The Yearling (1946) - News Poster

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Which lead actress is most in need of overdue Oscar attention? Saoirse Ronan, Scarlett Johansson or Alfre Woodard? [Poll]

  • Gold Derby
Which lead actress is most in need of overdue Oscar attention? Saoirse Ronan, Scarlett Johansson or Alfre Woodard? [Poll]
A quintet of leading ladies listed on Gold Derby’s combined odds list of Academy Award predictions all qualify as being overdue for a Oscar statuette. Most have been nominated before while one former vampire lover has never been in the running. Here, in order of their current placement among lead actress contenders on the site, are those who might go on to give a speech at the ceremony on Feb. 9, 2020.

1. Saoirse Ronan, “Little Women”: The Irish actress follows in the bookish Civil War-era footsteps of Katharine Hepburn, June Allyson and Winona Ryder — the actresses who most notably played Jo, the headstrong and ambitious March sister — in the 1933, 1949 and 1994 big-screen adaptations of Louisa May Alcott’s novel “Little Women.” Ryder was nominated for Lead Actress and Ronan just might do the same. She has been nominated for a supporting Oscar as a spiteful teen in 2007’s “Atonement” followed by
See full article at Gold Derby »

Gregory Peck movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘To Kill a Mockingbird,’ ‘Roman Holiday,’ ‘Moby Dick’

  • Gold Derby
Gregory Peck movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘To Kill a Mockingbird,’ ‘Roman Holiday,’ ‘Moby Dick’
Gregory Peck would’ve celebrated his 103rd birthday on April 5, 2019. The Oscar-winning actor starred in dozens of classics, staying active on the big and small screen until his death in 2003 at the age of 87. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 20 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1916, Peck made his screen debut with a starring role in “Days of Glory” (1944). He earned his first Oscar nomination as Best Actor for his second movie, “The Keys of the Kingdom” (1944), playing a Catholic priest spreading Christianity in China. He earned subsequent bids for playing an ex-Confederate soldier in “The Yearling” (1946), a journalist posing as Jewish in “Gentleman’s Agreement” (1947) and an Air Force commander in “Twelve O’Clock High” (1949).

SEEOscar Best Actor Gallery: Every Winner in Academy Award History

He clinched the gold for “To Kill a Mockingbird” (1962), adapted from Harper Lee‘s beloved Civil Rights novel.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Gregory Peck movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Gregory Peck movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best
Gregory Peck would’ve celebrated his 103rd birthday on April 5, 2019. The Oscar-winning actor starred in dozens of classics, staying active on the big and small screen until his death in 2003 at the age of 87. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 20 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1916, Peck made his screen debut with a starring role in “Days of Glory” (1944). He earned his first Oscar nomination as Best Actor for his second movie, “The Keys of the Kingdom” (1944), playing a Catholic priest spreading Christianity in China. He earned subsequent bids for playing an ex-Confederate soldier in “The Yearling” (1946), a journalist posing as Jewish in “Gentleman’s Agreement” (1947) and an Air Force commander in “Twelve O’Clock High” (1949).

He clinched the gold for “To Kill a Mockingbird” (1962), adapted from Harper Lee‘s beloved Civil Rights novel. The role of Atticus Finch, a
See full article at Gold Derby »

Strait-Jacket

Strait-Jacket

Blu ray

Shout Factory

1964 / 1.85:1 / Street Date August 21, 2018

Starring Joan Crawford, Diane Baker

Cinematography by Arthur Arling

Directed by William Castle

The planets aligned in 1964 as William Castle’s Strait-Jacket premiered in January and Susan Sontag’s Notes on Camp was published later that fall. There’s no mention of Castle’s axe-happy melodrama in Sontag’s essay – an eclectic rundown of kitsch touchstones extolling everything from The Mysterians to Steve Reeves – and that’s surprising because frame by frame, Castle’s overcooked fright-fest encompasses almost everything Sontag had to say about the joys of guilelessly bad art.

