Donald receives his birthday gifts, which include traditional gifts and information about Brazil (hosted by Zé Carioca) and Mexico (by Panchito, a Mexican Charro Rooster).

Writers:

Homer Brightman (story), Ernest Terrazas (story) | 8 more credits »
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Aurora Miranda ... The Brazilian Girl (as Aurora Miranda of Brazil)
Carmen Molina ... Mexico Girl (as Carmen Molina of Mexico)
Dora Luz ... Mexico Girl (as Dora Luz of Mexico)
Sterling Holloway ... Prof. Holloway (voice)
Clarence Nash Clarence Nash ... Donald Duck (voice)
Joaquin Garay Joaquin Garay ... Panchito (voice)
José Oliveira José Oliveira ... José Carioca (voice)
Frank Graham Frank Graham ... Narrator (voice)
Fred Shields ... Narrator (voice)
Nestor Amaral Nestor Amaral
Almirante Almirante
Trío Calaveras Trío Calaveras ... (as Trio Calaveras)
Trío Ascensio del Rio Trío Ascensio del Rio ... Themselves (as Ascencio Del Rio Trio)
Padua Hills Players Padua Hills Players ... Themselves
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Storyline

A large box arrives for Donald on his birthday, three gifts inside. He unwraps one at a time, and each takes him on an adventure. The first is a movie projector with a film about the birds of South America; Donald watches two cartoons, one tells of a penguin who longs to live on a tropical isle and the other about a gaucho boy who hunts the wild ostrich. The second gift is a pop-up book about Brazil. Inside is Jose Carioca, who takes Donald to Brazil's Bahia for a mix of animation and live action: the two cartoon birds sing and dance with natives. The third gift is a piñata, accompanied by Panchito. A ride on a magic serape takes the three amigos singing and dancing across Mexico. ¡Olé! Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Newest Idea Since "Snow White" See more »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In his first text story in 1943, Panchito was called "Pancho el Charro". This name was never reused. It means "Pancho the Horseman". "Charro" is a Mexican term for a traditional horseman, particularly associated with specific states of the federation. They are dressed in colorful clothing, with sombreros, heavily embroidered jackets and tightly cut trousers. They typically perform in the charreada, a competitive sport with some similarities to the rodeo. See more »

Goofs

When visiting Chile, the map shows several misspellings: Valparaiso is "Valpraiso" and the Juan Fernandez Islands are "Juan Ferndez Islands". On the postcard it says Vina del Mar instead of "Viña del Mar" See more »

Quotes

José Carioca: You kill my head!
See more »

Crazy Credits

In the end of the movie, the fireworks exploding of the title "Fin", "Fim" and "The End". See more »

Alternate Versions

There was an airing of this film for American television in the early 1980s which was extended to help it fit into a two-hour time slot. This was done by editing in selected shorts on similar themes. Among them were Pluto and the Armadillo, Clown of the Jungle, and Morris the Midget Moose. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Ritz (1976) See more »

Soundtracks

Pregoes carioca
(uncredited)
Music by João de Barro
Portuguese Lyrics by João de Barro as Carlos Braga
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User Reviews

 
A Historical Note
28 October 2006 | by GavnoSee all my reviews

Most everything about this neat little movie has been said by previous posters, except this.

The motivation for making it was, of all things, the US State Department! The US was deeply involved in fighting World War Two. At this point in time the average American knew almost NOTHING about South America, and the Nazi government was busy making business and political connections there, especially in Paraguay... there, transplanted Germans were a well established colony. They were aiding Hitler's war effort with the operation of industrial concerns, as well as providing espionage support.

South America promised to become a new battlefront if German successes and infiltration continued. The region produced vital strategic raw materials, key among them rubber.

Our strongest ally in the region was Brazil. The US Navy had a number of installations there, both sea and air. The Brazilian Navy worked closely with US forces in hunting U-boats in the Atlantic narrows; a number of US Navy vessels were transferred to them. American air bases (the largest of which was at Recife) provides home base for American aircraft, both fixed wing and lighter than air blimps, to provide air support coverage to trans Atlantic convoy operations.

The State department felt it would be a good idea to familiarize Americans with the land, people, and way of life of South America, and called on Disney to produce THE THREE CABALLEROS. The movie was, first and foremost, a TEACHING TOOL for both military forces and the general public during a global war.

BTW... I love the crazy little bird too! HE'S the best part of the film!

There are two other Disney films made for the Government that I'd LOVE to find copies of.

One is VICTORY THROUGH AIR POWER, another WW2 product.

The other is one that I saw back in Basic Training in the 1970s. Believe it or not, the Walt Disney studios produced a military training film on the prevention of VENEREAL DISEASE!!! The unfortunate Lady dispensing said commodity bore a VERY striking resemblance to Snow White!

Because of that film I can never view SNOW WHITE in quite the same way ever again!


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Details

Official Sites:

Disney's Official Site

Country:

USA | Mexico

Language:

English | Spanish | Portuguese

Release Date:

22 February 1945 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Surprise Package See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound System)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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