Out of the Past (1947) - News Poster

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Five Classic Neo-Noirs You Can Watch Right Now on FilmStruck

Five Classic Neo-Noirs You Can Watch Right Now on FilmStruck
In his 1972 essay “Notes on Film Noir”, film critic-turned-screenwriter/director Paul Schrader wrote on how the genre was “not defined…by conventions of setting and conflict, but rather by the more subtle qualities of tone and mood.” It’s a mood best described as ‘you’re screwed, pal.’

Cynicism has always been at the heart of film noir, a genre full of desperate characters clinging to the shadows of world that’s forgotten them. It’s a cynicism born out of post-War disillusionment and anxiety that spawned the genre’s heyday from the early-40s all the way through the mid-1950s when suddenly “Dragnet” and “Leave it To Beaver” were reaffirming America’s squeaky-clean Eisenhower-era view of itself.

But with the post-Watergate 70s and Cold War 80s came a new slew of anxieties as the genre evolved, this time with less Hollywood restrictions. That meant more sex, more violence,
See full article at Indiewire »

Exclusive Interview – Karl Urban on the Dredd TV series, shaving his head for Thor Ragnarok and his new film Bent

Rafael Motamayor chats with Karl Urban on playing in some of the biggest film franchises, what he kept from the set of Lord of the Rings and more…

You have been in some of the biggest franchises in the world, yet you haven’t been typecast. How do you manage that? How do you choose your projects?

It all comes down to the script, to finding the story and character compelling. For me it doesn’t matter if it’s a small indie or a huge blockbuster, it comes down to the character. Then of course I also look at who’s involved and where it is shooting. For example, when I played Skurge in Thor: Ragnarok I was first interested in the arc that character goes through, he starts in one place and ends up somewhere completely different. There was a significant change in the character, which you don
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Errol Morris on Wormwood: 'There’s no guarantee you’ll find the truth. Sometimes you’re just lucky'

The documentary film-maker discusses his Netflix series that takes in the CIA and conspiracy theories, and – he thinks – still has something to say about the era of ‘fake news’

There’s a quote that I have always liked in Jacques Tourneur’s film noir Out of the Past: “All I can see is the frame. I’m going in there now to look at the picture.” What does that mean to a detective? You know there’s something wrong with a story but you can’t put your finger on what it is. Things don’t quite add up. Part of the effort in my recent Netflix project Wormwood was to construct a picture from various narrative fragments and pieces of evidence. But it’s even more complicated than that. You have various narratives, but part of the narrative is a desire to efface that narrative – to obscure it,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Raw Deal (1948)

Style can be the star in Classic Noir, making a less prestigious film more entertaining than one with bigger names. Dennis O’Keefe, Claire Trevor and Marsha Hunt spin an excellent crime-love-murder triangle, for a road picture that’s one of the best Noirs not made by a big studio. Director Anthony Mann and cinematographer John Alton dial up the intensity for an experience as rich as the best pulp crime fiction.

Raw Deal

Blu-ray

ClassicFlix

1948 / B&W / 1:37 Academy / 79 min. / Special Edition / Street Date January 16, 2018 / 39.99

Starring: Dennis O’Keefe, Claire Trevor, Marsha Hunt, John Ireland, Raymond Burr, Curt Conway, Chili Williams, Regis Toomey, Whit Bissell, Cliff Clark, Greg Barton, Tom Fadden, Ilka Grüning, Ray Teal.

Cinematography: John Alton

Film Editor: Alfred DeGaetano

Original Music: Paul Sawtell

Written by Leopold Atlas, John C. Higgens, from a story by Arnold B. Armstrong & Audrey Ashley

Produced by Edward Small

Directed by Anthony Mann
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Crypt of Curiosities: The Cat People Films

  • DailyDead
Next to Universal, few studios have had such a big impact on horror than Rko Radio Pictures. Started in 1927, Rko was the first studio founded to make exclusively sound films, a then-brand-new invention that served as a major draw for the studio. Rko’s life was relatively short (it was killed just 30 years after forming), but during their time, they put out a seriously impressive number of classics, including Top Hat, It’s a Wonderful Life, The Informer, and most notably, Citizen Kane.

