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Those Good Old Days (1941)

Approved | | Musical, Short | 16 August 1941 (USA)
Young Gloria's father and mother go out for the evening to see a television broadcast (yes, there was television in 1941!). Gloria's grandfather entertains her with stories about his days ... See full summary »

Director:

Jean Negulesco

Writer:

Jack Scholl (original screenplay)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
William T. Orr ... Joe La Rue
Jan Clayton ... Mrs. Joe La Rue - Formerly Miss Harris
Janet Chapman ... Gloria La Rue
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Storyline

Young Gloria's father and mother go out for the evening to see a television broadcast (yes, there was television in 1941!). Gloria's grandfather entertains her with stories about his days in vaudeville, and viewers see some of the musical numbers he performed with Gloria's grandmother those many years ago. Written by David Glagovsky <dglagovsky@prodigy.net>

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Genres:

Musical | Short

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

16 August 1941 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Melody Masters (1940-1941 season) #10: Those Good Old Days See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Warner Bros. See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Vitaphone production reel #369A. See more »

Soundtracks

Who's Your Honey Lamb?
(uncredited)
Music by M.K. Jerome
Lyrics by Jack Scholl
Performed by William T. Orr and Jan Clayton (vocal and dance)
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User Reviews

 
Were things REALLY better back in the good 'ol days?! Maybe not.
7 November 2018 | by MartinHaferSee all my reviews

There isn't a lot of plot to "Those Good Old Days". It begins with a couple leaving Gramps and their daughter at home while they go off to watch a television broadcast. The old man then regails his granddaughter about how great Vaudeville was. This consists of a couple singing a few very old fashioned numbers as well as the guy doing essentially a minstrel act without the black-face.

So what did I think? I think these sorts of songs do a lot to dispell the notion that things were better back in the old days! Schmaltzy musical numbers that are difficult to listen to or enjoy don't add up to an enjoyable short. Technically well made...just not something I'd want to see.

By the way, there WERE a few TV broadcasts in 1941. This year signaled CBS and NBC beginning television broadcasts. The lineup was scant and it was assumed the networks would gear up and get into TV sooner and in a bigger way, but the US entered WWII and television was all but dropped until after the war.


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