A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (1945) - News Poster

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Giveaway – Win A Tree Grows In Brooklyn on Blu-ray

Eureka Entertainment releases A Tree Grows In

Brooklyn, Elia Kazan’s heartfelt and sentimental first feature, presented on Blu-ray from a 2K restoration as a part of The Masters of Cinema Series from 22 July 2019. We’ve got three copies to give away, so read on for details of how to enter…

Director Elia Kazan’s first film, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn shows that the filmmaker’s great empathy for his characters was already quite evident at this early juncture, and this endures as one of the most moving Hollywood dramas of the 1940s. Based on Betty Smith’s novel – a bestseller in the U.S. but also one of the most popular books among American soldiers overseas in WWII – Kazan’s debut is a sensitive, masterful adaptation.

Set among Brooklyn tenements circa 1912, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn is a portrait of the Nolans, an Irish-American family living in financially challenging circumstances,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Will Audrey Wells (‘The Hate U Give’) become the 10th writer to earn a posthumous Oscar nomination?

Will Audrey Wells (‘The Hate U Give’) become the 10th writer to earn a posthumous Oscar nomination?
The Hate U Give” screenwriter Audrey Wells took on an especially challenging task, adapting a bestselling young adult novel for the screen and addressing subjects like police brutality, crime and poverty in ways that would be accessible to teen viewers as well as an adult audience. Sadly, Wells didn’t live to see the film reach its audience. She died of cancer on October 4, 2018. The film opened the following day. Will she be commemorated with an Oscar nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay? She would be the 10th writer to be nominated posthumously.

A nomination for Wells wouldn’t just be a sentimental choice. The film earned rave reviews with a MetaCritic score of 82 and a Rotten Tomatoes freshness rating of 97%. She has already won prizes from critics in Indiana and Philadelphia, as well as online critics in Los Angeles. And she has been nominated by the Alliance of Women Film Journalists and critics from Utah.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Orson Welles (‘The Other Side of the Wind’) could be first-ever posthumous Best Director Oscar nominee

Orson Welles (‘The Other Side of the Wind’) could be first-ever posthumous Best Director Oscar nominee
Over his remarkable career in film, Orson Welles was the recipient of a trio of Oscar nominations, all for “Citizen Kane” (1941). That marked his feature film debut and is widely considered one of the greatest motion pictures ever produced. He, alongside Herman J. Mankiewicz, triumphed in Best Original Screenplay on the big night and, nearly three decades later, Welles earned an Honorary Oscar for his contributions to cinema.

Though Welles died in 1985, the filmmaker once again finds himself the talk of Oscar season, this time posthumously, with his final picture, “The Other Side of the Wind.”

The film, which made its world premiere at this year’s Venice Film Festival, stars two-time Oscar winner John Huston (who died in 1987) as Jake Hannaford, a washed-up, hard-drinking Hollywood director who vies to revive his career with an experimental film, full of sex and violence. Shot over several years in the 1970s, “The Other Side of the Wind
See full article at Gold Derby »

Elia Kazan movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘A Streetcar Named Desire,’ ‘On the Waterfront’

  • Gold Derby
Elia Kazan movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘A Streetcar Named Desire,’ ‘On the Waterfront’
Elia Kazan would have celebrated his 109th birthday on September 7, 2018. Years after his death in 2003, the two-time Oscar-winning director remains both an influential and controversial figure, respected and reviled in equal measure. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Kazan started his career as a stage actor, soon transitioning into directing. He mounted several landmark productions, including the original run of “A Streetcar Named Desire.” Throughout his career he received three Tony awards for Best Director of a Play: “All My Sons” in 1947, “Death of a Salesman” in 1949, and “J.B.” in 1959.

He transitioned into filmmaking with “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” (1945). Two years later, he won his first Oscar for Best Director for “Gentleman’s Agreement” (1947), which also took home Best Picture and Best Supporting Actress (Celeste Holm). A taboo-shattering drama about antisemitism, the film established
See full article at Gold Derby »

Elia Kazan movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Elia Kazan movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best
Elia Kazan would have celebrated his 109th birthday on September 7, 2018. Years after his death in 2003, the two-time Oscar-winning director remains both an influential and controversial figure, respected and reviled in equal measure. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Kazan started his career as a stage actor, soon transitioning into directing. He mounted several landmark productions, including the original run of “A Streetcar Named Desire.” Throughout his career he received three Tony awards for Best Director of a Play: “All My Sons” in 1947, “Death of a Salesman” in 1949, and “J.B.” in 1959.

