7.6/10
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155 user 101 critic

Meet Me in St. Louis (1944)

Not Rated | | Comedy, Drama, Family | January 1945 (USA)
Trailer
1:41 | Trailer

On Disc

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In the year leading up to the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair, the four Smith daughters learn lessons of life and love, even as they prepare for a reluctant move to New York.

Director:

Vincente Minnelli

Writers:

Irving Brecher (screen play), Fred F. Finklehoffe (screen play) | 1 more credit »
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Nominated for 4 Oscars. Another 6 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Judy Garland ... Esther Smith
Margaret O'Brien ... 'Tootie' Smith
Mary Astor ... Mrs. Anna Smith
Lucille Bremer ... Rose Smith
Leon Ames ... Mr. Alonzo Smith
Tom Drake ... John Truett
Marjorie Main ... Katie (Maid)
Harry Davenport ... Grandpa
June Lockhart ... Lucille Ballard
Henry H. Daniels Jr. ... Lon Smith Jr.
Joan Carroll ... Agnes Smith
Hugh Marlowe ... Colonel Darly
Robert Sully ... Warren Sheffield
Chill Wills ... Mr. Neely
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Storyline

St. Louis 1903. The well-off Smith family has four beautiful daughters, including Esther and little Tootie. 17-year old Esther has fallen in love with the boy next door who has just moved in, John. He however barely notices her at first. The family is shocked when Mr. Smith reveals that he has been transfered to a nice position in New York, which means that the family has to leave St. Louis and the St. Louis Fair. Written by Mattias Thuresson

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A cast of favorites in the Charming . . . Romantic . . . Tuneful Love Story of the Early 1900s ! See more »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

January 1945 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Meet Me in St. Louis See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,707,561 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$7,566,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

A former child star herself, Judy Garland couldn't help but be concerned about young Margaret O'Brien. Garland was worried that O'Brien was being overworked and was missing out on her childhood. However, O'Brien herself said in a 2004 interview that while she appreciated Garland's concern, this was not the case. O'Brien loved her time acting, and the child labor laws had been strengthened in the time since Garland had been an underage star. "Tootie was fun because I could do a lot of the things I maybe wouldn't normally do myself," said O'Brien, "and she was really kind of bratty and mischievous, so I loved playing Tootie." See more »

Goofs

When one of the girls in Esther's group of friends going to the Fairgrounds in the first act of the film says the site must look like a fairy land, one of the boys tells her the fair won't open for six months. This scene took place in the "Summer 1903" act of the film and before the "Autumn 1903" act. The Louisiana Purchase Exposition opened in St. Louis in April of 1904. If the fair wouldn't open for six months, the excursion of Esther's friends to the fairgrounds should place the date of that scene sometime in November of 1903. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Mrs. Anna Smith: Best ketchup we ever made, Katie.
[she tries to tasting ketchup, it is too sweet]
Katie (Maid): Too sweet.
Mrs. Anna Smith: Mr. Smith likes it all the sweet side.
Katie (Maid): All men like it on the sweet side. Too sweet, Mrs. Smith.
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Alternate Versions

A rare version, dubbed in Spanish, exists, which was issued on VHS in Spain several years ago. This version features the entire soundtrack dubbed, including the songs, and several scenes deleted involving Margaret O'Brien deleted, dealing with Halloween, immediately after "The trolley song". TNT, in Latin America, after prologue dealing about how this film was restored presented it in its complete version but with the Spanish dubbed soundtrack lifted from that old version, which was not restored. For that reason, after "The trolley song" and during several minutes the films plays in English (after Judy Garland "sung" in Spanish) and then the audio reverts back to the dubbed version. Although that dubbed version was available in Spain, some people believe that it was actually produced in Mexico. See more »

Connections

Featured in The Wizard of Lies (2017) See more »

Soundtracks

You and I
(1944) (uncredited)
Music by Nacio Herb Brown
Lyrics by Arthur Freed
Played on piano by Mrs. Smith
Sung by Mary Astor and Leon Ames (dubbed by Arthur Freed and Denny Markas)
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
The Happiness of Not Moving--At Least for Now
21 December 2004 | by loken-1See all my reviews

One of the greatest movie musicals, and thus one of the greatest American movies, "Meet Me in St. Louis" tells a story that may appear insultingly inconsequential: a happy family living in turn-of-the-century St. Louis considers moving to New York, but decides against it. Yet Vincente Minelli, working with a wonderful cast and unusually intelligent songs, takes this story and makes it the one really convincing screen refutation of Tolstoy's claim that all happy families are alike, and indeed perhaps the only fully rounded and persuasive representation of a happy family in the history of movies. From the small family conflict over the quality of homemade ketchup that begins the movie, to the agony over moving at the end, the Smiths are a collection of distinctive, vibrant and at times almost incompatible characters bound together not only by love but by a contagious, and very particular, sense of fun.

Minelli's genius for musical numbers in interior spaces--most notably the great party in the Smith home near the beginning of the movie--is complemented here by two unforgettable outdoor sequences, Judy Garland's matchless "Trolley Song" and Tootie's Halloween adventure in the neighborhood, where she shows such vulnerability, such courage,and in the end such diabolical lack of conscience that no one can fail to love her. These outdoor scenes protect "Meet in St. Louis" from the claustrophobia that so frequently limits the power of "family" dramas.

Tootie, at five, is the youngest of the five Smith children, and as played by the great child actor Margaret O'Brien, she is also the center of most of the fun. Her relationship with her older sister Esther (Judy Garland) is captivating in its joy, complexity, and ultimately in its sadness. For even though the catastrophe (!) of moving to New York is narrowly avoided, Esther will still leave home for life with the boy next door, and the powerful unity of these lucky people will ultimately give way to other claims of new love, new suffering and new duty. The happiness the Smiths knew while living together will only increase the pain of each parting. We're blessed, though, to have glimpsed their particular brand of happiness at its glorious peak.


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