The Wolf Man and Count Dracula beg Dr. Edelman to cure them of their killing instincts but Dracula schemes to seduce the doctor's nurse.

Director:

Erle C. Kenton

Writer:

Edward T. Lowe Jr. (original screenplay) (as Edward T. Lowe)
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2 wins & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Lon Chaney Jr. ... Lawrence Talbot / The Wolf Man (as Lon Chaney)
John Carradine ... Dracula / Baron Latos
Martha O'Driscoll ... Miliza Morelle
Lionel Atwill ... Police Inspector Holtz
Onslow Stevens ... Dr. Franz Edlemann
Jane Adams ... Nina
Ludwig Stössel ... Siegfried (as Ludwig Stossel)
Glenn Strange ... The Frankenstein Monster
Skelton Knaggs ... Steinmuhl
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Storyline

Dracula arrives at Dr. Edelman's office asking for a cure to his vampirism. However, this is a ruse by Dracula to get near Dr. Edelman's beautiful female assistant and turn her into a vampire. Meanwhile, a sincere Lawrence Talbot, AKA the Wolfman, arrives seeking a cure for his lycanthropy. When Dr. Edelman's first attempt fails, Talbot tries to commit suicide by jumping off a cliff, but instead finds a network of underground caves where Frankensteins Monster is in stasis. Chaos ensues as the three monsters fight for dominance of each other. Written by Norman Cook <cook@ssdgwy.mdc.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

HORROR UPON HORROR in the HOUSE OF DRACULA See more »

Genres:

Fantasy | Horror | Sci-Fi

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Shot September 21-October 25, 1945, released December 7. Last of Universal's original FRANKENSTEIN series of seven films, except for 1948'S Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (1948). See more »

Goofs

The film is set in 1880. In one scene a character is seen reading "Newsweek" magazine, which didn't begin publication until 1933. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Dr. Edelman: What are you doing here? Who are you?
Count Dracula: I am Baron Latos. I have come to you for help.
Dr. Edelman: It's five o'clock in the morning.
Count Dracula: I must apologize for the intrusion. But travel is very difficult for me, and I've come a long way.
Dr. Edelman: I don't understand.
Count Dracula: Perhaps you will, after you've led me to the basement room of this castle.
Dr. Edelman: Eh - a very strange request. This castle is my home!
Count Dracula: Have no fear, doctor. Had conditions permitted, I would have presented myself in the usual manner.
Dr. Edelman: Well, it is most unusual...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

Opening credits ooze down from the top of the screen, ending in a straight line of words. See more »

Connections

Follows Dracula's Daughter (1936) See more »

Soundtracks

Piano Sonata No. 14 in C minor 'Quasi una fantasia', Op. 27, No. 2, popularly known as the 'Moonlight Sonata'
Written by Ludwig van Beethoven
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User Reviews

 
House of Dracula (1945) **1/2
1 June 2005 | by JoeKarlosiSee all my reviews

There has been a debate raging for Universal Monster fans over the decades as to what's the better film -- "House of Frankenstein" or "House of Dracula"? For me, I may prefer HOUSE OF FRANKENSTEIN, but I certainly wouldn't count out an evening with this one, the final "serious" entry in Universal's classic monster series. It's still pretty good, though I feel its main problem is just being a victim of familiarity and nowhere else to really go at this stage. At least "Frankenstein" was a fresh idea at the time, while "Dracula" repeats the old formula again and reveals that our favorite cherished monsters had reached their limitations.

Dracula (John Carradine) arrives at the home of the kindly Dr. Edelmann (Onslow Stevens) to seek a cure from his vampirism. At the same time, the Wolf Man (Lon Chaney) shows up looking for release from his lycanthropy. Through a series of chaotic events, the warm hearted doctor turns into a Jekyll/Hyde madman and becomes intent on reviving the Frankenstein Monster (Glenn Strange). Throw in a pretty "hunchback" nurse and you've got what the ads curiously touted as "FIVE Monsters!"

What "House of Dracula" has going for it is more of that vintage Universal atmosphere and soothing music soundtrack, and a superb dual performance from Onslow Stevens as the scientist. John Carradine turns in another fine rendition of his suave Count Dracula, but Lon Chaney's werewolf is pretty much by the books at this point, although the end of the movie contains an interesting little twist for a change. Glenn Strange makes a very awesome-looking Frankenstein Monster, but unfortunately spends 99% of the film lying flat on his back with the exception of a few minor shots when he's up on his feet; some of his most active footage is swiped from BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN and GHOST OF FRANKENSTEIN.

All things considered you could undoubtedly do a lot worse than "House of Dracula" for a nightly Monster Mash, but it's easy to see why Dracula, the Wolf Man and Frankenstein's Monster were retired after this chapter, and why they needed Abbott & Costello to resuscitate them three years later. **1/2 out of ****


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

7 December 1945 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Wolf Man vs. Dracula See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Universal Pictures See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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