6.0/10
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8 user 3 critic

Her Husband's Affairs (1947)

Passed | | Comedy, Sci-Fi | 12 November 1947 (USA)
A scientist invents a formula that removes old, thinning hair and replaces it with thick, new hair. Complications ensue.

Director:

S. Sylvan Simon

Writers:

Ben Hecht (original screenplay), Charles Lederer (original screenplay)
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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview:
Lucille Ball ... Margaret Weldon
Franchot Tone ... William Weldon
Edward Everett Horton ... J.B. Cruikshank
Mikhail Rasumny ... Prof. Emil Glinka
Gene Lockhart ... Peter Winterbottom
Nana Bryant ... Mrs. Winterbottom
Jonathan Hale ... Gov. Fox
Paul Stanton ... Dr. Frazee
Mabel Paige ... Mrs. Josper
Frank Mayo ... Vice President Starrett
Pierre Watkin ... Vice President Beitler
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Storyline

Ad man/genius William Weldon resents his wife Margaret's meddling in his business, even though her suggestions are often on target. The situation gets put to its toughest test when Weldon tries to market an eccentric inventor's embalming fluid, which turns out to be a hair remover. Written by Daniel Bubbeo <dbubbeo@aol.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

NUNCA HUBC UN QUILIOTE DIVERFTTIDO...NT OTRA DULLINNA TAN ATREVIDA! (original Spanish poster-all caps) See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Sci-Fi

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

"Screen Director's Playhouse" broadcast a 30-minute radio adaptation of the movie on May 22, 1949 with Lucille Ball reprising her film role. See more »

Goofs

When Bill falls down the luggage chute on the ship, he pulls down a post and the rope to which it was attached. However in the shot from the perspective of looking down the chute, the rope (and presumably the post - out of the shot) are still in place. See more »

Quotes

Margaret Weldon: [Crying in bed] I'm not going to be any use to you at all. I can see that.
William Weldon: Please, Margaret. You're just trying to pick a fight.
Margaret Weldon: No, I'm not. But you needed me when... when we were poor little nobodys. I meant something to you and I helped too even if you did holler. But now, now we're going to be lost in forest of butlers. Oh, Bill I'm scared.
William Weldon: Oh, don't talk crazy.
Margaret Weldon: Mrs. Winterbottom told me that... that they were happy when they had one room and a Murphy bed. Now they have separate bedrooms.
William Weldon: Tsk. ...
[...]
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Soundtracks

For He's a Jolly Good Fellow
(uncredited)
18th century French tune
Sung by participants at a convention
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User Reviews

 
Lucy tries to help her husband get ahead---and it ain't Ricky Ricardo!
9 July 2003 | by mark.waltzSee all my reviews

Four years before "I Love Lucy", Lucille Ball had not yet found her niche as a movie star. Films had mostly typecast her as a hard boiled dame, and while she was called "Queen of the B's", she was not yet a household name. In this film, her first chance to show her talent as a comedienne, Lucy plays the wife of advertising exec Franchot Tone (real-life ex-husband of Joan Crawford). Lucy inspires her husband at every turn, eventually getting him attention as the man who advertised the most comfortable hat in the world. (So comfortable, in fact, a mayor was booed for wearing a hat during the Star Spangled Banner at a ballgame when he had no idea he was wearing one...) A wacky scientist convinces him to advertise a shaving and hair tonic which ends up causing more than its share of chaos.

While Lucy had done comedy before on-screen ("Go Chase Yourself" and "A Girl, A Guy, and a Gob" were typical RKO comedys of the late 30's and early 40's), she never had a chance to really be anything more than a hard-boiled wisecracker. These movies make her less likable than the equally wisecracking Eve Arden and did not portray her in a positive or feminine light. When both Eve and Lucy went onto do radio shows, their future as the first queens of primetime TV comedy were set in stone. (Check out Lucy and Eve in the drama with wisecracks, "Stage Door", and the entertaining comedy "Having Wonderful Time", both starring the more glamorous wisecracker, Ginger Rogers).

"Her Husband's Affairs" is a fast moving, but formula comedy, filled with some hysterical comic bits, but not as well done as her best pre-TV comedy, "The Fuller Brush Girl". Both films involve comic sequences involving hair. While "The Fuller Brush Girl" is hysterical throughout, there are only fleeting moments of hysterical laughter in this film (most memorably the scene where the defects of the shaving lotion is revealed). This film was made during her declining days at MGM at the then not yet major Columbia studios where Jean Arthur reigned as comedy queen and probably turned this film down before departing a few years before it was released. Shabbily treated by L.B. Mayer after some colorful "A" musicals, Lucy ended up on the bottom of the bill in secondary features such as this. The film features such great character actors as Grant Mitchell and Edward Everett Horton (here quite bald). Featured in a cameo is Columbia's biggest star Larry Parks as himself. "Her Husband's Wife" is sure to entertain as an example of what Lucy was really good at. If only the script was a little better.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

12 November 1947 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Fuld af skæg See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Cornell Pictures See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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