7.5/10
21,059
175 user 110 critic

Meet Me in St. Louis (1944)

Passed | | Comedy, Drama, Family | January 1945 (USA)
Trailer
1:41 | Trailer
Young love and childish fears highlight a year in the life of a turn-of-the-century family.

Director:

Vincente Minnelli

Writers:

Irving Brecher (screen play), Fred F. Finklehoffe (screen play) | 1 more credit »
Nominated for 4 Oscars. Another 6 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Judy Garland ... Esther Smith
Margaret O'Brien ... 'Tootie' Smith
Mary Astor ... Mrs. Anna Smith
Lucille Bremer ... Rose Smith
Leon Ames ... Mr. Alonzo Smith
Tom Drake ... John Truett
Marjorie Main ... Katie (Maid)
Harry Davenport ... Grandpa
June Lockhart ... Lucille Ballard
Henry H. Daniels Jr. ... Lon Smith Jr.
Joan Carroll ... Agnes Smith
Hugh Marlowe ... Col. Darly
Robert Sully ... Warren Sheffield
Chill Wills ... Mr. Neely
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Storyline

St. Louis 1903. The well-off Smith family has four beautiful daughters, including Esther and little Tootie. 17-year old Esther has fallen in love with the boy next door who has just moved in, John. He however barely notices her at first. The family is shocked when Mr. Smith reveals that he has been transfered to a nice position in New York, which means that the family has to leave St. Louis and the St. Louis Fair. Written by Mattias Thuresson

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The "Trolley Song" Picture ! See more »


Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The entire cast and crew were immediately impressed with Vincente Minnelli's attention to detail in every shot. He had consulted author Sally Benson on how the interiors of the Smith home should look, and she had provided a wealth of firsthand information. As a result, the look of each set was near perfection according to the time period. According to Mary Astor, "The only anachronisms were the girls' long-swinging hairdos. Girls 'put their hair up' as soon as they got out of pigtails, the first instant they were allowed to by reluctant parents. It was a symbol, like the first long pants for boys." See more »

Goofs

When Esther and Tootie perform "Under the Bamboo Tree", Tootie's bedroom slippers are pink at the beginning of the number...but change to blue in the "cake walk" finale. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Mrs. Anna Smith: [tastes ketchup] Best ketchup we ever made, Katie.
Katie (Maid): [tastes ketchup] Too sweet.
Mrs. Anna Smith: Mr. Smith likes it all the sweet side.
Katie (Maid): All men like it on the sweet side. Too sweet, Mrs. Smith.
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Alternate Versions

A rare version, dubbed in Spanish, exists, which was issued on VHS in Spain several years ago. This version features the entire soundtrack dubbed, including the songs. In addition, several Halloween scenes involving Margaret O'Brien are deleted, immediately after "The Trolley Song." TNT, in Latin America, after a prologue talking about how this film was restored, presented it in its complete version but with the Spanish dubbed soundtrack lifted from that old version, which was not restored. For that reason, after "The Trolley Song" and during several minutes the films plays in English (after Judy Garland "sang" in Spanish) and then the audio reverts back to the dubbed version. Although that dubbed version was available in Spain, some people believe that it was actually produced in Mexico. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Tonight Show with Jay Leno: Episode #19.74 (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

You and I
(1944) (uncredited)
Music by Nacio Herb Brown
Lyrics by Arthur Freed
Played on piano by Mrs. Smith
Sung by Mary Astor and Leon Ames (dubbed by Arthur Freed and Denny Markas)
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User Reviews

 
Judy Garland never looked better
28 October 2000 | by k_jasmine_99See all my reviews

This is such a sweet, wonderful movie - a slice of 1900's America that probably was never so perfect, but we would like to think that it was. The storyline is not a love story between Esther (Garland) and "The Boy Next Door" (one of the three timeless classic songs found in this movie). The storyline is really about the whole Smith family, based on an actual family who lived in St. Louis at the turn of the century. The real-life "Tootie" Smith (played by Margaret O'Brien) wrote stories of her life for the NewYorker. These stories were bought and compiled into this classic musical.

"Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" originated here, and has become a classic yuletide song. It has been sung a thousand times by a thousand artists, but no one could ever capture the heartfelt emotion expressed by Judy Garland. If it doesn't bring a tear to your eye as you listen to her sing the song to little Tootie, I would have to wonder if you have a heart at all.

The most fun song is "The Trolley Song" - you can even see that Judy herself had a ball singing it. That scene was done in one take.

Judy Garland never looked better in any of her films as she did in this one. Perhaps it was one of the happiest times in her life? It is well-known that she married director Vincent Minelli after this picture.

Beautifully directed, depicting with accuracy the passing of the seasons of one year in the life of the Smiths of St. Louis. What a fun, charming, movie. I could never tire of it.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official Site

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

January 1945 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Meet Me in St. Louis See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,700,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$225,684, 8 December 2019

Gross USA:

$403,521

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$486,631
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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