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Up Goes Maisie (1946)

Passed | | Comedy | 1 February 1946 (USA)
After graduating college Maisie becomes involved both professionally and personally Joe Morton, who's just developed a revolutionary helicopter.

Director:

Harry Beaumont

Writers:

Thelma Robinson (story and screenplay), Wilson Collison (based on character created by)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Ann Sothern ... Maisie Ravier
George Murphy ... Joseph Morton
Hillary Brooke ... Barbara Nuboult
Stephen McNally ... Tim Kingby (as Horace McNally)
Ray Collins ... Floyd Hendrickson
Jeff York ... Elmer Sauders
Paul Harvey ... Mr. J.G. Nuboult
Murray Alper ... Mitch O'Hara
Lewis Howard ... Bill Stuart
Jack Davis Jack Davis ... Jonathan Marbey
Gloria Grafton Gloria Grafton ... Miss Wolfe
John Eldredge ... Benson
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Storyline

In the ninth entry of this ten-film series, Maisie (Ann Sothern) graduates from business college and disguises herself as a spinsterish frump in order (based on eight past experiences) to keep wolfish prospective employees in line. She gets a job with Joseph Morton (George Murphy) who, with some other returning vets, has perfected an automatically-controlled helicopter. A double-crossing tycoon tries to beat the boys out of their invention, but Maisie discovers the plot and all ends well, but not before Maisie finds herself piloting the helicopter through downtown Los Angeles to a landing in the Pasadena Rose Bowl. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Sky High With Joy! See more »

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The ninth of ten movies starring Ann Sothern as the heroine Maisie Ravier. See more »

Goofs

While Maisie is flying the helicopter, she is seen flying from the left seat; except for the scenes where she is seen from behind. In the that scene she is clearly on the right side of the helicopter. See more »

Connections

Follows Swing Shift Maisie (1943) See more »

User Reviews

 
Maisie's helicopter ride is the film's only worthwhile stunt...
27 November 2007 | by DoylenfSee all my reviews

These MAISIE films were churned out with alarming regularity by MGM, obviously intended to amuse post-war audiences as the second feature on a double bill. They passed the time pleasantly enough, but it's hard to review them by today's standards since much of the material is as dated as can be.

Let's just say that ANN SOTHERN dispenses her usual charm and breezy style in the role of Maisie Revere, a gal who gets a job with an inventor (GEORGE MURPHY) who is trying to get his automatic helicopter on the market. Needless to say, Maisie and the inventor, played in his usual bland way by Murphy, soon find they have romance on their minds but little else in this silly script. Of course, she ends up saving the day by solo piloting the helicopter over downtown Los Angeles and landing in the Pasadena Rose Bowl for a grand touchdown.

It's as silly as all the other Maisie movies, but not as hard to take as some of them. STEPHEN McNALLY and HILLARY BROOKE are capable at playing the villains, but Maisie getting the wolf whistle routine from every other male in the cast is a bit much.

Trivia note: Watch for DON TAYLOR in soldier's uniform in an uncredited bit.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

1 February 1946 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Up Goes Maisie See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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