Joan Crawford stars as Lucy Harbin, a middle-aged outcast back home after a twenty year stint in a mental institution. The film’s prologue sets the stage; one hot night in 1944 Lucy paused by her bedroom window to find her husband sharing their bed with another, distinctly younger, woman. The enraged
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Ten Things I Learned At Tcmff 2018

Ten Things I Learned At Tcmff 2018

Yet another TCM Classic Film Festival is in the bank—the ninth out of nine I’ve been privileged to attend. For those who have a mind to, my extended coverage of the festival—not a blow-by-blow of everything I did, but a look at some of the highlights—is available at Slant magazine’s blog The House Next Door, the venue that has sponsored my Tcmff attendance for all of those nine years. As I have said many times, my classic movie education would be considerably less rich without the support of my editor at Slant, Ed Gonzalez, and I would be remiss if he ever had a moment in which the truth of this statement was not perfectly clear in his mind. And as if by way of proving my gain, every year, in addition to the Slant piece, I like to
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Nowhere in Africa

Caroline Link’s wonderful, woefully obscure Best Foreign Film winner is an entertaining story of the perils of wartime emigration. It hits hard right now, with our own immigration crackdown underway. A Jewish family smartly escapes Nazi Germany at the 11th hour, only to find themselves imprisoned in detention camps by the British — who ironically consider them dangerous enemy aliens. The show is a glorious growing-up tale for a German tot transplanted to Kenya, and becomes an edgy romantic story when the mother repurposes her amorous needs to help rescue her family.

Nowhere in Africa

Blu-ray

Kino Lorber / Zeitgeist

20019 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 141 min. / Nirgendwo in Afrika / Street Date February 27, 2018 / available through Kino Lorber / 34.95

Starring Merab Ninidze, Juliane Köhler, Lea Kurka, Karoline Eckertz, Sidede Onyulo, Matthias Habich, Herbert Knaup

Cinematography Gernot Roll

Production Designer Susann Bieling, Uwe Szielasko

Film Editor Patricia Rommel

Original Music Niki Reiser, Jochen Schmidt-Hambrock

Written by Caroline
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Scaramouche

There’s a heapin’-helpin’ of palace intrigue in this 1952 swashbuckler starring underrated action hero Stewart Granger (the role was a gift from MGM for his bang-up job in King Solomon’s Mines made two years earlier). Though it lacks the Boy’s Life adventurism of King Solomon, the movie is still brightly colored fun, shot by Charles Rosher (The Yearling, Show Boat). The lucky Granger is supported by two beauties who took full advantage of Rosher’s Technicolor mastery, flaming-haired Eleanor Parker and a radiant Janet Leigh.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Witness the Evolution of Cinematography with Compilation of Oscar Winners

This past weekend, the American Society of Cinematographers awarded Greig Fraser for his contribution to Lion as last year’s greatest accomplishment in the field. Of course, his achievement was just a small sampling of the fantastic work from directors of photography, but it did give us a stronger hint at what may be the winner on Oscar night. Ahead of the ceremony, we have a new video compilation that honors all the past winners in the category at the Academy Awards

Created by Burger Fiction, it spans the stunning silent landmark Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans all the way up to the end of Emmanuel Lubezki‘s three-peat win for The Revenant. Aside from the advancements in color and aspect ration, it’s a thrill to see some of cinema’s most iconic shots side-by-side. However, the best way to experience the evolution of the craft is by
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Final Years of King Baggot – From the ‘King of the Movies’ to Bit Player

The King Baggot Tribute will take place Wednesday September 28th at 7pm at Lee Auditorium inside the Missouri History Museum (Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park, St. Louis, Missouri). The 1913 silent film Ivanhoe will be accompanied by The Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra and there will be a 40-minute illustrated lecture on the life and career of King Baggot by We Are Movie Geeks’ Tom Stockman. A Facebook invite for the event can be found Here

Here’s a look at the final phase of King Baggot’s career.

King Baggot, the first ‘King of the Movies’ died July 11th, 1948 penniless and mostly forgotten at age 68. A St. Louis native, Baggot was at one time Hollywood’s most popular star, known is his heyday as “The Most Photographed Man in the World” and “More Famous Than the Man in the Moon”. Yet even in his hometown, Baggot had faded into obscurity.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Best Shot Peck Centennial: Roman Holiday & To Kill a Mockingbird

Gregory Peck was an instant sensation at the cinema. He was nominated for Best Actor in his very first year of the movies for The Keys of the Kingdom (1944) and the hits just kept on coming: The Yearling (1946), Gentleman's Agreement (1947), Twelve O'Clock High (1949). The Academy became less interested in nominating him after that the 1940s but for his Oscar winning and most iconic role (To Kill a Mockingbird) but audiences never stopped loving him. He had key hit films for over 30 years in his big screen career.

Though he was a very politically active liberal he was never interested in running for office himself but he  proved to be an influential politician within the industry itself as a key AMPAS president. 

