During the Nazi occupation of Rome in 1944, the Resistance leader, Giorgio Manfredi, is chased by the Nazis as he seeks refuge and a way to escape.

Director:

Roberto Rossellini

Writers:

Sergio Amidei (screenplay) (as A. Amidei), Federico Fellini (collaboration on screenplay) (as F. Fellini) | 4 more credits »
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Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 7 wins. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Aldo Fabrizi ... Don Pietro Pellegrini
Anna Magnani ... Pina
Marcello Pagliero Marcello Pagliero ... Giorgio Manfredi aka Luigi Ferraris
Vito Annichiarico Vito Annichiarico ... Piccolo Marcello
Nando Bruno Nando Bruno ... Agostino the Sexton
Harry Feist Harry Feist ... Major Bergmann
Giovanna Galletti ... Ingrid
Francesco Grandjacquet Francesco Grandjacquet ... Francesco
Eduardo Passarelli Eduardo Passarelli ... Neighborhood Police Sergeant (as Passarelli)
Maria Michi ... Marina Mari
Carla Rovere Carla Rovere ... Lauretta
Carlo Sindici Carlo Sindici ... Police Commissioner
Joop van Hulzen Joop van Hulzen ... Captain Hartmann (as Van Hulzen)
Ákos Tolnay Ákos Tolnay ... Austrian Deserter (as A. Tolnay)
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Storyline

The location: Nazi occupied Rome. As Rome is classified an open city, most Romans can wander the streets without fear of the city being bombed or them being killed in the process. But life for Romans is still difficult with the Nazi occupation as there is a curfew, basic foods are rationed, and the Nazis are still searching for those working for the resistance and will go to any length to quash those in the resistance and anyone providing them with assistance. War worn widowed mother Pina is about to get married to her next door neighbor Francesco. Despite their situation - Pina being pregnant, and Francesco being an atheist - Pina and Francesco will be wed by Catholic priest Don Pietro Pelligrini. The day before the wedding, Francesco's friend, Giorgio Manfredi, who Pina has never met, comes looking for Francesco as he, working for the resistance, needs a place to hide out. For his latest mission, Giorgio also requests the assistance of Don Pietro, who is more than willing as he sees... Written by Huggo

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Taglines:

Rossellini's Great Film of Our Time

Genres:

Drama | Thriller | War

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film was shot by using different kinds of available stock that were pieced together.These included the Leica stock that was being used by Italian cameramen to take home movies of American soldiers touring the sites of Rome, and the high quality Kodak stock used to make newsreel shorts of the time. See more »

Quotes

Pina: Have you known her long?
Giorgio Manfredi aka Luigi Ferraris: Four months. I'd just arrived in Rome. She used to eat in a certain restaurant. One day the air raid alarm went off and everyone ran. Just she and I were left. She just laughed. Wasn't scared at all.
Pina: And you fell in love.
Giorgio Manfredi aka Luigi Ferraris: It happens.
Pina: Yes, it does.
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Connections

Edited into Histoire(s) du cinéma: Le contrôle de l'univers (1999) See more »

Soundtracks

Mallinata Fiorentina
Composed by Giovanni D'Anzi
Lyrics by Michele Galdieri (as Galdieri)
(1941)
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User Reviews

 
A Turning Point In Film History
24 April 2005 | by gftbiloxiSee all my reviews

Photographed on scraps of film abandoned by German forces as they retreated from Rome toward the end of World War II, Roberto Rossellini's OPEN CITY was immediately hailed as a masterpiece of realism when it hit screens around the world in the late 1940s. Seen within the context of its time and with reference to the circumstances under which it was made, OPEN CITY is a staggering accomplishment; even so, by modern standards, it feels visually static and slightly contrived.

The great strength of the film is in the direct way Rossellini tells his story of Italian resistance fighters trying to dodge capture by the Nazis in occupied Rome--and in the performances of Anna Magnani and Aldo Fabrizi as two Italians who become increasingly caught up in resistance activities. But time has not been entirely kind to the film: the story seems somewhat superficial, portions of it lack expected intensity, and some performances seem more than a little artificial, with a lesbian subplot, the famous torture scenes, and Maria Mitchi's performance cases in point.

Ironically, these drawbacks actually result from comparisons with later, still more realistic films that followed its example--and it is a great tribute to the strength of the film that it survives the revolution it started as well as it does. (One does well to recall that at the time OPEN CITY was made such slick Hollywood films as MRS. MINIVER were considered the height of realism.) Still, because of these issues I would hesitate to recommend OPEN CITY as an introduction to Italian neo-realism for one not already well-versed in it. But those with an established appreciation of Italian cinema will find it very rewarding.

Gary F. Taylor, aka GFT, Amazon Reviewer


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Details

Country:

Italy

Language:

Italian | German | Latin

Release Date:

8 October 1945 (Italy) See more »

Also Known As:

Rome, Open City See more »

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Box Office

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$16,712
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Excelsa Film See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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