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William Wyler movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Best Years of Our Lives,’ ‘Ben-Hur,’ ‘Funny Girl’

  • Gold Derby
William Wyler movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Best Years of Our Lives,’ ‘Ben-Hur,’ ‘Funny Girl’
William Wyler would’ve celebrated his 117th birthday on July 1, 2019. The three-time Oscar winner crafted several classics during Hollywood’s Golden Age, adapting his style to a wide variety of genres. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 20 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1902 in Germany, Wyler immigrated to the U.S. when his cousin, Universal Studios chief Carl Laemmle, hired him as an errand boy. He quickly moved up the ranks, directing shorts during the silent era before transitioning into features. It was with the advent of sound that he hit his stride, displaying an ear for dialogue that would serve him well in lofty literary adaptations produced by his longtime partner, independent mogul Samuel Goldwyn.

SEEBette Davis movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

Wyler quickly became an Oscar mainstay, earning a record-breaking 12 nominations for Best Director: “Dodsworth
See full article at Gold Derby »

William Wyler movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
William Wyler movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best
William Wyler would’ve celebrated his 117th birthday on July 1, 2019. The three-time Oscar winner crafted several classics during Hollywood’s Golden Age, adapting his style to a wide variety of genres. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 20 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1902 in Germany, Wyler immigrated to the U.S. when his cousin, Universal Studios chief Carl Laemmle, hired him as an errand boy. He quickly moved up the ranks, directing shorts during the silent era before transitioning into features. It was with the advent of sound that he hit his stride, displaying an ear for dialogue that would serve him well in lofty literary adaptations produced by his longtime partner, independent mogul Samuel Goldwyn.

Wyler quickly became an Oscar mainstay, earning a record-breaking 12 nominations for Best Director: “Dodsworth” (1936), “Wuthering Heights” (1939), “The Letter” (1940), “The Little Foxes” (1941), “Mrs. Miniver” (1942), “The Best Years of Our Lives
See full article at Gold Derby »

Lotus Production Blossoms Under Leone Film Group Partnership

  • Variety
In a key step in its ongoing expansion Leone Film Group in 2014 partnered with young producer Marco Belardi and bought his small but commercially flourishing Lotus Production shingle, which has since become a bigger affair.

Raffaella Leone says while Lfg was being floated on the Milan bourse she knew they “had to guarantee content” to investors beyond titles available in Hollywood and on the international market at large. She also knew it was tough to build a production company from scratch, since “production was not our specific know-how.”

So Raffaella and Andrea zeroed in on Lotus, which in 10 years of activity had forged exclusive relationships with up-and-coming Italian directors such as Paolo Genovese, now known for 2016 megahit “Perfect Strangers.” After a few meetings, Belardi and the Leones struck up “a good personal feeling,” she says. And from there sprung a “fortunate match.”

Belardi recalls he was a bit taken aback
See full article at Variety »

‘Special’ Creator Ryan O’Connell Is Changing Hollywood, Just Don’t Ask Him if He’s ‘Ok’ (Video)

One of Ryan O’Connell’s biggest pet peeves is when strangers on the street stop to ask him if he’s “Ok.”

But O’Connell, a gay man with cerebral palsy, knows how he’ll answer that question once his Netflix comedy “Special,” which he writes, executive produces and stars in, drops on Friday.

“I can’t wait to point to my billboard right now and say, ‘I’m just fine,'” he told TheWrap.

Also Read: 'Special' Star Ryan O'Connell Exclusive StudioWrap Portraits (Photos)

The show, co-produced by “Big Bang Theory” star Jim Parsons, centers around what is essentially a younger and more sheltered version of O’Connell, Ryan Kayes — an aspiring writer who still lives with his overprotective mother (Jessica Hecht) and starts an unpaid internship at a new-age confessional blog called “Eggwoke.”

“Ryan kind of has the coming of age journey at 28-years-old,” O’Connell said.
See full article at The Wrap »

The Classic Hollywood Touches in ‘Dumbo’, From ‘The Greatest Show on Earth’ to ‘The Best Years of Our Lives’

(Welcome to Classically Contemporary, a series where we explore the ways in which new releases echo classic Hollywood or how classic Hollywood continues to influence modern filmmaking.) In 1941, in the midst of World War II, the Walt Disney Studios put out a movie about a little elephant with big ears. Dumbo was the savior of […]

The post The Classic Hollywood Touches in ‘Dumbo’, From ‘The Greatest Show on Earth’ to ‘The Best Years of Our Lives’ appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

NYC Weekend Watch: ‘The Best Years of Our Lives,’ ‘Rio Bravo,’ ‘Zabriskie Point’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of the Moving Image

William Wyler’s The Best Years of Our Lives plays this Sunday with a conversation to follow.

