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The Dead Don't Die Original Soundtrack Gets Vinyl Release in September

The Dead Don't Die Original Soundtrack Gets Vinyl Release in September
The Dead Don't Die is writer/director Jim Jarmusch's unique, semi-comic take on the zombie apocalypse genre. As with his recent efforts Only Lovers Left Alive and Paterson, the film's score was composed and performed by Sq&#220Rl, the band Jarmusch and producer Carter Logan founded in 2009. Sacred Bones Records, the same label that released the band's Ep #260 in 2017, is releasing the LP edition of the score.

The score to the The Dead Don't Die is a true expression of where Sq&#220Rl stand at the center of a decade of sonic exploration. It is the culmination of their passion for analog synths, with guitar violence reverberating from the darker corners of Americana. It is at once a tribute to the classic sounds of horror and sci-fi, as well as a decapitation of traditional film scores. It is naturally supernatural.

From their arsenal of tools, Jim Jarmusch and Logan
See full article at MovieWeb »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Tarantula! (1955)

Back we go the golden age of the drive-in, or at least what many see as the ideal time freeze of a continent; family values, mom and dad and the kids loading into the car for a wholesome night under the sky. But the most popular films on the outdoor screen were the horror movies, and those were hitting their very own genre idealism with Atomic Horror, led off by 1954’s Them!, which brought giant ants from their hills to Hollywood’s with resounding success. It was open season on gargantuan critters after that, and first out of the gate was Tarantula! (1955), melding together a larger than life spider with some mad scientist action to create a unique and fun addition to the canon.

As a matter of fact, Tarantula! stands as one of the best B’s from the era; solid performances and pretty damn great special effects help
See full article at DailyDead »

When Calls the Heart Season 6 Episode 6 Review: Disputing Hearts

A growing town can be a town in trouble.

On When Calls the Heart Season 6 Episode 6, when Henry buys mineral rights to certain properties in Hope Valley, feuds erupt. But that may not be his only worry once he strikes oil on the land he bought from Jesse.

Elsewhere, Florence gets her first job, and Elizabeth worries about Allie's inability to connect with other children.

Let's not beat aroud the bush. All of what I've already listed isn't anywhere near as distressing as what's happening with Rosemary.

When we first saw that she was going to be talking with Carson about her health, I thought she might be concerned because she hadn't conceived a child yet.

After all, she's seeing what a joy it is to raise a child as she and Leland are very connected to Elizabeth and little Jack.

But now I'm not so sure.

Rosemary is throwing herself into her work.
See full article at TVfanatic »

Tribeca Film Review: ‘Swallow’

  • Variety
Tribeca Film Review: ‘Swallow’
Pica, or the compulsion to consume things nowhere to be found on the food pyramid — like handfuls of dirt, stray pieces of jewelry, or a juicy double-a battery — serves as a metaphor for one woman’s struggle against the patriarchy in Carlo Mirabella-Davis’ “Swallow.” A bold and unconventional thriller made real by the evolution of lead actress Haley Bennett (a prize winner at the Tribeca Film Festival) from porcelain housewife to jagged-edged reactionary, this striking debut (not counting earlier shorts or co-directed behind-the-music doc ”The Swell Season”) ignores the medical side of the eating disorder in favor of a far more radical psychological reading.

While not as graphic as 2013 German shocker “Wetlands” (with its grimy public toilet seats and queasy scenes of tampon swapping) nor as gory as 2002’s “In My Skin” (which took the concept of “cutting” to extremes), “Swallow” adopts the same basic strategy as those films, using
See full article at Variety »

‘Giraffes on Horseback Salad,’ Salvador Dalí’s Would-Be Marx Brothers Movie, Is Now a Graphic Novel

The Marx Brothers made 13 feature films throughout their one-of-a-kind career, but one they didn’t make continues to capture the interest of devoted fans. “Giraffes on Horseback Salad,” a would-be movie for the cinematic siblings written by none other than Salvador Dalí, was considered lost after being rejected by MGM. Josh Frank, artist Manuela Pertega, and Tim Heidecker have taken it upon themselves to adapt the story into a graphic novel.

The trio will unveil the project after a “Duck Soup” screening at the Quad later this month, and IndieWire has an exclusive excerpt to whet your appetite in the meantime.

Here’s the synopsis: “A businessman named Jimmy (played by Harpo) is drawn to the mysterious Surrealist Woman, whose very presence changes humdrum reality into Dalí-esque fantasy. With the help of Groucho and Chico, Jimmy seeks to join her fantastical world — but forces of normalcy threaten to end their romance.
See full article at Indiewire »

NYC Weekend Watch: Lee Chang-dong, ‘Flight of the Red Balloon,’ Yorgos Lanthimos & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of Modern Art

A full Lee Chang-dong retrospective has begun, with the director attending multiple screenings.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

The films of Yorgos Lanthimos, both familiar and not, are given a full retrospective.



