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Meet Me in St. Louis (1944)

Not Rated | | Comedy, Drama, Family | January 1945 (USA)
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In the year leading up to the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair, the four Smith daughters learn lessons of life and love, even as they prepare for a reluctant move to New York.

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Writers:

(screen play), (screen play) | 1 more credit »
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Nominated for 4 Oscars. Another 6 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Lucille Ballard
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Storyline

St. Louis 1903. The well-off Smith family has four beautiful daughters, including Esther and little Tootie. 17-year old Esther has fallen in love with the boy next door who has just moved in, John. He however barely notices her at first. The family is shocked when Mr. Smith reveals that he has been transfered to a nice position in New York, which means that the family has to leave St. Louis and the St. Louis Fair. Written by Mattias Thuresson

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The "Trolley Song" Picture ! See more »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

January 1945 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Le chant du Missouri  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,707,561 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$7,566,000
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Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

According to Mary Astor, Margaret O'Brien liked to have fun with the prop master. For instance, when shooting a scene at the Smith family dinner table, all of the dishes and utensils had been laid out meticulously. "It was Maggie's favorite form of mischief, when his back was turned," said Astor, "to put things in disorder again, to reverse knives and forks, to put two napkin rings beside a plate. It would drive him nuts. And remember the strong caste system on the sets: she was a star and he was just a lowly property man, so all he could do was to smile and say, 'Please, Maggie dear!' when he'd have liked to have shaken her." See more »

Goofs

When Esther and her friends are boarding the trolley, someone says "The exposition doesn't open for six months." According to the title card, it is "Summer 1903". In the final scene, when the Smith family is going to the fair, the title card reads "Spring 1904", closer to 9 or 10 months later than summer 1903. See more »

Quotes

Katie the Maid: Anybody want dessert?
Mr. Alonzo Smith: Dessert? What happened to dinner?
Katie the Maid: I didn't think anybody could eat meat on a hot day like this!
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Soundtracks

Skip to My Lou
(1944)
Written by Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane
Sung by Judy Garland (uncredited), Lucille Bremer (uncredited), Henry H. Daniels Jr. (uncredited) & Ensemble
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
The Happiness of Not Moving--At Least for Now
21 December 2004 | by See all my reviews

One of the greatest movie musicals, and thus one of the greatest American movies, "Meet Me in St. Louis" tells a story that may appear insultingly inconsequential: a happy family living in turn-of-the-century St. Louis considers moving to New York, but decides against it. Yet Vincente Minelli, working with a wonderful cast and unusually intelligent songs, takes this story and makes it the one really convincing screen refutation of Tolstoy's claim that all happy families are alike, and indeed perhaps the only fully rounded and persuasive representation of a happy family in the history of movies. From the small family conflict over the quality of homemade ketchup that begins the movie, to the agony over moving at the end, the Smiths are a collection of distinctive, vibrant and at times almost incompatible characters bound together not only by love but by a contagious, and very particular, sense of fun.

Minelli's genius for musical numbers in interior spaces--most notably the great party in the Smith home near the beginning of the movie--is complemented here by two unforgettable outdoor sequences, Judy Garland's matchless "Trolley Song" and Tootie's Halloween adventure in the neighborhood, where she shows such vulnerability, such courage,and in the end such diabolical lack of conscience that no one can fail to love her. These outdoor scenes protect "Meet in St. Louis" from the claustrophobia that so frequently limits the power of "family" dramas.

Tootie, at five, is the youngest of the five Smith children, and as played by the great child actor Margaret O'Brien, she is also the center of most of the fun. Her relationship with her older sister Esther (Judy Garland) is captivating in its joy, complexity, and ultimately in its sadness. For even though the catastrophe (!) of moving to New York is narrowly avoided, Esther will still leave home for life with the boy next door, and the powerful unity of these lucky people will ultimately give way to other claims of new love, new suffering and new duty. The happiness the Smiths knew while living together will only increase the pain of each parting. We're blessed, though, to have glimpsed their particular brand of happiness at its glorious peak.


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