6.7/10
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21 user 30 critic

The Private Affairs of Bel Ami (1947)

Approved | | Drama | 25 April 1947 (USA)
Writer Georges Duroy (George Sanders) is one social-climbing S.O.B. who does most of his climbing over the warm (and cold) bodies of women. He begins with Rachel (Marie Wilson), a hanger-on... See full summary »

Director:

Albert Lewin

Writer:

Albert Lewin (screenplay)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
George Sanders ... Georges Duroy
Angela Lansbury ... Clotilde de Marelle
Ann Dvorak ... Claire Madeleine Forestier
John Carradine ... Charles Forestier
Susan Douglas Rubes ... Suzanne Walter (as Susan Douglas)
Hugo Haas ... Monsieur Walter
Warren William ... Laroche-Mathieu
Frances Dee ... Marie de Varenne
Albert Bassermann ... Jacques Rival
Marie Wilson ... Rachel Michot
Katherine Emery ... Madame Walter
Richard Fraser ... Philippe de Cantel
John Good John Good ... Paul de Cazolles
David Bond ... Norbert de Varenne
Leonard Mudie ... Potin
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Storyline

Writer Georges Duroy (George Sanders) is one social-climbing S.O.B. who does most of his climbing over the warm (and cold) bodies of women. He begins with Rachel (Marie Wilson), a hanger-on in the cafés and Folies Bergere crowd, and then moves on to dally with Clotilde de Morelle (Dame Angela Lansbury). Always striving to move upward on the social scale, he ditches her to marry Madeleine Forestier (Ann Dvorak). Now he gets on the fast track. He persuades Madame Walter (Katherine Emery), the wife of his publisher, to fall in love with him, and then compromises Madeleine to frame a divorce, so he can pursue Madame Walter's daughter, Suzanne (Susan Douglas Rubes). He moves along so well that ere long he is in legal position to usurp the title of one of France's most noble houses. The moral, at the end, is it is okay to mess with French women, but triffling with French titles is going too far. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

WOMEN GROVELED AT HIS FEET... and whimpered when he paused to give them a smile!

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The producers held a contest for artists to create a painting about the temptation of Saint Anthony for use in this movie. The artists were paid five hundred dollars each and got to keep their paintings after the pictures toured the U.S. and Britain during 1946 and 1947. Although Max Ernst won the contest (receiving an extra two thousand five hundred dollars) and got his painting on-screen, Salvador Dalí's contribution (featuring a parade of spider-legged elephants tormenting the saint) became better known. The other artists who submitted paintings are Leonora Carrington, Ivan Le Lorraine Albright, Stanley Spencer, Eugene Berman, Paul Delvaux, Louis Guglielmi, Horace Pippin, and Abraham Rattner. Artist Leonor Fini was also invited to contribute, but she never produced a painting. See more »

Goofs

At 9', a piano player and a violin player are doing a number. We hear a vibrato on the violin, but the left fingers of the player are not moving at all. See more »

Quotes

Georges Duroy: [dying] I have been scratched by an old cat.
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Crazy Credits

Opening credits: "This is the history of a scoundrel. The time is 1880 and the place is Paris." See more »

Connections

Version of For Men Only (1976) See more »

Soundtracks

Over the Waves
(uncredited)
Written by Juventino Rosas
Arranged by Darius Milhaud
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User Reviews

 
De Maupassant and the Code
19 June 2013 | by howardeismanSee all my reviews

The movie is is faithful to the novel for about 3/4 of its running time. A handsome, amoral rake cuts his way through the vain, naive, foppish,self centered denizens of Parisian society in the 1880s He is not that smart, but he is shrewd enough to get the money and affection he craves. We don't know where his appetites came from. De Maupassant created him primarily to show the appalling psychological weaknesses of French upper class society "Prety Boy", as he is called, wins and wins big.

Well, the morals code of 1947 would not permit this. A scoundrel thriving is as bad was a naked woman on screen in the 1940s. You couldn't show it! Thus, the entire last section of this movie is made to comply with the code, and it plays out a story of how "Pretty Boy"'s primary victim thwarts his schemes and gets even. She gets even Big.

While I am happy to see the rat get his, this ending undermines the main point of the novel. It also doesn't fit the first three quarters. Characters suddenly behave differently than they did previously with no description of how and why they changed.

Still, it is a literate and intelligent movie. Not many of this kind of movie was made then, and even fewer are made today It is well played. George Sanders is the perfect cad. All the female actors do very well. Even since I first saw Ann Dvorak when I was six or seven, I have had a crush on her all these many decades, so it was good to see her.

Well worth the time for intelligent viewers...and those seniors who love Ann Dvorak!!


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

25 April 1947 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Women of Paris See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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