The Harvey Girls (1946) - News Poster

News

Angela Lansbury movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Manchurian Candidate,’ ‘Beauty and the Beast’

  • Gold Derby
Angela Lansbury movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Manchurian Candidate,’ ‘Beauty and the Beast’
In her 74 years in show business, Dame Angela Lansbury has become a legend in film, theater and television. She has been nominated for three Academy Awards and was bestowed with an honorary Oscar in 2013. In addition, she has won two Golden Globe Awards for her film work, as well as two additional nominations. She has also won five Tony Awards (from seven nominations) for her work in the theatre. It has been quite a career. She is one of the few performers equally known for all three entertainment genres, and for that effort she was recognized with a Kennedy Center Honors in 2000.

SEEEmmys 2018 exclusive: PBSMasterpiece’ categories for ‘Little Women,’ ‘The Child in Time’ and more

Yet the only major award to have eluded Dame Angela is the Emmy. Famously, she has been nominated 18 times for the golden statue and yet has never won the golden statue. All of her
See full article at Gold Derby »

Judy by the Numbers: "Look For The Silver Lining"

Anne Marie is tracking Judy Garland's career through musical numbers...

Believe it or not, 1946 actually represented a change of pace in Judy Garland's career. Judy only had three credits to her name that year: one starring role (The Harvey Girls), one cameo delayed by reshoots (Ziegfeld Follies), and one appearance in a biopic (Till The Clouds Roll By). In fact, this change of pace was a conscious choice on the part of Mr. & Mrs. Minnelli. If Judy looks like she's glowing a bit more than usual under those arclights, that's because Judy Garland was pregnant.

 

 

The Movie: Till The Clouds Roll By (1946)

The Songwriter: Jerome Kern (music), Buddy G. DeSylva (lyrics)

The Players: Judy Garland, Robert Walker, Van Heflin, June Allyson, Lucille Bremer, directed by Richard Whorf & Vincente Minnelli 

The Story: Till The Clouds Roll By is a Jerome Kern biopic, which (in the true MGM style) fabricates
See full article at FilmExperience »

Judy by the Numbers: "A Great Lady Has An Interview"

Anne Marie is tracking Judy Garland's career through musical numbers...

Our time travelling comes to an end this week with a movie that was filmed before The Harvey Girls but, due to expensive reshoots, wasn't released until months later. Ziegfeld Follies (not to be confused with Ziegfeld Girl) is a plotless series of excuses for MGM to throw its considerable stable of talent into a series of comic and musical sketches tailor made to show off the stars - and the studio - at their finest.

 

The Movie: Ziegfeld Follies (1946)

The Songwriters: Kay Thompson (lyrics), Roger Edens (music)

The Players: Judy Garland, Gene Kelly, Fred Astaire, William Powell, Esther Williams, directed by Vincente Minnelli 

The Story: According to rumor, originally this enjoyable little slip of a number was designed for Greer Garson. However, when Garson backed out, it became a number about Garson, lampooning her accent, image, and Oscar-bait dramatic roles.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Judy by the Numbers: "On The Atchison Topeka And The Santa Fe"

Anne Marie is tracking Judy Garland's career through musical numbers...

Though we last left Judy Garland in 1944 crooning from a trolley and cementing a (troubled) place in Hollywood history, this week we must catapult two years into the future to rejoin our musical heroine. The reason has to do with the odd nature of the Studio System in general and this series in specific. Judy Garland actually shot two movies between 1944 and 1945, but because one was delayed due to reshoots (therefore getting bumped to next week) and the other was a straight drama (therefore not fitting a series focused on musical numbers), we must travel through the end of WW2 and the beginning of Judy Garland's marriage to Vincente Minnelli. Thus, in 1946 we arrive in... the Old West? 

 

The Movie: The Harvey Girls (1946)

The Songwriters: Johnny Mercer (lyrics), Harry Warren (music)

The Players: Judy Garland, Angela Lansbury, Ray Bolger,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Can you pass HitFix's hard-harder-hardest Oscar Quiz?

