7.5/10
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100 user 26 critic

Since You Went Away (1944)

Approved | | Drama, Romance, War | 20 July 1944 (USA)
With her husband away to fight in World War II, a housewife must care for their two daughters alone.

Directors:

John Cromwell, Edward F. Cline (uncredited) | 2 more credits »

Writers:

Margaret Buell Wilder (based on an adaptation of her book), David O. Selznick (screen play: by the producer)
Reviews
Won 1 Oscar. Another 8 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Claudette Colbert ... Anne Hilton
Jennifer Jones ... Jane Hilton
Joseph Cotten ... Lt. Tony Willett
Shirley Temple ... Brig Hilton
Monty Woolley ... Col. William G. Smollett
Lionel Barrymore ... Clergyman
Robert Walker ... Cpl. Bill Smollett 2nd
Hattie McDaniel ... Fidelia
Agnes Moorehead ... Emily Hawkins
Alla Nazimova ... Zofia Koslowska (as Nazimova)
Albert Bassermann ... Dr. Sigmund Gottlieb Golden
Gordon Oliver ... Marine Officer Seeking Room
Keenan Wynn ... Lt. Solomon
Guy Madison ... Hal Smith
Craig Stevens ... Danny Williams
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Storyline

While husband Tim is away during World War II, Anne Hilton copes with problems on the homefront. Taking in a lodger, Colonel Smollett, to help make ends meet and dealing with shortages and rationing are minor inconveniences compared to the love affair daughter Jane and the Colonel's grandson conduct. Written by Ron Kerrigan <mvg@whidbey.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

David O. Selznick's first production since "Gone With the Wind" and "Rebecca" See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance | War

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Claudette Colbert originally resisted taking the role of a fortyish mother of a teenager. However, Selznick's insistence that the film would help Wartime morale and a salary of $150,000 convinced the actress to do it. See more »

Goofs

Colonel William G. Smollett introduces himself as such when he responds to the advertisement for an officer boarder, but is called 'Colonel Smollie' by Bridget whilst tending the victory garden, and again at his birthday party with his cake having 'Colonel Smollie' written on it. Although Bridget and the other family members know his correct surname and, at the beginning, address him by it, they later, clearly address him as 'Smollie' as an affectionate family nickname. See more »

Quotes

Brig Hilton: You say it's animal?
Anne Hilton: That's right.
Jane Hilton: And its home is in the Middle West.
Anne Hilton: Umm-hmm.
Brig Hilton: And it makes a noise like a lion, but it puffs like a locomotive.
Anne Hilton: Umm-hmm. Better give up. You agreed if you hadn't guessed it by the time we got home.
Jane Hilton: Oh, I know. It's Soda.
Anne Hilton: Oh, no. Brig guessed that long ago.
Brig Hilton: All right. I give up.
Anne Hilton: It's Colonel Smollett, silly.
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Crazy Credits

The on-screen screenplay credit reads "Screen Play by the Producer." See more »

Alternate Versions

The DVD release from MGM restores the film's original entr'acte music, and uses a series of different still photos as the backdrop for both the overture and entr'acte. Previous video and laserdisc releases from CBS/Fox repeated the overture as the intermission music, and used the same still photo (the fireplace shown in the opening credits) for both overture and entr'acte. (In original theatrical showings overture and entr'acte music played over a black screen - the visual montages were added for the home video releases.) See more »

Connections

Referenced in Hollywood Hist-o-Rama: Claudette Colbert (1962) See more »

Soundtracks

You'll Never Know
(1943) (uncredited)
Music by Harry Warren
Lyrics by Mack Gordon
See more »

User Reviews

 
Personal Remarks
26 August 2004 | by harry-76See all my reviews

As I watched this recently on Turner Movie Classics, a number of trivial points ran through my mind. David O. Selznick certainly had a knack for making clear statements and making sure that everything in his productions (at least up to this time) was easily understood by viewers of all levels.

As his cinematographer, Lee Garmes, was noted for his tendency toward dark images, I was constantly aware of the many shadows in his shots. For his actors to move from one position to another they walk through at least one area of total darkness. There are many shadows on their faces, many profiles, and sharp light and dark contrasts in the background. While Selznick reportedly didn't appreciate Garmes' signature style for GWTW, David certainly tolerated it here, and this dark ambiance gave "Since You Went Away" a quality of depth and substance it might not otherwise have had.

David's effort to get the "perfect" cast paid off. With Colbert anchoring the enactment with a great performance, the film was also blessed with excellent work from Cotten, Jones, Temple, Wooley, McDaniel, Moorhead, et al.

It looks like Colbert's preference for being photographed from the left side is valid. On my system, motion can be stopped and slowly forwarded, observing her from the right side when she turns. In real time one only glimpses; in slow motion one can see her point.

Max Steiner's themes are quite haunting (one of his main ones reveals generic influences of the "Liebestod" from Tristan und Isolde--another the basis for a later Christmas song) and his careful underscoring of every action works well here. TMC Channel's inclusion of the complete Overture and Entr'acte enhances the presentation's effectiveness. It's a joy to see material once cut from so many "classics" now sensitively restored.

Knowing what the Walkers were going through in real life (marital separation) during this filming does indeed make me further appreciate the fine quality of their work. Though Jennifer reportedly often left the set in tears, not a hint of that shows. That indeed is strong acting.

The volume of sad and tragic events depicted in this film now seems, by the end, a wee bit much. Still, this "tear jerker supreme" continues to be enjoyed by many viewers, and "Since You Went Away," remains a nostalgic enactment of an emotional period in American history.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Yiddish

Release Date:

20 July 1944 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Since You Went Away See more »

Filming Locations:

Richmond, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$3,257,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(1949 re-release) | (DVD) | (copyright length)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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