A reporter pretends to be Jewish in order to cover a story on anti-Semitism, and personally discovers the true depths of bigotry and hatred.

Director:

Elia Kazan

Writers:

Laura Z. Hobson (novel), Moss Hart (screen play)
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Won 3 Oscars. Another 9 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Gregory Peck ... Philip Schuyler Green
Dorothy McGuire ... Kathy Lacy
John Garfield ... Dave Goldman
Celeste Holm ... Anne Dettrey
Anne Revere ... Mrs. Green
June Havoc ... Elaine Wales
Albert Dekker ... John Minify
Jane Wyatt ... Jane
Dean Stockwell ... Tommy Green
Nicholas Joy ... Dr. Craigie
Sam Jaffe ... Prof. Fred Lieberman
Harold Vermilyea ... Lou Jordan
Ransom M. Sherman Ransom M. Sherman ... Bill Payson
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Storyline

Philip Green is a highly respected writer who is recruited by a national magazine to write a series of articles on anti-Semitism in America. He's not too keen on the series, mostly because he's not sure how to tackle the subject. Then it dawns on him: if he was to pretend to all and sundry that he was Jewish, he could then experience the degree of racism and prejudice that exists and write his story from that perspective. It takes little time for him to experience bigotry. His anger at the way he is treated also affects his relationship with Kathy Lacy, his publisher's niece and the person who suggested the series in the first place. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

"Lux Radio Theater" broadcast a 60-minute radio adaptation of the movie on March 15, 1954, with Dorothy McGuire reprising her film role. See more »

Goofs

When Phil is taking Tommy to meet his (Phil's) mother at Saks Fifth Avenue, they stop in front of the statue of Atlas outside Rockefeller Center. In the shot of the two of them talking, with Fifth Avenue in the background, Saks is directly behind them, diagonally across the street on the right, with St. Patrick's Cathedral on the left. But when Phil looks at his watch and tells Tommy they'd better leave to meet grandma, the two hurry off back north along Fifth Avenue - in the completely opposite direction of the plainly visible Saks. See more »

Quotes

Anne Dettrey: They scold Bilbo and think they've fought the good fight for democracy in this country. They haven't got the guts to go from talking to action. One little action on one little front. Sure, I know its not the whole answer, but its got to start somewhere, and it's got to start with passion. Not pamphlets, not even your series. It's got to be with people. Rich people, poor people, big and little people. And it's got to be quick.
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Crazy Credits

The main title theme begins with the Fox logo, replacing the usual Alfred Newman fanfare. See more »

Connections

Featured in 20th Century-Fox: The First 50 Years (1997) See more »

Soundtracks

Street Scene
Composed by Alfred Newman
Played during opening scene
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User Reviews

 
Groundbreaking
22 June 2006 | by IncalculacableSee all my reviews

I hate to say it, but before I saw this movie, I did not realize that there was racism against Jews in the post war period. I couldn't understand it: why would Americans promote the very thing they fought against in the war? Then I was informed that they weren't fighting against racism or discrimination, but against the Nazi regime and genocide. There is a large difference between one person's opinion and a government policy. I'm a teenager, and the fact that Jews were still discriminated against was never mentioned to me. Maybe it should be better known. I am doing Modern History next year and we will be studying the Second World War, and I'm very glad I saw this film (despite its inaccuracies).

Anyway – now to the plot. Phillip Green (Gregory Peck) is a writer who pretends to be Jewish to find out about anti-Semitism. Through this, he learns how much people discriminate against Jews and it affects him deeply and changes his life.

I was never bored in this film. I am forever fascinated by Peck, who I've always remembered as Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird (1962). This is only the second film I've seen with Peck in his younger days (it's quite a pleasure watching him). Celeste Holm also is amazing and I love how she can laugh so easily – very realistic. The only thing I wasn't satisfied with is the romantic choices by Peck's character. I wish he would have chosen the happy blonde Anne instead of the sappy, boring Kathy. Oh, how I was hoping he would choose Anne! Perhaps Dorothy McGuire was miscast; maybe someone else could have brought more energy to her character. John Garfield is fantastic as Green's Jewish friend.

This was ground breaking at the time and I really respect the people who participated in this film for taking a risk. Despite being made almost 60 years ago, I have not only learned from it but enjoyed it. Yes, there are some inaccuracies and plot holes, but I don't particularly care and it doesn't distract me. It's a great film, go see it.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

March 1948 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Laura Z. Hobson's Gentleman's Agreement See more »

Filming Locations:

New York City, New York, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,985,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

Twentieth Century Fox See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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