  • Hitfix
Can you pass HitFix's hard-harder-hardest Oscar Quiz?
Last year HitFix threw down a 21-question quiz for Oscar fanatics, and this year we're at it again. Join us for an ultimate Oscar test featuring three tiers of difficulty: hard, harder, and hardest. Get out a notepad! The answers are on the next page. (Please note that the term "actor" can mean a man or a woman, and that any listed year refers to the time of the movie's release, not the year of the ceremony.) Hard 1. What's the highest-grossing of this year's eight Best Picture nominees? 2. Jennifer Jason Leigh just received her first Oscar nomination for Quentin Tarantino's The Hateful Eight. Only two performances in Quentin Tarantino's filmography have earned Academy Awards. Who performed those roles? 3. Which of this year's Best Picture nominees stars a character named Joy? 4. Who's the only person in history to win both an acting Oscar and a songwriting Oscar? 5. Name one
See full article at Hitfix »

Angela Lansbury: return of a star who shines ever brighter | Observer profile

After 40 years, the British-born actress who conquered Hollywood and starred in TV's Murder, She Wrote is back on the West End stage. As she approaches her 90s, she's in her theatrical prime

In the play Blithe Spirit, the wildly eccentric and chaotic clairvoyant Madame Arcati, Noël Coward's most colourful creation, announces that "time is the reef upon which all our frail mystic ships are wrecked".

No aphorism has ever applied less than this does to the actress now about to don the headscarves and bangles to play Arcati in the West End at the age of 88. Dame Angela Lansbury, ennobled earlier this month, has defied the laws of nature by becoming more theatrically prolific as her years have advanced. In 2007, she was Tony award-nominated for her role in a new Terrence McNally play, Deuce, on Broadway; in 2010, she was nominated again for a revival of Sondheim's A Little Night Music; and then,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Tarantino's Hateful 8 Screenplay Leak's Chosen Six?

Quentin TarantinoThe Hateful Eight’ screenplay leak Quentin Tarantino will no longer be making the Western The Hateful Eight. Why not? Well, Tarantino claims he sent out the film’s screenplay to a group of six people, one of whom allegedly showed it to his agent, who then showed it to other agents, who then began calling Tarantino’s agent Mike Simpson, asking him to cast their clients in the film. (Photo: The Hateful Eight screenwriter Quentin Tarantino.) “I’m very, very depressed,” Tarantino was quoted as saying at Deadline.com, which first broke The Hateful Eight Screenplay Leak story on Tuesday, January 21, 2014. “I finished a script, a first draft, and I didn’t mean to shoot it until next winter, a year from now. I gave it to six people, and apparently it’s gotten out today.” Now, before they begin flailing and wailing, Quentin Tarantino fans should be
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Top 15 Movies of This Past Year: Do Audiences Really Want Original, Quality Stories?

Top box office movies of 2013: If you make original, quality films… (photo: Sandra Bullock has two movies among the top 15 box office hits of 2013; Bullock is seen here in ‘The Heat,’ with Melissa McCarthy) (See previous post: “2013 Box Office Record? History is Remade If a Few ‘Minor Details’ Ignored.”) As further evidence that moviegoers want original, quality entertainment, below you’ll find a list of the top 15 movies at the domestic box office in 2013 — nine of which are sequels or reboots (ten if you include Oz the Great and Powerful), and more than half of which are 3D releases. Disney and Warner Bros. were the two top studios in 2013. Disney has five movies among the top 15; Warners has three. With the exception of the sleeper blockbuster Gravity, which, however dumbed down, targeted a more mature audience, every single one of the titles below were aimed either at teenagers/very,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Top 10 musicals

Musicals have been tap dancing their way into moviegoers' hearts since the invention of cinema sound itself. From Oliver! to Singin' in the Rain, here are the Guardian and Observer critics' picks of the 10 best

• Top 10 documentaries

• Top 10 movie adaptations

• Top 10 animated movies

• Top 10 silent movies

• Top 10 sports movies

• Top 10 film noir

• More Guardian and Observer critics' top 10s

10. Oliver!

Historically, the British musical has been intertwined with British music, drawing on music hall in the 1940s and the pop charts in the 50s – low-budget films of provincial interest and nothing to trouble the bosses at MGM. In the late 60s, however, the genre enjoyed a brief, high-profile heyday, and between Tommy Steele in Half a Sixpence (1967) and Richard Attenborough's star-studded Oh! What A Lovely War (1969) came the biggest of them all: Oliver! (1968), Carol Reed's adaptation of Lionel Bart's 1960 stage hit and the recipient of six Academy awards.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

L.A.’s Union Station Makeover Plans New Restaurant, Streamlined Train System

L.A.’s Union Station Makeover Plans New Restaurant, Streamlined Train System
The classic noir film “Union Station” (1950) showed the 1939 train depot in its heyday as the last of America’s great railway stations, even if L.A. subbed for Chicago in typical Hollywood fashion.

But “Blade Runner” (1982), another one of the hundreds of productions shot there, may be a more appropriate model for today’s jumble of uses that includes Amtrak trains, the Metro Rail subway, buses, filming and events that often take over the serene Spanish-tiled courtyards.

