6.8/10
3,118
65 user 24 critic

My Favorite Brunette (1947)

Passed | | Comedy, Crime, Mystery | 4 April 1947 (USA)
Shortly before his execution on the death row in San Quentin, amateur sleuth and baby photographer Ronnie Jackson, tells reporters how he got there.

Director:

Elliott Nugent

Writers:

Edmund Beloin (original screenplay), Jack Rose (original screenplay)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Bob Hope ... Ronnie Jackson
Dorothy Lamour ... Carlotta Montay
Peter Lorre ... Kismet
Lon Chaney Jr. ... Willie (as Lon Chaney)
John Hoyt ... Dr. Lundau
Charles Dingle ... Major Simon Montague
Reginald Denny ... James Collins
Frank Puglia ... Baron Montay
Ann Doran ... Miss Rogers
Willard Robertson ... Prison Warden
Jack La Rue ... Tony
Charles Arnt ... Crawford
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Storyline

Baby photographer Ronnie Jackson, on death row in San Quentin, tells reporters how he got there: taking care of his private-eye neighbor's office, Ronnie is asked by the irresistible Baroness Montay to find the missing Baron. There follow confusing but sinister doings in a gloomy mansion and a private sanatorium, with every plot twist a parody of thriller cliches. What are the villains really after? Can Ronnie beat a framed murder rap? Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

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Taglines:

LOOK WHO'S SOLVING MURDERS! (print ad - Lubbock Evening Journal - Lindsey Theatre - Lubbock, Texas - June 24, 1947 - all caps) See more »


Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The failure of the original copyright holder to renew the film's copyright resulted in it falling into public domain, meaning that virtually anyone could duplicate and sell a VHS/DVD copy of the film. Therefore, many of the versions of this film available on the market are either severely (and usually badly) edited and/or of extremely poor quality, having been duped from second- or third-generation (or more) copies of the film. See more »

Goofs

As Ronnie and Carlotta attempt to escape from Seacliffe, and she wonders if the villains have taken his car keys (before they creep down the staircase), a long pole (to the left of frame) hurriedly retreats out of shot. See more »

Quotes

Ronnie Jackson: [soon to be executed] Remember, I'm doing this without a rehearsal.
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Connections

Featured in American Masters: This Is Bob Hope... (2017) See more »

Soundtracks

My Favorite Brunette
(uncredited)
Music by Jay Livingston
Lyrics by Ray Evans
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User Reviews

 
Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour reunite in fast moving enjoyable comedy/thriller
15 December 2000 | by clive-38See all my reviews

The 1940's was a very prolific period for Bob Hope as he made 21 movies during that decade including some of his very best (the "Road" films of course with Crosby and Lamour, "The Paleface" with Jane Russell, and "My Favorite Blonde" with Madeleine Carroll). However, "Brunette" rates as high, if not higher, than any of these as it had a very funny script and a wonderful supporting cast including Peter Lorre, Lon Chaney Jnr, John Hoyt, Ann Doran, Reginald Denny, Ray Teal, Jack La Rue and a couple of surprise star cameos. Peter Lorre in particular seemed to enjoy sending up his usual image as a sinister killer.

San Francisco baby photographer Ronnie Jackson (Bob Hope) has unfulfilled ambitions to be a private detective like his neighbour in the next office Sam McCloud. When Sam goes out of town Carlotta Montay (Dorothy Lamour) comes in seeking help and mistakes Hope for the detective who thinks this could be the big chance to prove himself but as usual in a Hope film he runs into more trouble than he can handle. Lamour persuades Hope to look for her uncle who has been kidnapped by the villains and a double put in his place. The plot thickens as he accompanies Lamour into many ludicrous situations, unforeseen danger and one hilarious episode after another.

Some favourite lines from the film:

Bob Hope: "You see, I wanted to be a detective too. It only took brains, courage and a gun - and I had the gun!".

Bob Hope: "I was cut out for this kind of life. All my life I've wanted to be a hard boiled detective like Humphrey Bogart, or Dick Powell ... or even Alan Ladd!".

Bob Hope (to Peter Lorre): "Nice cheerful place - what time do they bring the mummies out?".

Bob Hope: "It always looked so easy in those Tarzan pictures!".

Bob Hope (to Dorothy Lamour): "I don't know how much more of this I can take - you've had me in hot water so long I feel like a tea bag".

Bob Hope could always be relied upon to bring us the laughs with even the most average script but in this film he excels as he is given some great material to work with and certainly makes the most of it. 10/10. Clive Roberts.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

4 April 1947 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Private Eye See more »

Filming Locations:

Pebble Beach, California, USA See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Hope Enterprises See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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