Metrograph

Two of Hou Hsiao-hsien’s 21st-century movies are playing on prints provided by the director, while Hitchcock’s Spellbound screens on 35mm.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Selznicked: Hollywood Star Producer David O. Selznick

  • MUBI
Once upon a time, in a long-forgotten early Hollywood before David O. Selznick was the most famous movie producer of his time, the term "Selznicked" was coined to describe someone who had just lost their shirt. Such was the impact of the rags-to-riches-to-rags story of Lewis Selznick, David’s pioneering movie industry father. Lewis, a Russian Jewish immigrant, was a flash-in-the-pan success during the silent era, earning and then going on to lose something like $11 million dollars in the course of a decade. In fact, one of the most powerful and longest-reigning moguls of classical Hollywood, Louis B. Mayer, had a grudge against the young Selznick that would have killed most movie careers in the cradle. He warned his besotted daughter Irene that David would amount to nothing ("a bum like his father"), and refused to give the upstart a job at MGM until pressed by other colleagues. Mayer, like the rest of Hollywood elite,
See full article at MUBI »

Remembering Mark Urman, an Independent Film Stalwart Gone Too Soon

Remembering Mark Urman, an Independent Film Stalwart Gone Too Soon
The following remembrance was written by Deborah Davis, Mark Urman’s wife.

From Anatole Litvak’s “Anastasia,” the first movie he saw as a child at a picture palace in the Bronx, to Bradley Cooper’s “A Star Is Born” (his choice for this year’s Best Picture), Mark Urman was a man with a boundless passion for cinema. In the course of his nearly 50 years in film, Mark felt blessed to work with some of the greatest luminaries in the business, from Joseph Losey, David Lean, and Bernardo Bertolucci to Roman Polanski, Sydney Lumet, and Julian Schnabel.

He also delighted in encouraging talents as they emerged, including Ryan Gosling, Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck, Lynette Howell, Jamie Patricof, Christian Bale, Liv Tyler, Marc Forster, Natasha Richardson, Trey Parker and Matt Stone, Kevin Smith, Cary Fukunaga, Lee Daniels, and Bill Condon.

Mark was born in the Bronx on November 24, 1952, the
See full article at Indiewire »

The key to ‘First Man’s’ best chance of landing an Oscar? That heavenly theremin-heavy score

The key to ‘First Man’s’ best chance of landing an Oscar? That heavenly theremin-heavy score
When “First Man,” about the events surrounding Neil Armstrong taking his first steps on the lunar surface in 1969, touched down at film festivals in the fall, critics in attendance were over the moon for its visual effects and technical achievements as well as for the performances of Ryan Gosling as Armstrong and Claire Foy as his wife, Janet.

But Damien Chazelle‘s follow-up to “La La Land” didn’t quite blast off box-office-wise when it opened in theaters on Oct. 12. It came in third with a gross of $16 million in its first weekend, but ended up with a disappointing total of $45 million domestic and $55 million overseas. In comparison, 2016’s “La La Land” took in $151 domestic and $446 million worldwide. The festival frenzy never carried over to the public and its hopes for picture, directing screenplay and acting nominations — save for Foy, who was up for supporting actress at the Golden Globes — fizzled

There are,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Mark Urman, Veteran Independent Film Distributor, Dies at 66

  • Variety
Mark Urman, Veteran Independent Film Distributor, Dies at 66
Mark Urman, a veteran independent film distributor who headed Paladin Films for the past decade, died on Saturday after a short illness. He was 66.

Urman executive produced “Monster’s Ball” and “Murderball,” and was involved in campaigns for Oscar contenders “Half Nelson,” “Affliction,” and “Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead.” He broke into the entertainment business in the 1980s by working in publicity at United Artists in New York, followed by Columbia PicturesTriumph Films and Dennis Davidson Associates.

In 1997, he became a distribution executive at Cinepix Film Properties, which became Lionsgate. He moved to ThinkFilm in 2001 to head theatrical distribution and oversaw the release of “Half Nelson,” for which Ryan Gosling received a best actor Academy Award nomination; Oscar-winning documentaries “Taxi to the Dark Side” and “Born Into Brothels”; and docs “Spellbound,” “The Story of the Weeping Camel,” “Murderball,” and “War/Dance.”

After a brief stint at Senator,
See full article at Variety »

Mark Urman, Veteran Film Distributor, Dies at 66

Mark Urman, Veteran Film Distributor, Dies at 66
Veteran independent film executive Mark Urman died Saturday after a short bout with cancer, IndieWire has confirmed. He was 66. His family requests privacy, and advised a statement will be coming in the next few days.

