7.0/10
10,307
79 user 38 critic

Going My Way (1944)

Passed | | Comedy, Drama, Music | 2 October 1944 (Brazil)
Trailer
2:20 | Trailer
When young Father O'Malley arrives at St. Dominic's, old Father Fitzgibbon doesn't think much of the church's newest member.

Director:

Leo McCarey

Writers:

Frank Butler (screenplay), Frank Cavett (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
Won 7 Oscars. Another 11 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Bing Crosby ... Father Chuck O'Malley
Barry Fitzgerald ... Father Fitzgibbon
Frank McHugh ... Father Timothy O'Dowd
James Brown ... Ted Haines Jr.
Gene Lockhart ... Ted Haines Sr.
Jean Heather ... Carol James
Porter Hall ... Mr. Belknap
Fortunio Bonanova ... Tomaso Bozanni
Eily Malyon ... Mrs. Carmody
The Robert Mitchell Boy Choir The Robert Mitchell Boy Choir ... Choir (as Robert Mitchell Boychoir)
Risë Stevens ... Genevieve Linden
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Storyline

Youthful Father Chuck O'Malley led a colorful life of sports, song, and romance before joining the Roman Catholic clergy, but his level gaze and twinkling eyes make it clear that he knows he made the right choice. After joining a parish, O'Malley's worldly knowledge helps him connect with a gang of kids looking for direction and handle the business details of the church-building fund, winning over his aging, conventional superior, Father Fitzgibbon. Written by alfiehitchie

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Bing's "little angels" - the roughest gang this side of reform school ! See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Music

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

One of over 700 Paramount Productions, filmed between 1929 and 1949, which were sold to MCA/Universal in 1958 for television distribution, and have been owned and controlled by Universal ever since. Considered one of the centerpieces of the MCA/Paramount Film Library, it was initially telecast in Omaha Tuesday 11 November 1958 on KETV (Channel 7); it next launched the Paramount Collection in Minneapolis Monday 5 January 1959 on WTCN (Channel 11); its next telecasts took place in Toledo 7 January 1959 on WTOL (Channel 11), and simultaneously Saturday 10 January 1959 in Los Angeles on KNXT (Channel 2), in Philadelphia on WCAU (Channel 10), in St. Louis on KMOX (Channel 4) and in Chicago on WBBM (Channel 2); its television premiere in New York City took place Sunday 25 January 1959 on WCBS (Channel 2) and in Asheville, North Carolina Sunday 22 March 1959 on WLOS (Channel 13), launching the MCA/Paramount Library on those cities also. In Milwaukee it was first telecast 10 April 1959 on WITI (Channel 6), in Phoenix 11 June 1959 on KVAR (Channel 12), in Grand Rapids 6 August 1959 on WOOD (Channel 8), in Detroit 23 September 1959 on WJBK (Channel 2) and in Seattle 6 November 1959 on KIRO (Channel 7); on Thanksgiving Day, Thursday 26 November 1959, it enjoyed its initial airing in both Pittsburgh on KDKA (Channel 2) and in San Francisco on KPIX (Channel 5). In Johnstown it first aired 22 December 1959 on WJAC (Channel 6). Universal first released this one on DVD 2 November 1999 in tandem with Holiday Inn (1942), again, as a single, 6 February 2007, and again 11 November 2014 as one of 24 titles in Universal's Bing Crosby Silver Screen Collection. Since that time, it's also received an occasional airing on Turner Classic Movies. See more »

Goofs

When Father O'Malley is talking to Jenny while she is getting ready to perform, the conductor can be seen taking out his cigarette case and opening it twice, in two adjacent shots. See more »

Quotes

Father Fitzgibbons: I gave them both my blessing.
Father Chuck O'Malley: And they gave you the bird.
Father Fitzgibbons: Yeah.
See more »

Alternate Versions

Since Paramount could not get the European copyright clearance for Bizet's "Carmen," an additional sequence was shot from Smetana's "The Bartered Bride" which replaced Carmen for foreign prints. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Screen Director (1951) See more »

Soundtracks

Ave Maria (Op.52 No.1)
(1825) (uncredited)
Written by Franz Schubert
Performed by Bing Crosby and Risë Stevens with The Robert Mitchell Boy Choir
See more »

User Reviews

 
A movie that really sneaks up on you
27 August 2002 | by scgary66See all my reviews

It's an easily underrated movie, particularly because it flatly refuses to do most of the things that people expect movies to do today; there's a defiant unwillingness to slip into easy melodrama (though I often like melodrama), or to spend too much time on comedy, etc. The movie won't pigeonhole itself, and I think this leads to its secret - at heart, it really intends to be about what it's like to be a priest. You CAN'T pigeonhole yourself in that role, because you can't possibly know what's coming up, or really keep perfect track of all the different threads of a community at the same time. You have to take things as they come, and this movie really does that all the way through.

And there's also a sense of the wistfulness that comes from giving up that "plot-driven" style of living - in the scenes where Crosby visits his old girlfriend, there's a tangible awareness on both sides that they don't really know what happened to the "plot" of their relationship - they just took things as they came, and it really turned out OK for both of them. Most of the movie's separate narrative threads are left off, and returned to, almost at random - and the main focus on the relationships between the characters is what ends up shining through as intended.

A lot of the film is spent on scenes that seem kind of inconsequential at the time (like most of everyday life), but they invariably lead to a payoff later in the film. There's a shot of Gene Lockhart watching his son leave - a silent shot that just holds on a medium shot of the father, watching his expression for about 10 seconds - that I found absolutely sublime in its effectiveness. To me, that single shot justifies the half dozen scenes that led to it. Ultimately, the movie is almost happy to laugh at the audience for being so eager to expect more of a story. As one character aptly says,"Schmaltz is in this year"; the people behind this movie KNOW that a lot of people will want to dismiss it, but won't let them off the hook so easily. It's looks deceptively simple to make a film this easygoing and yet moving. (Capra tried it later in his career, sometimes with Crosby, and yet he couldn't pull it off.)

The Oscar win is OK, though I think Double Indemnity should have won, and I also like The Miracle of Morgan's Creek a lot more as well (THE SPOTS!!!); but Going My Way belonged in the top 5 that year, along with Laura and I'm-not-sure-what-else. (Gaslight, maybe?) And I'll note that I do like the "sequel," The Bells of St. Mary's (actually written first), a little better, too.

But as I wrote in the summary, this one really sneaks up on you; the last scenes prove much more moving than you expect, and the ending of the film - while initially seeming abrupt - leaves you suddenly saying, "Of course - it's perfect." Just moving on.......

9 of 10

P.S. Is it really set in New York? That's never said, and there's so much talk of St. Louis that I think that more accurate a guess. The "Metropolitan Opera House" is mentioned, but that's a generic-sounding name. Honestly, I think they went to great effort to make it as unrooted in a single locale as possible.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

2 October 1944 (Brazil) See more »

Also Known As:

Going My Way See more »

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$16,300,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Paramount Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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