He transitioned into filmmaking with “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” (1945). Two years later, he won his first Oscar for Best Director for “Gentleman’s Agreement” (1947), which also took home Best Picture and Best Supporting Actress (Celeste Holm). A taboo-shattering drama about antisemitism, the film established
See full article at Gold Derby »

The Forgotten: Tenement Gentleman

Bad Girl (1931) is a meaningless title because there's no bad girl in it, but visitors to the Museum of Modern Art's upcoming retrospective "William Fox Presents" (May 18 - June 5) will experience a rare pleasure when they're able to see this Frank Borzage pre-Coder, adapted from a novel and play by Vina Delmar, who later wrote The Awful Truth and Make Way for Tomorrow.Borzage is a master of sentiment so sincere it transcends the maudlin and attains a sublime Hollywood romanticism. Delmar can be more cynical, but her dry wit by no means cancels out her director's warmth. And they have three stars who prove very pure transmitters of these auteurs' joint world-view.It's a boy-meets-girl story, or actually more of a girl-meets-boy one (the end credits identify the main characters simply as "The Girl" and "The Boy). Like other Borzage pre-Codes such as Living on Velvet and Man's Castle,
See full article at MUBI »

They Live by Night

Don’t look to this noir for hardboiled cynicism – for his first feature Nicholas Ray instead gives us a dose of fatalist romance. Transposed from the previous decade, a pair of fugitives takes what happiness they can find, always aware that a grim fate waits ahead. The show is a career-making triumph and a real classic from Rko — which shelved it for more than a year.

They Live by Night

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 880

1948 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 95 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date June 13, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Cathy O’Donnell, Farley Granger, Howard Da Silva, Jay C. Flippen, Helen Craig, Will Wright, William Phipps, Ian Wolfe, Harry Harvey, Marie Bryant, Byron Foulger, Erskine Sanford .

Cinematography: George E. Diskant

Film Editor: Sherman Todd

Original Music: Leigh Harline

Written by Charles Schnee, Nicholas Ray from the novel Thieves Like Us by Edward Anderson

Produced by John Houseman

Directed by Nicholas Ray
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Daria Turns 20: 11 Things You Never Knew About the Iconic Show

Daria Turns 20: 11 Things You Never Knew About the Iconic Show
Ask a certain crowd of people what the defining MTV show of their childhood was, and it’s not Trl, or Real World or Jersey Shore. It’s Daria. Though Ms. Morgendorffer had been seen on Beavis and Butt-Head before, the March 3, 1997, premiere of Daria proved that the two shows couldn’t be more different. Let’s take a fond trip back to Lawndale for a closer look at the best animated misanthrope of the ‘90s.

1. B&B-h creator Mike Judge had no involvement in Daria

Judge agreed to release the character, but that’s where his involvement with the show ended.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

16 Stellar Films About Immigration For These Turbulent Times

Robert De Niro in ‘The Godfather: Part II’ (Courtesy: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

The first few days of Donald Trump’s presidency have been filled with a slew of sweeping policy changes that have garnered plenty of criticism — but the recent changes to America’s immigration policy have topped headlines. With an executive order that has been considered a Muslim ban by many, let’s take a look at some great films about immigration to the United States. There are plenty of them, but here is just a sampling of 16 that you should definitely watch.

A Better Life (2011): This film was directed by Chris Weitz and is a drama about a gardener in East L.A. who struggles to keep his son away from both gangs and immigration agents all while trying to give him opportunities he never had. A Better Life — written by
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Bad Girl

All sing the praises of Frank Borzage, a gentle director fully committed to the idea of romance in an imperfect world. Sally Eilers and James Dunn make a go of marriage, despite their personal flaws and difficulties with communication. It’s hard to believe that films of this vintage portray behaviors as sensitive as this.

Bad Girl

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1931 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 90 min. / Street Date December 13, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring James Dunn, Sally Eilers, Minna Gombell, Sarah Padden, William Pawley, Billy Watson.