The Union College graduate started out in the international publicity department at United Artists in New York, followed by publicity posts at Columbia Pictures and the studio’s Triumph Films, and PR firm Dennis Davidson and Associates. In 1997, he left Dda to join Cinepix Film Properties, then just acquired by Lions Gate Entertainment Corp., as the head of U.S. distribution.

That was the start of a passionate career in specialized film, including multiple Oscar contenders like “Monsters Ball,” “Affliction,” and “Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead.”

As distribution president at New York indie distributor ThinkFilm, Urman delivered seven Academy Award nominations in six years. Alex Gibney’s “Taxi to the Dark Side” and
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Mark Urman, Veteran Film Distributor, Dies at 66

Mark Urman, Veteran Film Distributor, Dies at 66
Veteran independent film executive Mark Urman died Saturday after a short bout with cancer, IndieWire has confirmed. He was 66. His family requests privacy, and advised a statement will be coming in the next few days.

The Union College graduate started out in the international publicity department at United Artists in New York, followed by publicity posts at Columbia Pictures and the studio’s Triumph Films, and PR firm Dennis Davidson and Associates. In 1997, he left Dda to join Cinepix Film Properties, then just acquired by Lions Gate Entertainment Corp., as the head of U.S. distribution.

That was the start of a passionate career in specialized film, including multiple Oscar contenders like “Monsters Ball,” “Affliction,” and “Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead.”

As distribution president at New York indie distributor ThinkFilm, Urman delivered seven Academy Award nominations in six years. Alex Gibney’s “Taxi to the Dark Side” and
See full article at Indiewire »

From Beyoncé to Sorry to Bother You: the new age of Afro-surrealism

From psychedelic sketch shows to far-out satire, black artists are expressing the absurdity of life in a racist society by embracing the disturbing and bizarre

There he was, dangling into the void. Sinking, arms outstretched, helplessly clawing at the air. Jordan Peele’s satirical horror Get Out introduced us to the “sunken place”, a purgatory where Daniel Kaluuya’s character is trapped by body-snatching white liberals. As otherworldly as the Salvador Dalí-designed dream sequence in Alfred Hitchcock’s Spellbound, it was the scene that planted Afro-surrealism firmly in the mainstream.

It also symbolised the revival of a genre in which strangeness and blackness not only co-exist but are impossible to separate. In recent years we’ve had Atlanta, a show its creator Donald Glover proudly called a “black Twin Peaks”, and a host of film-makers including Kahlil Joseph, Arthur Jafa and Jenn Nkiru, who have given a hallucinatory edge
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina Episode 7 Review - Chapter Seven: Feast of Feasts

It's Thanksgiving in Greendale, and wait until you see what's on the menu for the holiday feast!

This Chilling Adventures of Sabrina review contains spoilers. We have a spoiler-free review of the entire first season here.

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina Episode 7

"Wait, are we seriously talking about cannibalism?"

It's Thanksgiving in Greendale, and everyone is getting ready for a big holiday meal. And by everyone, I mean the witches and warlocks...and by big meal, I mean Eating An Actual Witch. In a twist that I will shamelessly call delicious, the Feast of Feasts is the Church of Night's annual celebration of the Satan's love in which one lucky witch or warlock gets to win a Shirley Jackson-esque lottery and become the main course at a dinner in his honor.

To the devoted, there is "no greater honor" than to be eaten. As eventual winner Prudence explains, the Queen
See full article at Den of Geek »

Ingrid Bergman movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Casablanca,’ ‘Gaslight,’ ‘Notorious’

  • Gold Derby
Ingrid Bergman movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Casablanca,’ ‘Gaslight,’ ‘Notorious’
August 29 marks the 103rd anniversary of the birth of legendary film star Ingrid Bergman. Born in Stockholm, she was working in Swedish and German films during the 1930s, when one of her Swedish films, 1936’s “Intermezzo,” caught the eye of powerful Hollywood producer David O. Selznick. He announced that he planned to remake “Intermezzo” in English and would bring Bergman to Hollywood to star. The only problem was that Bergman didn’t speak English, but she turned out to be a fast learner, and the combination of her work ethic and her radiant beauty put Bergman well on her way to becoming an authentic movie star.