Wings of Desire screens again on Sunday.

La meilleur cochon, Miss Piggy, gets her highlight reel on Saturday.

Metrograph

Hopefully with a shower close at hand, the Harmony Korine retrospective commences.

Kent Jones
See full article at The Film Stage »

Alfonso Cuaron becomes 92nd Best Director winner, joining Guillermo Del Toro, Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg and…

Alfonso Cuaron becomes 92nd Best Director winner, joining Guillermo Del Toro, Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg and…
Alfonso Cuaron just added another Best Director Oscar to his shelf with his victory for “Roma,” a personal story about growing up in Mexico City in the 1970s. The win came just five years after his first one for “Gravity” (2013). He became the 92nd person in history to clinch that prize, beating out Yorgos Lanthimos (“The Favourite”), Spike Lee (“BlacKkKlansman”), Adam McKay (“Vice”), and Pawel Pawlikowski (“Cold War”). Tour our photo gallery above of every Academy Award winner for Best Director, from the most recent winner to the very first one.

SEE2019 Oscars: Full list of winners (and losers) at the 91st Academy Awards

At the first Academy Awards ceremony in 1927, two awards were given for directing: one for comedy (Lewis Milestone for “Two Arabian Nights”), the other for drama (Frank Borzage for “7th Heaven”). The next year, only one prize was given.

Since 1927, only 21 directors have won this category more than once.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Rami Malek (‘Bohemian Rhapsody’) becomes 92nd Best Actor winning, joining Gary Oldman, Daniel Day-Lewis, Denzel Washington and…

Rami Malek (‘Bohemian Rhapsody’) becomes 92nd Best Actor winning, joining Gary Oldman, Daniel Day-Lewis, Denzel Washington and…
Rami Malek just won the Oscar as Best Actor for his transformative performance as Freddie Mercury in “Bohemian Rhapsody.” He become the 92nd person in history to clinch that prize, beating out Christian Bale (“Vice”), Bradley Cooper (“A Star is Born”), Willem Dafoe (“At Eternity’s Gate”) and Viggo Mortensen (“Green Book”). Tour our photo gallery above of every Academy Award winner for Best Actor, from the most recent winner to the very first one. And find out when there was a tie in the 91-year history of this Oscar.

SEE2019 Oscars: Full list of winners (and losers) at the 91st Academy Awards

Since 1927, only nine actors have won this category more than once. Daniel Day-Lewis holds the record for most victories with three: “My Left Foot” (1989), “There Will Be Blood” (2007), and “Lincoln” (2012). Eight other actors have received two Best Actor trophies:

Marlon Brando: “On the Waterfront” (1954) and “The Godfather
See full article at Gold Derby »

How many times have Best Supporting Actor and Best Actor gone to the same film at the Oscars?

How many times have Best Supporting Actor and Best Actor gone to the same film at the Oscars?
Three films in contention at this year’s Oscars earned nominations for both Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor: “Green Book,” “A Star is Born” and “Vice.” How likely is it that both these men will win Academy Awards on Feb. 24? In the 82 years since the supporting awards were introduced at the 9th Oscars, only five films could boast victories in both these races.

For such a male-dominated industry, it is surprising that these two acting categories are the least successful pairing at the Oscars while the two female ones are the most. Then again, the film industry has no shortage of roles for men (lead or supporting) so they have been able to spread the love across different male performers in different films. There has always been (and still is) a shortage of female roles, so there have been and are fewer films with such notable performances, be they lead or supporting.
See full article at Gold Derby »

What Netflix Backlash? The 2019 Oscar Nominations Snubs and Surprises

Among the biggest surprises of the 2019 Oscar race: There’s no such thing as a Netflix backlash. Not only did the most dominant force in Hollywood land 15 Oscar nominations, including “Roma” (10) and three surprise craft nods for the Coen brothers’ “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs,” but “Roma” is a historic achievement. It’s the 10th foreign-language nominee that also contends for Best Picture, tying Ang Lee’s “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” (2000) for the most nominations earned by a foreign-language film.