Of course, Rko didn’t shy away from horror. While their output wasn’t nearly as prolific as, say, Universal’s, it was still quite impressive, boasting some of the most formative and important horror films of old Hollywood. Rko saw the release of a few all-time classics, including I Walked With a Zombie, The Thing From Another World, King Kong, and the topic of today’s Crypt,
See full article at DailyDead »

Neo Noir Pays Homage to Welles' Crime Drama and Other Classics of the '40s and '50s

Neo Noir Pays Homage to Welles' Crime Drama and Other Classics of the '40s and '50s
Trouble Is My Business with Brittney Powell. Co-written by actor/voice actor Tom Konkle, who also directed, and Xena: Warrior Princess actress Brittney Powell, Trouble Is My Business is a humorous homage to film noirs of the 1940s and 1950s, among them John Huston's The Maltese Falcon and Orson Welles' Touch of Evil. Konkle stars in the sort of role that back in the '40s and '50s belonged to the likes of Humphrey Bogart, Robert Mitchum, Dick Powell, and Alan Ladd. As the femme fatale, Brittney Powell is supposed to evoke memories of Jane Greer, Lizabeth Scott, Lauren Bacall, and Claire Trevor. 'Trouble Is My Business': Humorous film noir homage evokes memories of 'The Maltese Falcon' & 'Touch of Evil' A crunchy, witty, and often just plain funny mash-up of classic noir tropes, from hard-boiled private dicks to the easy-on-the-eyes femme fatales – in addition to dialogue worthy of Dashiell Hammett and, occasionally
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Curious Languor of Robert Mitchum

  • MUBI
Everyone notices the eyes first, languid, those of a somnambulist. Robert Mitchum, calm and observant, is a presence that, through passivity, enamors a viewer. His face is as effulgent as moonlight. The man smolders, with that boozy, baritone voice, seductive and soporific, a cigarette perched between wispy lips below which is a chin cleft like a geological fault. He’s slithery with innuendo. There’s an effortless allure to it all, a mix of malaise and braggadocio, a cocksure machismo and a hint of fragility. He’s ever-cool, a paradox, “radiating heat without warmth,” as Richard Brody said. A poet, a prodigious lover and drinker, a bad boy; his penchant for marijuana landed him in jail, and in the photographs from his two-month stay he looks like a natural fit. He sits, wrapped in denim, legs spread wide, hair shiny and slick, holding a cup of coffee. His mouth is
See full article at MUBI »

Errol Morris on ‘Alternative Facts,’ CIA Coverups and His New Netflix Series ‘Wormwood’

Errol Morris on ‘Alternative Facts,’ CIA Coverups and His New Netflix Series ‘Wormwood’
Errol Morris, the Oscar-winning director of “The Thin Blue Line” and “The Fog of War,” is back with the most formally daring project of his career, “Wormwood.”

The six-part Netflix miniseries defies easy categorization. It is equal parts documentary and narrative drama — a dazzlingly original dive into the mysterious death of Frank Olson, a CIA employee who plunged out of a New York City hotel window in 1953 after unwittingly being dosed with LSD. The binge-able series follows Olson’s son, Eric, as he tries to piece together what happened to his father, interspersing interviews with dramatic scenes acted out by the likes of Peter Sarsgaard and Molly Parker. It makes a compelling case that the spy agency, which later apologized for drugging Olson, also had him murdered and spent decades covering up its crime.

Wormwood” debuted Friday at the Telluride Film Festival. Before touching down in Colorado, Morris spoke with Variety about his passion for truth-finding, the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Catching Up with Olivier Assayas

  • MUBI
Olivier Assayas. Photo by Locarno Festival / Massimo PedrazziniAt this year’s edition of the Locarno Festival, French filmmaker Olivier Assayas was the head of the main competition jury. As the festival drew to a close, we caught up with Assayas in the lobby of his hotel for an informal chat about viewing habits, mobile phones in cinema, and his upcoming project Ebook.Notebook: Have you seen any of the Jacques Tourneur movies from the festival's retrospective? Olivier Assayas: I’ve seen Out of the Past (1947) and Berlin Express (1948). Out of the Past I saw ages ago and Berlin Express I thought I had seen but no, this was the first time.Notebook: Do you like him?Assayas: I love Tourneur. I think he’s a genius—a great filmmaker. Well, I don’t know about a genius. Certainly a great filmmaker [laughs]. Notebook: I really like Berlin Express. It’s
See full article at MUBI »

The Best Classic Movies for People Who Don’t Watch Older Films — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best Classic Movies for People Who Don’t Watch Older Films — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

A recent article (based on a very unscientific poll) argued that millennials don’t really care about old movies. Maybe that’s true, and maybe it isn’t, but the fact remains that many people disregard classic cinema on principle. These people are missing out, but it only takes one film — the right film — to change their minds and forever alter their viewing habits.

This week’s question: What is one classic film you would recommend to someone who doesn’t watch them?