Not only did Bergman become an audience favorite, but her acting skills earned her the respect of moviegoers and Hollywood producers alike. In the course of her four-decade film career, Bergman was nominated for seven Academy Awards, winning three for “Gaslight,” “Anastasia” and “Murder on the Orient Express
See full article at Gold Derby »

Ingrid Bergman movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Ingrid Bergman movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best
August 29 marks the 103rd anniversary of the birth of legendary film star Ingrid Bergman. Born in Stockholm, she was working in Swedish and German films during the 1930s, when one of her Swedish films, 1936’s “Intermezzo,” caught the eye of powerful Hollywood producer David O. Selznick. He announced that he planned to remake “Intermezzo” in English and would bring Bergman to Hollywood to star. The only problem was that Bergman didn’t speak English, but she turned out to be a fast learner, and the combination of her work ethic and her radiant beauty put Bergman well on her way to becoming an authentic movie star.

Not only did Bergman become an audience favorite, but her acting skills earned her the respect of moviegoers and Hollywood producers alike. In the course of her four-decade film career, Bergman was nominated for seven Academy Awards, winning three for “Gaslight,” “Anastasia” and “Murder on the Orient Express
See full article at Gold Derby »

Rip, Barbara Harris: Another Alfred Hitchcock Actor Passes, But These 24 Remain

  • Indiewire
Rip, Barbara Harris: Another Alfred Hitchcock Actor Passes, But These 24 Remain
In the last shot of Alfred Hitchcock’s final (and underrated) “Family Plot,” impostor-psychic-turned-kidnapper Barbara Harris looks straight at the camera and winks. It was only time in Hitchcock’s career that he broke down the fourth wall, and the gesture felt like his goodbye to his fans.

Harris died August 21 at 83 of lung cancer. Her notable roles included “A Thousand Clowns,” “Nashville,” “The Seduction of Joe Tynan,” and a supporting actor Oscar nomination for “Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me?” But for Hitchcock fans, her death reminds us that 42 years have passed since the master’s last film, and fewer of his actors are still alive.

It’s nearly impossible to track every actor who appeared in his work. (Anyone from Hitchcock’s early British films would have had to be a very small child.) However, there are still a number
See full article at Indiewire »

Alfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Vertigo,’ ‘Psycho,’ ‘North by Northwest’

  • Gold Derby
Alfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Vertigo,’ ‘Psycho,’ ‘North by Northwest’
Alfred Hitchcock celebrates his 119th birthday on August 13. Born in 1899, the director has long been revered as one of the most influential filmmakers of all time. He also holds the unfortunate distinction of being one of Oscar’s biggest losers, with five Best Director nominations and no wins. Still, who needs an Oscar when you’ve impacted world cinema as significantly as “Hitch” has? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 25 of his greatest films, ranked from worst to best.

Known as “the Master of Suspense,” Hitchcock cut his teeth directing silent movies in his native England. With films like “The Lodger” (1927), he gained a reputation for helming tense and stylish psychological thrillers. With the invention of sound came an added element to Hitchcock’s work: a sly sense of humor.

He moved to America in 1940 to direct two films that earned Best Picture nominations: “Foreign Correspondent” and “Rebecca,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Alfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Alfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Alfred Hitchcock celebrates his 119th birthday on August 13. Born in 1899, the director has long been revered as one of the most influential filmmakers of all time. He also holds the unfortunate distinction of being one of Oscar’s biggest losers, with five Best Director nominations and no wins. Still, who needs an Oscar when you’ve impacted world cinema as significantly as “Hitch” has? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 25 of his greatest films, ranked from worst to best.

Known as “the Master of Suspense,” Hitchcock cut his teeth directing silent movies in his native England. With films like “The Lodger” (1927), he gained a reputation for helming tense and stylish psychological thrillers. With the invention of sound came an added element to Hitchcock’s work: a sly sense of humor.

He moved to America in 1940 to direct two films that earned Best Picture nominations: “Foreign Correspondent” and “Rebecca,
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Science Fair’ Trailer: Sundance Audience Favorite Could be the Next ‘Spellbound’

‘Science Fair’ Trailer: Sundance Audience Favorite Could be the Next ‘Spellbound’
There’s something inexplicably compelling about watching brilliant young minds engage in cutthroat competition with each other. It’s part of what made the chess film “Searching for Bobby Fischer” an instant classic in 1993, and what led to an Oscar-nomination for the 2002 spelling bee documentary “Spellbound.” The “Spellbound” formula is put to the test once again in “Science Fair,” the new documentary from the Emmy-nominated filmmaking team of Cristina Costantini and Darren Foster, which won the inaugural Festival Favorite Award at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year.

Per the official synopsis: “‘Science Fair’ follows nine high school students from around the globe as they navigate rivalries, setbacks and, of course, hormones, on their journey to compete at The International Science and Engineering Fair. As 1,700 of the smartest, quirkiest teens from 78 different countries face off, only one will be named Best in Fair. The film offers a front seat to the victories,
See full article at Indiewire »
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