Alfonso Cuarón also became the first filmmaker in Oscar history to land nominations for Picture, Director, and Cinematography. “Roma” is the fifth film to be nominated for Foreign Language Film and Best Picture in the same year. Each of the previous four — “Z” (1969), “Life Is Beautiful” (1998), “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” (2000) and “Amour” (2012) — won for Foreign Language Film, but not Best Picture. If “Roma” wins Best Picture, it will be a
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

What Netflix Backlash? The 2019 Oscar Nominations Snubs and Surprises

Among the biggest surprises of the 2019 Oscar race: There’s no such thing as a Netflix backlash. Not only did the most dominant force in Hollywood land 15 Oscar nominations, including “Roma” (10) and three surprise craft nods for the Coen brothers’ “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs,” but “Roma” is a historic achievement. It’s the 10th foreign-language nominee that also contends for Best Picture, tying Ang Lee’s “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” (2000) for the most nominations earned by a foreign-language film.

Alfonso Cuarón also became the first filmmaker in Oscar history to land nominations for Picture, Director, and Cinematography. “Roma” is the fifth film to be nominated for Foreign Language Film and Best Picture in the same year. Each of the previous four — “Z” (1969), “Life Is Beautiful” (1998), “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” (2000) and “Amour” (2012) — won for Foreign Language Film, but not Best Picture. If “Roma” wins Best Picture, it will be a
See full article at Indiewire »

The Oscars and the Golden Globes agree to disagree over the past 75 years

Are “Green Room” and “Bohemian Rhapsody” Best Picture Oscar favorites because they won the Golden Globes’ top prizes? Maybe.

Or maybe not.

Though the Globes have been considered a leading bellwether for the Academy Awards, the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences have agreed to disagree numerous times in major categories over the past 75 years.

In fact, the very first Golden Globes ceremony selected the religious drama “The Song of Bernadette” as the best film of 1943, while the Oscar for best picture went to the beloved “Casablanca.”

Even last year, Guillermo del Toro’s romantic fantasy “The Shape of Water” won four Oscars including best film and director. But the Globes chose “Lady Bird” for best picture musical or comedy and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” won best drama. Del Toro did win the Globe for director.

Checking out Golden Globes best drama winners for the past decade,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Was 1939 really the best year in movie history?

A clutch of film buffs and staff writers at my favorite newspaper, the Washington Post, devoted considerable time, thought and space to a weekend article challenging 1939’s claim to the title of “Best Movie Year Ever.” Prompted by the number of critics appending “great” to 2018, the Post decided to look back and single out the greatest years in film, and after a brainstorming session, its writers settled on 1939 and six subsequent years — 1946, 1955, 1974, 1982, 1999, and 2007 — and assigned a sponsor to each one.

It was a cute idea and a fool’s errand if anyone’s ever been sent on one. It also produced fun reading, even if 1939 need not worry about its place in film history. There were unique reasons for 1939 (and ‘40 and ‘41) turning out so many enduring movies.

Hollywood had been recently and grudgingly unionized, giving directors in particular more power over their studio assignments. The country was in a dark mood,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Bridging the gap by Anne-Katrin Titze

Paul Auster on who was originally cast in the role Willem Dafoe plays in Lulu On The Bridge: "I had wanted Salman Rushdie to play the part."

Paul Auster's journey with putting together the production of his solo directorial début Lulu On The Bridge, was a challenging one for him and his producers Peter Newman and Greg Johnson. The film stars Harvey Keitel, Mira Sorvino and Willem Dafoe with Gina Gershon, Mandy Patinkin, Vanessa Redgrave, Richard Edson, Don Byron, Victor Argo, Kevin Corrigan, Sophie Auster, Lou Reed and David Byrne.

At Eternity's Gate with Louise Kugelberg, Jean-Claude Carrière, Julian Schnabel, Willem Dafoe, Oscar Isaac, and Rupert Friend at the 56th New York Film Festival Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

In the second instalment of my conversation with Paul Auster on his film career, we discuss the pitfalls that had to be overcome, the reaction to casting Salman Rushdie, Golden Globe nominee
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

‘A Star Is Born’ has the best chance of snagging both male acting Oscars, readers say

‘A Star Is Born’ has the best chance of snagging both male acting Oscars, readers say
Are both Maine brothers going to be Oscar winners? That’s what our readers think: 46 percent believe “A Star Is Born” has the best shot of becoming the sixth film to sweep the male acting Oscars.

This result is not that surprising since a majority of our users also think “A Star Is Born” will be just the third film to win three acting Oscars for leads Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga, and supporting player Sam Elliott. Currently, Cooper is in first place in our Best Actor odds, while Elliott is in third in our Best Supporting Actor predictions.