Candice Frederick (@ReelTalker), Hello Beautiful, /Film, Thrillist, etc

Rebel Without a Cause.” I’ll out myself by saying that I’ve only recently seen this film
See full article at Indiewire »

Rushes. Jerry Lewis, Locarno Festival, Serge Daney in English, "Nocturama" Debate

  • MUBI
Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSWe are devastated by the death of performer and director Jerry Lewis this week at the age of 91, one of the 20th century's greatest—and most inspiring—artists. Dave Kehr for The New York Times has penned an excellent obituary, and it's worth revisiting Christoph Huber's 2013 coverage of the Viennale's epic retrospective of Lewis's work as an actor and a filmmaker. Last year, Adrian Curry published a selection of the international poster designs for Lewis's films.The Locarno Festival wrapped last week, with the top prize going to Chinese documentarian Wang Bing's Mrs. Fang. We were at the festival covering it day by day, including its retrospective of Hollywood genre director Jacques Tourneur (Cat People, Out of the Past). See all the awards and read our coverage from the Swiss film festival.Recommended VIEWINGThe
See full article at MUBI »

Great Job, Internet!: Let’s remember San Francisco’s glorious history as the home of film noir

In the peak American film noir years from 1940 to 1960, an astonishing number of these movies took place in the scenic west coast city of San Francisco. Fandor’s new video, “Shadows In The Fog: Classic San Francisco Film Noir” points out that as many as 70 of these films were set in the city by the bay, including classics like John Huston’s version of the The Maltese Falcon, which kicked off the genre in 1941. Orson Welles followed in 1947 with The Lady From Shanghai, which featured scenes in the city’s famous aquarium and a suspenseful footrace through Chinatown.

That same year saw Humphrey Bogart’s return to San Fran to hide out after an escape from San Quentin in Dark Passage, highlighted by director Delmer Daves’ native knowledge of the city, as well as Robert Mitchum’s noir classic Out Of The Past. All of ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Cult Horror, Film Noir, and Sci-Fi Movies Tonight on TCM: Ulmer Remembered

Edgar G. Ulmer movies on TCM: 'The Black Cat' & 'Detour' Turner Classic Movies' June 2017 Star of the Month is Audrey Hepburn, but Edgar G. Ulmer is its film personality of the evening on June 6. TCM will be presenting seven Ulmer movies from the mid-1930s to the mid-1960s, including his two best-known efforts: The Black Cat (1934) and Detour (1945). The Black Cat was released shortly before the officialization of the Christian-inspired Production Code, which would castrate American filmmaking – with a few clever exceptions – for the next quarter of a century. Hence, audiences in spring 1934 were able to witness satanism in action, in addition to other bizarre happenings in an art deco mansion located in an isolated area of Hungary. Sporting a David Bowie hairdo, Boris Karloff is at his sinister best in The Black Cat (“Do you hear that, Vitus? The phone is dead. Even the phone is dead”), ailurophobic (a.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Night of the Demon (Rendez-vous avec la peur)

Night of the Demon (Rendez-vous avec la peur)
This French disc release of the Jacques Tourneur classic gets everything right — including both versions in picture perfect transfers. Devil debunker Dana Andrews locks horns with Niall MacGinnis, a necromancer “who has decoded the Old Book” and can summon a fire & brimstone monster from Hell, no election fraud necessary. Even fans that hate ghost stories love this one — it’s a truly creepy, intelligent highlight of the horror genre.

Night of the Demon

Region A + B Blu-ray + Pal DVD

Wild Side (Fr)

1957 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 95 & 82 min. / Street Date November 27, 2013 / Curse of the Demon, Rendez-vous avec la peur / Available from Amazon UK or Foreign Exchange Blu-ray

Starring: Dana Andrews, Peggy Cummins, Niall MacGinnis, Maurice Denham,

Athene Seyler

Cinematography: Ted Scaife

Production Designer: Ken Adam

Special Effects: George Blackwell, S.D. Onions, Wally Veevers

Film Editor Michael Gordon

Original Music: Clifton Parker

Written by Charles Bennett and Hal E. Chester

from the
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Scar

Director Steve Sekely’s hardboiled film noir leans heavily on the talents of star-producer Paul Henreid and camera ace John Alton — the three of them whip up the best gimmick-driven noir thriller of the late ‘forties. Strained coincidences and unlikely events mean nothing when this much talent is concentrated in one movie. It’s also a terrific show for star Joan Bennett, who expresses all the disappointment, despair and angst of a noir femme who knows she’s in for more misery.

The Scar (Hollow Triumph)

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1948 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 83 min. / Street Date April 18, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Paul Henreid, Joan Bennett, Eduard Franz, Leslie Brooks, John Qualen, Mabel Paige, Herbert Rudley, George Chandler, Robert Bice, Henry Brandon, Franklyn Farnum, Thomas Browne Henry, Norma Varden, Jack Webb.

