6.6/10
4,922
106 user 45 critic

Lady in the Lake (1946)

Approved | | Crime, Film-Noir, Mystery | 24 January 1947 (USA)
Trailer
3:29 | Trailer
The lady editor of a crime magazine hires Philip Marlowe to find the wife of her boss. The private detective soon finds himself involved in murder.

Director:

Robert Montgomery

Writers:

Steve Fisher (screenplay), Raymond Chandler (novel)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Robert Montgomery ... Phillip Marlowe
Audrey Totter ... Adrienne Fromsett
Lloyd Nolan ... Lt. DeGarmot
Tom Tully ... Capt. Kane
Leon Ames ... Derace Kingsby
Jayne Meadows ... Mildred Havelend
Dick Simmons ... Chris Lavery
Morris Ankrum ... Eugene Grayson
Lila Leeds ... Receptionist
William Roberts ... Artist
Kathleen Lockhart ... Mrs. Grayson
Ellay Mort Ellay Mort ... Chrystal Kingsby
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Storyline

The camera shows Phillip Marlowe's view from the first-person in this adaptation of Raymond Chandler's book. The detective is hired to find a publisher's wife, who is supposed to have run off to Mexico. But the case soon becomes much more complicated as people are murdered. Written by Ken Yousten <kyousten@bev.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

M*G*M presents a Revolutionary motion picture; the most amazing since Talkies began! YOU and ROBERT MONTGOMERY solve a murder mystery together! See more »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This film was completed in mid-1946 and trade shown in Los Angeles, and reviewed in Weekly Variety in November 1946, so, in this sense, it's a 1946 production. Since it was not released theatrically until January 1947, IMDb and AFI use that date after the title, in order to comply with their own book of rules. Rumored to have been intended as a December 1946 release, which would have coincided with the Christmas themed story background, MGM executives backed down at the last minute and delayed its release until January 1947 so as not to "offend" holiday season moviegoers, a high percentage of which included the so-called "family trade." For the same reason, they tacked on the "happy ending" sequence, over the strenuous objections of both Montgomery and Totter. See more »

Goofs

In the scene where Adrienne is taking care of Marlowe after the car crash, she hands him a mirror so he can see his injuries. As he is putting the mirror down, you can clearly see the face of a stage hand in the mirror. See more »

Quotes

Derris Kingsby: You want the facts, don't you?
Philip Marlowe: When it comes to women, does anybody really want the facts?
See more »

Crazy Credits

SPOILER! In the opening credits Crystal Kingsby is written as being played by Ellay Mort, the phonetic spelling for 'elle est morte', French for 'she is dead' See more »

Connections

Referenced in Trancers (1984) See more »

Soundtracks

The First Noel
(uncredited)
Traditional Christmas song
Played during the opening credits
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User Reviews

Film noir with a unique twist
2 April 2004 | by steve-raybouldSee all my reviews

Out of the many Marlowe novel adaptations, this must be one of the closest to the spirit of the original. Unfortunately Chandler himself does not seem to have had the opportunity to contribute to the screenplay - although there are plenty of Chandleresque wisecracks. The film, unlike most of the other adaptions reflects the original author's full dislike of the cops (although the tough police chief having to answer a telephone call from his daughter during an interrogation is an unusual appeal for the viewer's understanding), and mistrust bordering on pathological hatred of women (I suspect that the ending is an uncharacteristic 'cop out' to assuage the producer's or popular taste). Director/star Robert Montgomery shows great self-restraint by appearing only briefly in the action. When he does show himself, mainly in mirror-reflections, the star appears (as in that other great latter day film noir, China Town) battered and bruised and not at all flattering. The plot is suitably twisted and confusing - just like the novels. And the concept of timing the whole dark affair against the backdrop of the Christmas holidays only emphasises the bleakness of the subject matter. Incidentally the idea of continuing the opening titles' jolly Christmas carol chorus in darker, more disturbing tones throughout the soundtrack is fascinating and I think unique. Audrey Totter (whatever happened to her?) makes a very sexy femme fatale. And as she plays most of her lines to camera we are seduced just as protagonist Marlowe. On top of that, her gowns are absolutely magnificent examples of forties chic. Lloyd Nolan deserves special mention as a superb heavy. What a wonderful example of Hollywood film noir.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

24 January 1947 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Lady in the Lake See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,026,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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