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Scarlet Street (1945) Poster

Trivia

Twelve paintings done for the film by John Decker were sent to the Museum of Modern Art in New York City for exhibition in March of 1946.
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Director Fritz Lang and three of the stars (Edward G. Robinson Joan Bennett and Dan Duryea) also made the similarly themed The Woman in the Window (1944).
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One of Fritz Lang's personal favorites of his own films.
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Is the first of two remakes Fritz Lang made of Jean Renoir's films. Whilst La Chienne (1931) inspired "Scarlet Street (1945)" (1945), La Bête Humaine (1938) inspired Human Desire (1954). Notoriously, Renoir disliked both.
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The failure of the original copyright holder to renew the film's copyright resulted in it falling into public domain, meaning that virtually anyone could duplicate and sell a VHS/DVD copy of the film. Therefore, many of the versions of this film available on the market are either severely (and usually badly) edited and/or of extremely poor quality, having been duped from second- or third-generation (or more) copies of the film.
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According to Ben Mankiewicz on TCM, when first released, local censor boards in New York, Milwalkee and Atlanta banned this film entirely, for being "licentious, profane, obscure, and contrary to the good order of the community".
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The car Johnny pulls up in is a 1935 Packard Super Eight Sport Phaeton. In 2016 these cars can fetch well into six figures at auction.
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This film is in the Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound collection of the Library of Congress.
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The Library of Congress: From the Collection of The Motion Picture, Broadcasting & Recorded Sound Division.
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Robinson's character talks loving about art and says he wishes he owned a Cezanne. In real life, Robinson was a great collector of fine art and was considered an expert.
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The two paintings Dan Duryea tries to pawn, and later leaves with the artist displaying his work on the street, turned up in 1964 in the window of Reginald Gardiner's art gallery in Burke's Law: Who Killed What's His Name? (1964).
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