Cinematography: John Alton

Film Editor: Fred Allen

Original Music: Sol Kaplan

Written by Daniel Fuchs from a
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Kino Lorber to Release The Spiral Staircase (1946) on Blu-ray & DVD

  • DailyDead
A breathtaking mansion becomes the backdrop of grisly murders in The Spiral Staircase, a 1946 thriller co-starring Ethel Barrymore and coming to Blu-ray and DVD courtesy of Kino Lorber.

A release date, cover art, and special features for The Sprial Staircase Blu-ray and DVD have not yet been revealed, but we'll keep Daily Dead readers updated on this release. In the meantime, you can check out the official announcement from Kino Lorber below, as well as the film's trailer.

From Kino Lorber: "Coming Soon on DVD and Blu-ray!

Oscar Nominee: Best Supporting Actress (Barrymore)

The Spiral Staircase (1946) Starring Dorothy McGuire, George Brent, Ethel Barrymore, Kent Smith, Rhonda Fleming, Elsa Lachester and Sara Allgood - Based on a Novel by Ethel Lina White (The Lady Vanishes) - Shot by Nicholas Musuraca (Out of the Past, Cat People) - Directed by Robert Siodmak (Criss Cross, Cry of the City)"

Synopsis (via Blu-ray.
See full article at DailyDead »

Kirk Douglas Turns 100! A Look Back at the Star's Most Iconic Performances

Kirk Douglas, one of Hollywood's most celebrated icons, turns 100 on Friday, marking a milestone in a life filled with some of the best roles a star could hope for and some of the best performances anyone has ever given.

With three Oscar nominations and an honorary Lifetime Achievement Oscar under his belt, Et is taking a look back at some of Douglas' greatest films in honor of his special day.

Photos: 12 Actors' Kids Who Went On To Become Stars

1. Champion (1949)

United Artists

In one of his first leading roles, Douglas starred as a boxer named Midge Kelly, whose rise to fame and stardom in the ring brings out his vain, cruel side in his private life. The black and white noir drama earned Douglas his first of three Oscar nominations.

2. Ace in the Hole (1951)

Paramount Pictures

In this brooding, cynical noir thriller, directed by Billy Wilder, Douglas plays Chuck Tatum, a disgraced
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Recommended New Books on Filmmaking: A Holiday Gift Guide for the Discerning Cinephile

It’s the most wonderful time of the year for film fans, with some of the best films of the year in theaters and lots of elaborate and thoroughly-researched books to read. This rundown has real variety, with new and recent texts covering cinema history, TV greats, and, of course, Star Wars. Note that one of this year’s finest books, The Oliver Stone Experience (Abrams Books), was covered by The Film Stage in September via an interview with author Matt Zoller Seitz. Make sure to check out Experience, and see below for another fine selection from the prolific Seitz.

Star Wars Year by Year: A Visual History, Updated Edition by Daniel Wallace (Dk Publishing)

It’s a fantastic idea: a book that offers a timeline not of the Star Wars story, but of the Star Wars phenomenon. This newly updated edition of the 2010 release now includes recent works like
See full article at The Film Stage »

Blu-ray Deal of the Week: 3 Warner Archive Blu-rays for $35

There are many great sales online this week, but the folks at Amazon are treating us to something special: 3 Warner Archive Blu-rays for $35.

While this might not be the lowest that we’ve seen prices on these Blu-rays (the WB Shop has had 5 for $50 sales in the past that have included Warner Archive Blu-rays), it is certainly a good deal on great films.

It looks as though many of these discs are selling quickly, and the time out from when they’ll ship for some of the more popular titles is growing. Below you’ll find a list of the titles which are included in this promotion.

As always, these are affiliate links and will help support this site, should you choose to make any purchases through them.

42nd Street A Mighty Wind Beware The Batman: Dark Justice Season 1 Part 2 Big Sleep Body Snatchers Cat On A Hot Tin Roof
See full article at CriterionCast »

Discover the Twisty World of French Noir in Video Montage

It’s unlikely that you want another person who’ll describe the virtues of Out of the Past, Double Indemnity, Touch of Evil, The Maltese Falcon, Laura, The Third Man, The Naked City — which, while great, are the film noir to which we’re most accustomed. And the most rudimentary French-language knowledge will key us in to the fact that those wholly American (or wholly America-seeming) pictures find root in a cinematic tradition we don’t often turn to for dark, twisty stories of intrigue and deceit.

Let’s expand our noir knowledge, then, with a new video essay by Cristina Álvarez López and Adrian Martin that, until the end, elides direct name-checking and instead favors palettes that don’t feel so foreign after all. In an article written for BFI, who are hosting a French noir festival this month, the team explain that these works nevertheless stand apart from
See full article at The Film Stage »
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