Some of the most significant architectural features of the Mission Revival building with Dutch Colonial Revival touches are hidden from travelers: The pristinely preserved Fred Harvey restaurant (he of “The Harvey Girls” fame), with its Streamline Moderne features and the soaring trussed ceilings of the main ticketing hall can only be seen by location crews or those attending private events.

But Union Station is prepping for a new era with a master plan
See full article at Variety - Film News »

L.A.’s Union Station Makeover Plans New Restaurant, Streamlined Train System

L.A.’s Union Station Makeover Plans New Restaurant, Streamlined Train System
The classic noir film “Union Station” (1950) showed the 1939 train depot in its heyday as the last of America’s great railway stations, even if L.A. subbed for Chicago in typical Hollywood fashion.

But “Blade Runner” (1982), another one of the hundreds of productions shot there, may be a more appropriate model for today’s jumble of uses that includes Amtrak trains, the Metro Rail subway, buses, filming and events that often take over the serene Spanish-tiled courtyards.

Some of the most significant architectural features of the Mission Revival building with Dutch Colonial Revival touches are hidden from travelers: The pristinely preserved Fred Harvey restaurant (he of “The Harvey Girls” fame), with its Streamline Moderne features and the soaring trussed ceilings of the main ticketing hall can only be seen by location crews or those attending private events.

But Union Station is prepping for a new era with a master plan
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Dd-Day on Friday: Don't Miss One of the Most Exuberant Performers in Movie History

Doris Day movies: TCM’s ‘Summer Under the Stars 2013′ lineup continues (photo: Doris Day in ‘Calamity Jane’ publicity shot) Doris Day, who turned 89 last April 3, is Turner Classic Movies’ 2013 “Summer Under the Stars” star on Friday, August 2. (Doris Day, by the way, still looks great. Check out "Doris Day Today.") Doris Day movies, of course, are frequently shown on TCM. Why? Well, TCM is owned by the megaconglomerate Time Warner, which also happens to own (among myriad other things) the Warner Bros. film library, which includes not only the Doris Day movies made at Warners from 1948 to 1955, but also Day’s MGM films as well (and the overwhelming majority of MGM releases up to 1986). My point: Don’t expect any Doris Day movie rarity on Friday — in fact, I don’t think such a thing exists. Doris Day is ‘Calamity Jane’ If you haven’t watched David Butler’s musical
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'Bye Bye Birdie': 25 Things You Didn't Know About the Classic Ann-Margret Musical

Today, it seems audiences know "Bye Bye Birdie" only from the prominent mention of it on "Mad Men," when the Sterling Cooper agency tried to copy Ann-Margret's minimalist opening number for a diet soda commercial. But when the movie musical premiered 50 years ago (on April 4, 1963), it was a huge smash. It made an instant star out of the Swedish-born actress, as well as boosting the fame of co-stars Dick Van Dyke and Paul Lynde. Based on the Broadway hit musical, "Bye Bye Birdie" was seen as a trenchant pop cultural satire at the time. Everyone knows that Conrad Birdie, the hip-swiveling rocker who is drafted into the Army, and who stages a publicity stunt on the Ed Sullivan show by agreeing to kiss a teen fan before reporting for duty, is inspired by Elvis Presley, who had to put his career on hold in 1958 when he was drafted. But
See full article at Moviefone »

Review: "Bye Bye Birdie" On Blu-ray From Twilight Time

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

Normal 0 false false false En-us X-none X-none

Bye Bye Birdie (1963) is an exuberant, squeaky clean musical comedy from Columbia Pictures that is based upon the 1960 Broadway musical of the same name. It is also extremely dated by today’s standards and flat-out corny at times. Overall, however, it is a fun ride that sports a good number of memorable musical interludes, the title song easily giving the viewer a severe case of earworm. Director George Sidney was no stranger to musicals as he was also responsible for Ziegfeld Follies (1945), The Harvey Girls (1946), Holiday in Mexico (1946), Annie Get Your Gun (1950), Showboat (1951) and Scaramouche (1952). Here, he brings to the screen the story of Kim MacAfee (twenty-two year-old Ann-Margret in her breakout performance) as a high school girl who becomes the envy of her peers when she is given the opportunity to kiss teen rock idol Conrad Birdie on the
See full article at CinemaRetro »

MGM musicals: All singing, all dancing

MGM meant musicals for more than a decade after the second world war. David Thomson looks at a time when a little cheer at the movies was appreciated – and wonders if the same couldn't be said now