A Best Actor victory is entirely feasible for Cooper, a three-time acting nominee who could rack up four nominations this year for “A Star Is Born,” Best Picture, Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay being the others. Elliott might have a tougher time with limited screen time as Jackson’s (Cooper
See full article at Gold Derby »

Will ‘A Star Is Born,’ ‘Green Book’ or ‘Vice’ be the 6th film to sweep the male acting Oscars?

Will ‘A Star Is Born,’ ‘Green Book’ or ‘Vice’ be the 6th film to sweep the male acting Oscars?
Our predicted Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor Oscar nominee lineups cover 10 people (obviously), but only across seven films. Three films — “A Star Is Born,” “Green Book” and “Vice” — are expected to nab nominations in both categories, and wins for any of the pairs of co-stars would put their picture in elite company.

Only five films have won both male acting categories:

1. “Going My Way” (1944): Best Actor for Bing Crosby, Best Supporting Actor for Barry Fitzgerald

2. “The Best Years of Our Lives” (1946): Best Actor for Fredric March, Best Supporting Actor for Harold Russell

3. “Ben-Hur” (1959): Best Actor for Charlton Heston, Best Supporting Actor for Hugh Griffith

4. “Mystic River” (2003): Best Actor for Sean Penn, Best Supporting Actor for Tim Robbins

5. “Dallas Buyers Club” (2013): Best Actor for Matthew McConaughey, Best Supporting Actor for Jared Leto

See Can Bradley Cooper (‘A Star Is Born’) become the latest actor to
See full article at Gold Derby »

Happy Teresa Wright Centennial

The Oscar-winning actress of Mrs Miniver fame, was born 100 years ago on this very day in Harlem, where I'm typing this from. 

a lesser known distinction: she was Marlon Brando's very first romantic interest in a filmShe didn't consider herself a glamour girl, which could account for the sparcity of glamorous photoshoots compared to other 'it girls'. Wright's screen heyday was short-lived as many careers are when the success is so instantaneous and large. Still, it's hard to knock the girl next door beauty  for not being able to live up to her first two years in Hollywood. Her first three movies all brought her Oscar nominations. An Oscar winner by the age of 24 with batting a thousand record there was essentially nowhere to go but down. Still, before the inevitable fade of her career she managed two more all time classics, doing her best acting for Alfred Hitchcock
See full article at FilmExperience »

Brockhampton Play Visceral ‘District’ on ‘Fallon’

Brockhampton performed a visceral, dizzying version of “District” on Tuesday’s Tonight Show. The alternative hip-hop collective, who recruited a live string quartet and crew of backing vocalists, alternated between punk screams and soothing auto-tuned crooning.

The self-described “boy band” raged across the stage as red and white lights flickered wildly – even venturing into the audience during the “praise God, hallelujah” section.

“District” appears on Brockhampton’s recently issued fourth LP, Iridescence, their first Number One entry on the Billboard 200. The album, which also features “San Marcos” and “New Orleans,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

The Collector

The Collector

Blu ray – All Region

Indicator/Powerhouse

1965/ 1.85:1 / Street Date September 24, 2018

Starring Terence Stamp, Samantha Eggar

Cinematography by Robert Surtees, Robert Krasker

Directed by William Wyler

German-born William Wyler was a storyteller who asked the audience not to understand him too quickly. A notorious perfectionist, he was a masterful old-school director of enduring entertainments distinguished by thoughtfulness and, a rare trait for the times, ambiguity.

At their best, Wyler’s films were acutely observed slices of American life, particularly concerning its ongoing civil wars – Davis treading on Southern decorum in Jezebel, Dana Andrew’s bitter post-war abasement in The Best Years of Our Lives and the deal-breaking social gulf between the would-be lovers of Roman Holiday. In The Collector, those class conflicts get the horror movie treatment.

Frederick Clegg, the gaunt loner lurking at the edges of Wyler’s psycho-thriller, is the very model of the modern Incel. Emotionally
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Watch Brockhampton Perform in Audience for Fervent ‘New Orleans’ Video

Brockhampton have unveiled their new video for “New Orleans.” The song is the first track on their newly released Iridescence LP.

Similar to their previously released “San Marcos” video, fans are featured in the new visual, but this time the members of the group are performing live in the video, which was directed by de facto leader Kevin Abstract. Fans surround members and sing-along as group members move down the aisles of a venue while performing the track with the fervent hook of “Tell ’em boys, don’t run from
See full article at Rolling Stone »
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