For this week's Hit Me With Your Best Shot, in honor of Peck's Centennial, we gave participants the choice between what are arguably his two greatest films, Roman Holiday
See full article at FilmExperience »

Claude Jarman Jr. At "Rio Grande" 65Th Anniversary Screening, L.A. January 12th

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

The Royale Laemmle Theater in Los Angeles will be presenting a 65th anniversary screening of John Ford’s 1950 film Rio Grande. The film, which stars John Wayne, Maureen O’Hara, Ben Johnson, and Harry Carey, Jr., will be screened on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 at 7:00 pm.

Actor Claude Jarman, Jr., who appears in the film as Trooper Jefferson “Jeff” York, is scheduled to appear at a Q&A session after the film to discuss his role and career.

From the press release:

65Th Anniversary Screening Of Rio Grande, And Tribute To Maureen O’Hara

Tuesday, January 12, at 7:00 Pm at the Royal Theatre

As a tribute to Maureen O’Hara, we present the final chapter in director John Ford’s Cavalry trilogy (following Fort Apache and She Wore A Yellow Ribbon). Rio Grande works affecting variations on some of the director’s favorite themes. While there is an
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Day of the Dead List: Top 10 Most Piercingly Horrific Movie Screams

Top Ten Scream Queens: Barbara Steele, who both emitted screams and made others do same, is in a category of her own. Top Ten Scream Queens Halloween is over until next year, but the equally bewitching Day of the Dead is just around the corner. So, dead or alive, here's my revised and expanded list of cinema's Top Ten Scream Queens. This highly personal compilation is based on how memorable – as opposed to how loud or how frequent – were the screams. That's the key reason you won't find listed below actresses featured in gory slasher films. After all, the screams – and just about everything else in such movies – are as meaningless as their plots. You also won't find any screaming guys (i.e., Scream Kings) on the list below even though I've got absolutely nothing against guys who scream in horror, whether in movies or in life. There are
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Black Stallion

It was a winner right out of the starting gate, an instant classic that's still a pleasure for the eyes and ears. Carroll Ballard and Caleb Deschanel's marvel of a storybook movie has yet to be surpassed, with a boy-horse story that seems to be taking place in The Garden of Eden. The Black Stallion Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 765 1979 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 117 min. / Street Date July 14, 2015 / 39.95 Starring Kelly Reno, Mickey Rooney, Teri Garr, Clarence Muse, Hoyt Axton, Michael Higgins, Ed McNamara, Doghmi Larbi, John Karlsen, Leopoldo Trieste, Marne Maitland, Cass-Olé. Cinematography Caleb Deschanel Film Editor Robert Dalva Supervising Sound Editor Alan Splet Original Music Carmine Coppola Written by Melissa Mathison, Jeanne Rosenberg, William D. Wittliff from the novel by Walter Farley Produced by Fred Roos, Tom Sternberg Directed by Carroll Ballard

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Francis Coppola divided audiences with his war epic Apocalypse Now, but in the same
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Top Father's Day Films Ever Made? Here Are Five Dads - Ranging from the Intellectual to the Pathological

'Father of the Bride': Steve Martin and Kimberly Williams. Top Five Father's Day Movies? From giant Gregory Peck to tyrant John Gielgud What would be the Top Five Father's Day movies ever made? Well, there have been countless films about fathers and/or featuring fathers of various sizes, shapes, and inclinations. In terms of quality, these range from the amusing – e.g., the 1950 version of Cheaper by the Dozen; the Oscar-nominated The Grandfather – to the nauseating – e.g., the 1950 version of Father of the Bride; its atrocious sequel, Father's Little Dividend. Although I'm unable to come up with the absolute Top Five Father's Day Movies – or rather, just plain Father Movies – ever made, below are the first five (actually six, including a remake) "quality" patriarch-centered films that come to mind. Now, the fathers portrayed in these films aren't all heroic, loving, and/or saintly paternal figures. Several are
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'Birdman' cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki joins exclusive club with Oscar win

  • Hitfix
'Birdman' cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki joins exclusive club with Oscar win
By winning the Best Cinematography Oscar for a second year in a row, "Birdman" director of photography Emmanuel Lubezki has joined a truly elite club whose ranks haven't been breached in nearly two decades. Only four other cinematographers have won the prize in two consecutive years. The last time it happened was in 1994 and 1995, when John Toll won for Edward Zwick's "Legends of the Fall" and Mel Gibson's "Braveheart" respectively. Before that you have to go all the way back to the late '40s, when Winton Hoch won in 1948 (Victor Fleming's "Joan of Arc" with Ingrid Bergman) and 1949 (John Ford's western "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon"). Both victories came in the color category, as the Academy awarded prizes separately for black-and-white and color photography from 1939 to 1956. Leon Shamroy also won back-to-back color cinematography Oscars, for Henry King's 1944 Woodrow Wilson biopic "Wilson" and John M. Stahl
See full article at Hitfix »