There had been musicals before. In the 1930s, as soon as sound permitted, Warner Brothers developed what we call the Busby Berkeley pictures: they were black and white, and often aware of the harsh Depression times, but a choreographic lather of girls and fluid, orgasmic forms where the camera was itching to plunge into the centre of the "big O" – think of Footlight Parade, Gold Diggers of 1933 or 42nd Street. They had aerial shots of waves and whirlpools of chorus girls, opening and closing their legs in time with our desire. A few years later, at Rko Pictures, the Astaire-Rogers films came into being – where the gravity, beauty, and exhilaration of the
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Judy Fest: "The Harvey Girls"

Silly me. I had the greatest time at the Judy Garland festival at Lincoln Center this week and the movie I didn't write about Presenting Lily Mars was probably my favorite viewing experience. Rent it! Judy was just so funny in it, it was really charming and I liked her chemistry with Van Heflin (I confess I had to look him up since Shane had slipped my mind and I'd never seen his Best Supporting Actor Oscar performance for Johnny Eager (1941). Have any of you seen that one? Is it worth checking out?

But enough about Lily Mars... on to Judy in another incarnation. The Lincoln Center portion of the festival ends tomorrow though the celebration continues at the Paley Center for Television (since Judy did a lot of variety work on TV in the 50s). The last two films I caught were period musicals and here's the first of them.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Hallelujah! A Judy Garland Retrospective

The Lincoln Center and the Paley Center here in NYC have joined forces to celebrate the all-singing all-dancing legend that is Judy Garland

Shout 'Hallelujah', c'mon get happy!"

Once upon a time she was dubbed "The World's Greatest Entertainer." Few celebrities have ever earned their PR self-mythologizing titles the way Judy G did. There's just no beating her for musical pleasure and cathartic heartbreak. And as if her sensational singing and dancing weren't enough, she was a fine actress, too!

I missed the first week of the celebration being in Michigan but I'll see what I can catch for the remainder of the summer program which ends August 9th. If you're not in New York City, you can always follow along at home as best you can with an impromptu DVD festival.

 

Still to come in the festival are...

Young Judy:

Everybody Sing (1938), For Me and My Gal (1942), Presenting Lily Mars
See full article at FilmExperience »

All Singin., All Dancin., All Judy! July 26 – August 9

Impressive retrospective of Judy Garland.s films will feature 31 titles including a presentation of seldom seen short films and rarities as well as a special .sing-along. screening of The Wizard Of Oz.

On the occasion of what would have been Judy Garland.s 89th birthday, the Film Society of Lincoln Center and The Paley Center have announced the details today for Fslc.s comprehensive retrospective of the peerless film icon.s work, All Singin., All Dancin., All Judy! which will screen at the Walter Reade Theater July 26 . August 9 and The Paley Center.s comprehensive retrospective of Garland.s television work,Judy Garland: The Television Years which will be presented July 20 . August 18.

With autumn marking the 75th anniversary of Judy Garland’s feature film debut (Pigskin Parade, 1936), the Film Society of Lincoln Center will screen 31 titles from July 26 . August 9, including each of her big-screen acting performances, to pay tribute to
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Angela Lansbury's dream of a return to her mother's West End roots

Visiting the UK in tribute to her Labour leader grandfather, the Murder, She Wrote star reveals hope of capping her Hollywood career by appearing on the West End stage her mother once performed on

One of Britain's brightest and most durable stars of stage and screen, Angela Lansbury, is hoping to round off her Hollywood and Broadway career with a theatrical run on the West End stage where her mother performed.

"I really would love to play the Theatre Royal Haymarket, because that is where my mother played," she said. "It nearly happened last year, and if that venue could be guaranteed I would come. I only want someone to make the offer."

Lansbury, 85, is due to return to her native Britain next week to celebrate the life of her grandfather, George Lansbury, a founder of the Labour party. On the eve of her visit, she talked to the Observer about her English heritage,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Harvey's Girls | The Would-Be Ingenues: Where Are They Now, And What Happened Then

  • Pajiba
One of the stranger items of note this year, if you're into this sort of thing, has been the rise of Blake Lively. To those who merely observe, it's no different than the dawn of any other interchangeable big breasted blonde starlet. Those come around with the frequency of #22 buses and are rarely lasting.

But this particular star-forming has been interesting. TV girls, let alone those of the primetime soap genre, don't have the best track record with the transition to big screen success. Where some (Michelle Williams) have found critical success, others have either striven for popularity over acclaim, or simply didn't have the skills to ascend past their television status.

But Blake Lively is not only in the company of the small-screeners who've reached for the brass rail of film. She's in that elite club where the crash and burn is just as swift and harsh, but even
See full article at Pajiba »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites