Architect Walter Craig senses impending doom as his half-remembered recurring dream turns into reality. The guests at the country house encourage him to stay as they take turns telling supernatural tales.

Directors:

Alberto Cavalcanti (as Cavalcanti), Charles Crichton | 2 more credits »

Writers:

John Baines (screenplay), Angus MacPhail (screenplay) (as Angus Macphail) | 5 more credits »
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1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Mervyn Johns ... Walter Craig (segment "Linking Story")
Roland Culver ... Eliot Foley (segment "Linking Story")
Mary Merrall ... Mrs. Foley (segment "Linking Story")
Googie Withers ... Joan Cortland (segment "Linking Story") / (segment "The Haunted Mirror")
Frederick Valk Frederick Valk ... Dr. Van Straaten (segment "Linking Story") / (segment "The Ventriloquist's Dummy")
Anthony Baird Anthony Baird ... Hugh Grainger (segment "Linking Story") / (segment "The Hearse Driver") (as Antony Baird)
Sally Ann Howes ... Sally O'Hara (segment "Linking Story") / (segment "Christmas Party")
Robert Wyndham Robert Wyndham ... Dr. Albury (segment "The Hearse Driver")
Judy Kelly ... Joyce Grainger (segment "Linking Story") / (segment "The Hearse Driver")
Miles Malleson ... Hearse Driver (segment "The Hearse Driver")
Michael Allan Michael Allan ... Jimmy Watson (segment "Christmas Story")
Barbara Leake ... Mrs. O'Hara (segment "Linking Story")
Ralph Michael Ralph Michael ... Peter Cortland (segment "The Haunted Mirror")
Esme Percy ... Antique Dealer (segment "The Haunted Mirror") (as Esmé Percy)
Basil Radford ... George Parratt (segment "Golfing Story")
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Storyline

Architect Walter Craig (Mervyn Johns), seeking the possibility of some work at a country farmhouse, soon finds himself once again stuck in his recurring nightmare. Dreading the end of the dream that he knows is coming, he must first listen to all the assembled guests' own bizarre tales. Written by Doug Sederberg <vornoff@sonic.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Even GREATER than "Seventh Veil"

Genres:

Drama | Horror

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Mervyn Johns (Walter Craig) and Miles Malleson (the hearse driver) also appeared in A Christmas Carol (1951), starring Alistair Sim. In that movie, Johns and Malleson played Bob Cratchit and Old Joe, respectively. See more »

Goofs

During the dummy sequence, when sitting and talking with Mr. Kee, the dummy's hand changes position from table to knee. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Eliot Foley: Ah! Walter Craig?
Walter Craig: How do you do? You're Eliot Foley.
Eliot Foley: That's right. So glad you were able to come, let's have your bag.
[takes Craig's bag]
Eliot Foley: We'll put the car away afterwards. You know it struck me after I'd telephoned you, rather a cheek on my part asking a busy architect like yourself to come down and spend the weekend with a set of complete strangers.
Walter Craig: Not a bit.
Eliot Foley: You see we're pretty cramped for space here, we need at least two more bedrooms.
Walter Craig: And with only one living room.
Eliot Foley: Yes, only one ...
[...]
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Alternate Versions

The UK release is 105 minutes long and features five stories (The Hearse Driver, The Christmas Party, The Haunted Mirror, The Golfing Story, and The Ventriloquist's Dummy). When originally released in the USA, two of the stories (The Christmas Party and The Golfing Story), were removed to shorten the film to 77-minutes. Later reissues and television version reinstated the missing segments. See more »

Connections

Featured in The 100 Greatest Scary Moments (2003) See more »

Soundtracks

Passing By
(Vous qui Passez sans me Voir)
Music by Johnny Hess and Paul Misraki
French lyrics by Charles Trenet
English lyrics by Jack Lawrence
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User Reviews

A prime example of a well-made horror-anthology
27 July 2006 | by Camera-ObscuraSee all my reviews

Anthology n.: a collection of selected literary pieces or passages of works of art or music.

This classic horror-anthology from Britain's Ealing Studios is composed of four separate stories, composed around a group of strangers that is mysteriously gathered at a country estate where each reveals their chilling tale of the supernatural. But even after these frightening tales are told, does one final nightmare await them all?

The horror-anthology has proved a difficult sub-genre, usually made with only limited success, because it's notoriously difficult to get it right. If only one of the stories fails to deliver, the whole piece is dragged down. But this multi-part horror effort from Britain's Ealing Studios still proves to be very effective and justifiably still is one of the most revered and successful horror anthologies ever made. It features appearances by many of the best British actors of it's day, including Mervyn Johns, Ralph Michael, Basil Radford and Michael Redgrave. With four different directors at the helm, not all four segments are equally effective and are quite different in tone, but they are all good in their own right. The standout for me, not judged in terms of the best, but certainly the most frightening story of the four, is "The Ventriloquist Dummy" by Brazilian born Alberto Cavalcanti (he's simply billed as Cavalcanti), the only non-British director involved in DEAD OF NIGHT. Michael Redgrave plays a renowned ventriloquist who descends into an abyss of madness and murder, when his dummy takes on a life of his own. One of the most unsettling stories I've ever seen.

The somewhat less effective (if only slightly) mirror sequence by Robert Hamer shows something very scary can be achieved with very basic means. When Ralph Michael looks in the mirror, to his horror he keeps seeing the reflection of a dark Gothic room lit with candles, completely different from the room he's standing in and slowly, he begins to loose his mind. Ultimately, it is the extremely unsettling music score that makes it work. Basic but very effective.

As with most anthologies, it's difficult to keep track of the main interwoven storyline, because between the different stories we're told, your mind is still very much trying to grasp what you've just seen. This is probably why the genre became increasingly unpopular over the years. With the exception of "The Ventriloquist Dummy", don't expect anything particularly scary, but it did leave me quietly disturbed. The peerless British cast and the witty, slightly old-fashioned tongue-in-cheek dialog makes this very pleasant and appropriately unsettling viewing.

Camera Obscura --- 8/10 --- 10/10 for "The Ventriloquist Dummy"


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

15 February 1946 (Finland) See more »

Also Known As:

Dead of Night See more »

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Box Office

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$1,919
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Company Credits

Production Co:

Ealing Studios See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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