Cinematography Chester A. Lyons

Film Editor Margaret Clancey

Written by Viña Delmar, Brian Marlow, Edwin J. Burke

Directed by Frank Borzage

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Directors don’t come any more romantic than Frank Borzage. It is said that he was one of several Fox directors, including John Ford, who were heavily influenced by F.W. Murnau, whose Sunrise was a massive hit in
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Boomerang!

Elia Kazan's third picture is a hard-hitting noir, a true story that honors the efforts of a noble States' Attorney when confronted with a murder case that was a little too open-and-shut. But a close read of the movie uncovers a miasma of social criticism, hiding behind the self-congratulating official narration. A great show. Boomerang! Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1947 / B&W / 1:37 flat full frame / 88 min. / Street Date November 15, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Dana Andrews, Jane Wyatt, Lee J. Cobb, Sam Levene, Arthur Kennedy, Cara Williams, Ed Begley, Taylor Holmes, Robert Keith. Cinematography Norbert Brodine Art Direction Richard Day, Chester Gore Film Editor Harmon Jones Original Music David Buttolph Written by Richard Murphy from an article in The Reader's Digest by Anthony Abbot (Fulton Oursier) Produced by Louis De Rochemont, Darryl F. Zanuck Directed by Elia Kazan

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

In just his second movie, director
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Neighborhood Threat: 1984’s "Los Sures" Looks at a Williamsburg That Didn’t See Gentrification Coming

  • MUBI
Mubi is exclusively showing Diego Echeverria's Los Sures (1984) in a new restoration September 3 - October 2, 2016.Williamsburg Savings BankThomas Wolfe’s short story “Only The Dead Know Brooklyn” first appeared in the June 15 1935 issue of The New Yorker. The story attempts to render spoken dialect into prose: its opening sentence is “Dere’s no guy livin’ dat knows Brooklyn t’roo an’ t’roo, because it’d take a guy a lifetime just to find his way aroun’ duh goddam town.” Wolfe’s mode and the story’s appearance in The New Yorker (the 1930s New Yorker was a very different magazine than it is today) speak to a particular 20th-century perception of the New York City borough of Brooklyn, both within New York itself and as far as the rest of the United States, and the world, was concerned. Brooklyn’s myth was as New York’s cynosure of rough-hewn authenticity.
See full article at MUBI »

Daily | Godard, Perez, Nqc

Writing for Criterion, Colin MacCabe sketches the evolution of Jean-Luc Godard's thinking and art from 1968 to 1980, the year Every Man for Himself was released. Girish Shambu remembers the late film historian, scholar and critic, Gilberto Perez. Peter Davis, whose mother, Tess Slesinger, was nominated for an Oscar for her screenplay for Elia Kazan's A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, argues that Hollywood didn't used to be so male. Also in the Nation, Stuart Klawans reviews Clint Eastwood's American Sniper and John Boorman's Queen and Country. Plus Mark Cousins's 50-week film course and much more in today's roundup of news and views. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | Godard, Perez, Nqc

Writing for Criterion, Colin MacCabe sketches the evolution of Jean-Luc Godard's thinking and art from 1968 to 1980, the year Every Man for Himself was released. Girish Shambu remembers the late film historian, scholar and critic, Gilberto Perez. Peter Davis, whose mother, Tess Slesinger, was nominated for an Oscar for her screenplay for Elia Kazan's A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, argues that Hollywood didn't used to be so male. Also in the Nation, Stuart Klawans reviews Clint Eastwood's American Sniper and John Boorman's Queen and Country. Plus Mark Cousins's 50-week film course and much more in today's roundup of news and views. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Good and Bad War-Themed Movies on Veterans Day on TCM

Veterans Day movies on TCM: From 'The Sullivans' to 'Patton' (photo: George C. Scott in 'Patton') This evening, Turner Classic Movies is presenting five war or war-related films in celebration of Veterans Day. For those outside the United States, Veterans Day is not to be confused with Memorial Day, which takes place in late May. (Scroll down to check out TCM's Veterans Day movie schedule.) It's good to be aware that in the last century alone, the U.S. has been involved in more than a dozen armed conflicts, from World War I to the invasion of Iraq, not including direct or indirect military interventions in countries as disparate as Iran, Guatemala, and Chile. As to be expected in a society that reveres people in uniform, American war movies have almost invariably glorified American soldiers even in those rare instances when they have dared to criticize the military establishment.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

What is the best Ya novel of all time? Round two

What is the best Ya novel of all time? Round two
Welcome to EW.com’s Ya novel bracket game. The field is down to 32 young adult books in our March-Madness style tournament that will determine which you think is the best of all time. Round two begins now.

