jr. is going to be on The Milton Berle Show. Dorothy Dandridge is going to be on The Jerry Lewis Colgate Comedy Hour. Lena Horne is going to be on The Frank Sinatra Timex Show. These are seminal moments in the viewing mores of the whole nation. After dinner, the four of us gather in the TV room. Our parents are on the couch; Denise and I push the hassocks as near
See full article at Vanity Fair »
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