7.0/10
3,279
44 user 39 critic

T-Men (1947)

Approved | | Crime, Film-Noir, Thriller | 6 March 1948 (UK)
Two US Treasury agents hunt a successful counterfeiting ring.

Director:

Anthony Mann

Writers:

John C. Higgins, Virginia Kellogg (suggested by a story by)
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Nominated for 1 Oscar. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Dennis O'Keefe ... Dennis O'Brien - aka Vannie Harrigan
Mary Meade ... Evangeline - Club Photographer
Alfred Ryder ... Tony Genaro - aka Tony Galvani
Wallace Ford ... The Schemer (as Wally Ford)
June Lockhart ... Mary Genaro
Charles McGraw ... Moxie (as Charles Mc Graw)
Jane Randolph ... Diana Simpson
Art Smith ... Gregg
Herbert Heyes ... Chief Carson
Jack Overman ... Brownie
John Wengraf ... 'Shiv' Triano
Jim Bannon ... Agent Lindsay
William Malten ... Paul Miller
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Storyline

When the American Treasure Department finds that a gang in Los Angeles is making false currency, agents Dennis O'Brien and Tony Genaro are assigned to investigate the counterfeit gang using the identities of Vannie Harrigan and Tony Galvani in Detroit. Along their investigation they join the gang of mobsters trying to discover who the boss behind the scheme is. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

TERRIFIC... and True! See more »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Included among the American Film Institute's 2001 list of 400 movies nominated for the top 100 Most Heart-Pounding American Movies. See more »

Goofs

Although the ship in the final sequence is described in dialog as the Higgins, the name visible on the ship's bow is the Don Anselmo. See more »

Quotes

Dennis O'Brien: Look, I've been thinking this over. I don't go for that killing a T-Man. I don't like this set up and I don't want any part of it.
Moxie: What's the matter, you getting the wim-wams?
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Connections

Featured in The Rules of Film Noir (2009) See more »

User Reviews

 
Cinematography Is The Star Here
24 October 2005 | by ccthemovieman-1See all my reviews

This is one of the better examples of film noir cinematography. Once the introductions are over and the dramatization of the case begins, the film overflows with startling black-and-white contrasts and interesting camera angles. Director Anthony Mann and photographer John Alton were at the top of their game and the DVD transfer enhances their work.

The great camera-work more than makes up for the fact that the story is just so-so, the weakest of the three noirs the two did together on this 3-pack DVD (the others being, He Walked By Night and Raw Deal.) However, it does sport the typically-tough film noir characters and some great suspense over the last 10-15 minutes. What you have to wade through is the boring beginning but staying with it will be rewarding.

I thought the grim story could have used a little warmth, at least some wisecracking with some floozy "dame." But, no molls in this story this is man's gangster film all the way.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Italian

Release Date:

6 March 1948 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

T-Man See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$450,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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