In a stunning round one upset, Scott Westerfeld’s Uglies series beat Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight Saga. Others advancing include Little Women, Harry Potter and The Hunger Games.

Check out the full bracket and vote in round two below. Polls close on Sunday at 1 p.m. Et.

Little Women The Hobbit

Ask any young reader to name her literary role model,
See full article at EW.com - PopWatch »

What is the best Ya novel of all time? Round one

What is the best Ya novel of all time? Round one
Welcome to EW.com’s Ya novel bracket game. We’re pitting 64 young adult books against each other in a March-Madness style game to determine which you think is the best of all time. Round one begins below.

Check out the full bracket and vote!

Little Women The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Ask any young reader to name her literary role model, and chances are she’ll point to Jo March ­a headstrong, hot-headed heroine modeled after Alcott herself. But there’s more to Little Women than Jo alone; Alcott’s domestic tale is truly absorbing, complete with one
See full article at EW.com - PopWatch »

The Thirtysomething Teen: An Adult Ya Addict Comes Clean

  • Vulture
The Thirtysomething Teen: An Adult Ya Addict Comes Clean
As a full-grown adult, I’ve gotten my fair share of dubious looks and halfhearted utterances regarding my young-adult reading habits—“Oh, yeah, you like Harry Potter? So does my 8-year-old nephew!” “Sisterhood of the Traveling … ha-ha-ha-ha.” I’ve heard the behind-the-back jibes as well as the to-my-face criticisms that adult fans of Ya are stuck in some sad adolescent existence and, quite possibly, bringing down the collective Iq of our nation by reading below our grade level. Or that we’re just weird.Much of the Ya I read in my youth consisted of the foundational Judy Blume and Beverly Cleary books, stories that everyone I knew read. There were also the later books in Maud Hart Lovelace’s “Betsy-Tacy” series, and, most especially, Betty Smith’s A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, though they weren’t technically Ya, having been released before that classification really came into being, in the late sixties.
See full article at Vulture »

Ranking the Films of Director Elia Kazan (part 2): The Essentials

10: Gentleman’s Agreement

Perhaps a bit tame by today’s standards, but Kazan’s message drama was an extremely important film in 1947, marking one of the first times that the word Jew was explicity used in a Hollywood picture. Kazan was known throughout his career as a champion of social causes, and Gentleman’s Agreement earned him the first of two Best Director wins (out of five such nominations). Agreement follows a respected gentile journalist (Gregory Peck) hired by a magazine publisher (Albert Dekker) to write a gutsy expose about anti-Semitism. In order to deliver a true, honest and powerful story, he decides to present himself as Jewish everywhere he goes. Gregory Peck gives unquestionably the second best performance of his career. His strong, steady portrayal earned him a Best Actor nomination (although not a win).

- Ricky D

9: Wild River

Set during the early 1930s when American
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Ranking the Films of Director Elia Kazan (part 1) Underseen

Elia Kazan is one of my top five favourite American filmmakers of all time, and so I decided to ask our staff to rank his films. If you are not yet familiar with the filmmakers work, now would be a good time to start. Kazan was one of the most honoured and influential directors in Broadway and Hollywood history and introduced a new generation of unknown young actors to the world, including Marlon Brando, James Dean, Warren Beatty, Carroll Baker, Julie Harris, Andy Griffith, Lee Remick, Rip Torn, Eli Wallach, Eva Marie Saint, Martin Balsam, Fred Gwynne, and Pat Hingle. Noted for drawing out the best dramatic performances from his cast, he directed 21 actors to Oscar nominations, resulting in nine wins. The source for his inspired directing was the revolutionary acting technique known as the Method, and Kazan quickly rose to prominence as the preeminent proponent of the technique. During his career,
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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