6.1/10
35
4 user 1 critic

Rolling Home (1946)

Approved | | Drama, Western | 1 November 1946 (USA)
A small town minister adopts an orphan boy and his injured rodeo horse.

Director:

William Berke

Writers:

William Berke (story), Edwin V. Westrate (screenplay)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Jean Parker ... Frances Crawford
Russell Hayden ... Reverend David Owens
Pamela Blake ... Pamela Crawford
Raymond Hatton ... Pop Miller
Jo Ann Marlowe Jo Ann Marlowe ... Sandy Crawford (as Jo Anne Marlowe)
Jimmy Conlin ... Grandpa Crawford (as James Conlin)
Robert 'Buzz' Henry ... Gary Miller - Grandson (as Robert Dee 'Buzz' Henry)
Jonathan Hale ... Henry Kane
George Tyne ... Joe
Harry Carey Jr. ... Dobey
William Farnum ... Rodeo Official
Elmo Lincoln ... Racing Official
Milton Parsons ... Charlie Kane
André Charlot André Charlot ... Dr. Clark
Jimmie Dodd ... Cowboy Guitarist (as Jimmy Dodd)
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Storyline

Old time rodeo performer Raymond Hatton and his grandson, (Buzz Henry as Robert Dee 'Buzzy" Henry) arrive in a small town with an injured horse, and local minister Russell Hayden tends the horse's injured leg. Jean Parker, a wealthy but selfish young widow, lives in the town. The church is in debt but the minister's financial problems are eventually solved by the horse winning a surrey race, and the widow whose attitude has been softned by Hatton, Henry and Hayden. This was the first film Harry Carey Jr appeared in as an adult, and was brought about when the just-discharged-from-the-Navy Carey ran into producer William Berke on an Hollywood street corner. Berke, who had produced six sound westerns in the mid-30's starring the elder Carey, offered Carey Jr. a bit in this film. The first film Harry Carey Jr appeared in was in 1921, as an infant in one of his father's silent westerns. Even with a 25-year-gap between his "first" and second film, Carey's 80 years of work in films may be ... Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A STORY OF STOUT WARM HEARTS...OF PEOPLE YOU KNOW OR HOPE TO KNOW (original ad - all caps)

Genres:

Drama | Western

Certificate:

Approved
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

1 November 1946 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Corazones de oro See more »

Filming Locations:

Hollywood, California, USA

Company Credits

Production Co:

Affiliated Productions See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Film debut of Harry Carey Jr. See more »

Soundtracks

The End of the Trail
by Jimmie Dodd (as Jimmie Dodds)
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User Reviews

 
A bit schmaltzy but a nice chance to see Raymond Hatton actually acting.
13 May 2019 | by MartinHaferSee all my reviews

In the 1930s and 40s, Raymond Hatton made a long string of B-westerns....mostly with such franchises as the Three Mesquiteers and the Rough Riders. While these were enjoyable films, they were also rather predictable and gave Hatton an income but little in the way of opportunities to show he could act. When I began watching "Rolling Home", I was surprised as Hatton was cast without the usual gang of heroes...and he showed he could really act. In fact, he was so good I wish he'd made more appearances like this one....so even while it's far from a great film, it's worth your time.

When the story begins, Pop Miller and his grandson are traveling about the country as Pop makes his living with the rodeo. The problem is that Pop isn't a young man and soon his prize horse, Briar, is badly injured and it appears as if he'll need to be put to sleep. Fortunately, Pop meets up with a friendly preacher, Reverend Owens (Russell Hayden) and he helps them treat Briar and, hopefully, get him back into shape and on his feet. The preacher offers to let the Pop and his grandson stay with him during Briar's convalescence. There's quite a bit more to the story than this...probably best you see it yourself.

While I must admit that this film is pretty schmaltzy, it's also pretty good family entertainment...provided you can get past all the saccharine. Overall, pretty well done and worth seeing....but a bit heavy-handed and cliched to make it a must-see picture.


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