From the ‘King of the Movies’ to Bit Player – the Final Years of King Baggot

The King Baggot Tribute will take place Friday, November 14th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium beginning at 7pm as part of this year’s St. Louis Intenational FIlm Festival. The program will consist a rare 35mm screening of the 1913 epic Ivanhoe starring King Baggot with live music accompaniment by the Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra. Ivanhoe will be followed by an illustrated lecture on the life and films of King Baggot presented by Tom Stockman, editor here at We Are Movie Geeks. After that will screen the influential silent western Tumbleweeds (1925), considered to be one of King Baggot’s finest achievements as a director. Tumbleweeds will feature live piano accompaniment by Matt Pace.

Here’s a look at the final phase of King Baggot’s career.

King Baggot, the first ‘King of the Movies’ died July 11th, 1948 penniless and mostly forgotten at age 68. A St. Louis native, Baggot
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

David O. Russell’s Hot Streak

By Mark Pinkert

Contributor



If David O. Russell gets nominated for Best Director this year, he will have accomplished something that Martin Scorsese, Woody Allen, Alfred Hitchcock, Francis Ford Coppola and many other great directors have not–that is, to earn three Best Director nominations in the span of only four years. In fact, only eleven other directors have been on comparable hot streaks in Academy Award history, and only one of those streaks (by Clint Eastwood) has occurred after 1960. (See below for reference.)

This is not a comparison of overall quality or career prolificity (not many can bout with Scorsese, Allen, Hitchcock and Coppola in those categories), but merely a tribute to Russell’s ultra-concentrated efforts in the past four years and a recognition of the difficulty of this feat. It’s also a relevant because it might shed some light on previous Oscar trends and on what we
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Top 15 Movies of This Past Year: Do Audiences Really Want Original, Quality Stories?

Top box office movies of 2013: If you make original, quality films… (photo: Sandra Bullock has two movies among the top 15 box office hits of 2013; Bullock is seen here in ‘The Heat,’ with Melissa McCarthy) (See previous post: “2013 Box Office Record? History is Remade If a Few ‘Minor Details’ Ignored.”) As further evidence that moviegoers want original, quality entertainment, below you’ll find a list of the top 15 movies at the domestic box office in 2013 — nine of which are sequels or reboots (ten if you include Oz the Great and Powerful), and more than half of which are 3D releases. Disney and Warner Bros. were the two top studios in 2013. Disney has five movies among the top 15; Warners has three. With the exception of the sleeper blockbuster Gravity, which, however dumbed down, targeted a more mature audience, every single one of the titles below were aimed either at teenagers/very,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Best Movies of Everybody's (Second) Favorite Year: From Caligari to Pollyanna

In Robert Wiene’s 1920 dreamlike horror classic, veteran German actor Werner Krauss plays the mysterious Dr. Caligari, the apparent force behind a creepy somnambulist named Cesare and played by Conrad Veidt, who abducts beautiful Lil Dagover. The finale in The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari has inspired tons of movies and television shows, from Fritz Lang's 1944 film noir The Woman in the Window to the last episode of the TV series St. Elsewhere. In addition, the film shares some key elements in common (suppposedly as a result of a mere coincidence) with Martin Scorsese and Leonardo DiCaprio's 2011 thriller Shutter Island. The 1920 crime melodrama Outside the Law is not in any way related to Rachid Bouchareb's 2010 political drama. Instead, the Tod Browning-directed movie is a well-made entry in the gangster genre (long before the explosion a decade later). Browning, best known for his early '30s efforts Dracula and Freaks,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'Woman Of The Year': 25 Things You Didn't Know About The Katharine Hepburn And Spencer Tracy-Led Classic

Fans of classic movies know that "Woman of the Year" marks the beginning of the 25-year partnership, on- and off-screen, between one of film's most beloved and enduring couples: Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy. Released 70 years ago today (on January 19, 1942), "Woman of the Year" came to define combustible romantic chemistry, thanks to the two fiery, evenly-matched leads. It launched a partnership that lasted until Tracy's death in 1967, a quarter-century union that resulted in nine films and an extramarital affair that was Hollywood's worst kept secret. What fans may not know is how the partnership came to be, who the real-life inspirations were for Hepburn's high-minded columnist and Tracy's earthy sportswriter, or the forgotten screen pairing of the two stars that came four years earlier. Read on for the untold story of "Woman of the Year" and its long afterlife in the realms of Broadway, TV, and magazines. 1. "Woman of the Year
See full article at Moviefone »
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