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Gaslight (1944)

Not Rated | | Crime, Drama, Mystery | 30 October 1944 (Sweden)
Trailer
1:54 | Trailer
Years after her aunt was murdered in her home, a young woman moves back into the house with her new husband. However, he has a secret that he will do anything to protect, even if it means driving his wife insane.

Director:

George Cukor

Writers:

John Van Druten (screenplay), Walter Reisch (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
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Popularity
4,160 ( 874)
Won 2 Oscars. Another 4 wins & 7 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Charles Boyer ... Gregory Anton
Ingrid Bergman ... Paula Alquist
Joseph Cotten ... Brian Cameron
May Whitty ... Miss Thwaites (as Dame May Whitty)
Angela Lansbury ... Nancy
Barbara Everest ... Elizabeth
Emil Rameau Emil Rameau ... Maestro Guardi
Edmund Breon ... General Huddleston
Halliwell Hobbes ... Mr. Muffin
Tom Stevenson Tom Stevenson ... Williams
Heather Thatcher ... Lady Dalroy
Lawrence Grossmith Lawrence Grossmith ... Lord Dalroy
Jakob Gimpel Jakob Gimpel ... Pianist
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Storyline

After the death of her famous opera-singing aunt, Paula Alquist (Ingrid Bergman) is sent to study in Italy to become a great opera singer as well. While there, she falls in love with the charming Gregory Anton (Charles Boyer). The two return to London, and Paula begins to notice strange goings-on: missing pictures, strange footsteps in the night, and gaslights that dim without being touched. As she fights to retain her sanity, her new husband's intentions come into question. Written by Jwelch5742

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Strange drama of a captive sweetheart! See more »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Industry rumors pegged Greer Garson as Ingrid Bergman's replacement if she had been unable to be loaned out for this movie. See more »

Goofs

When Paula finds the letter in her aunt's music score, Gregory crumples up the letter and jams it into his pocket. Later, when she finds the letter in Gregory's desk, it's neatly folded, with no evidence of crumpling. See more »

Quotes

Gregory Anton: For the last time, what do you want of me?
Brian Cameron: The jewels - and justice. How does it feel, Bauer, to have planned and killed and tortured for something and then to know it's been for nothing?
Gregory Anton: For nothing?
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Crazy Credits

The opening and closing credits are displayed over a background of a burning gaslight. If you look at the shadow on the wallpaper, you see a man strangling a woman. See more »

Alternate Versions

Exists in a computer-colorized version. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Private Practice: Best Laid Plans (2010) See more »

Soundtracks

Ballade No. 1 in G minor, Op. 23
(1835-36) (uncredited)
Music by Frédéric Chopin
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User Reviews

 
Foggy nights in London's Thornton Square
22 May 2005 | by jotix100See all my reviews

Patrick Hamilton's "Angel Street", an American stage classic, was turned into "Gaslight" in 1944. This atmospheric account about a woman being driven out of her mind, was directed by George Cukor. The film has always been a favorite of classic movie fans all over the world because it holds the viewer interested in watching the psychological drama with echoes of Gothic overtones, unfold on the screen.

This was not the first adaptation of Mr. Hamilton's play, although in our humble opinion, it is much better than the previous account, in part helped by the great cast that Mr. Cukor assembled to portray these characters. Thanks to the magnificent black and white cinematography by Joseph Ruttengerg and the musical score by Bronislau Kaper, the film ultimately rewards the viewer.

We are taken to No. 9 Thornton Square, at the start of the film. A murder of a famous opera singer has been committed. We watch as a young woman is taken away. Paula, is being sent away to Italy to recuperate from the tragedy she has just witnessed. The idea was for her to follow her aunt, the murdered diva's footsteps, but just listening to the young woman sing, one realizes opera is not going to gain a new star.

The young pianist, Greorgy Anton, who is seen at Maestro Gardi's home, seems to be in love with Paula; she, in turn, has fallen in love with this much older figure. They prepare to return to London and live in the house at Thornton Square. Paula, alas, is not too happy because of her traumatic experience there. Little by little we watch as Gregory, now in charge of the household, begins to terrorize his wife. The key seems to be hidden in the attic where all the things that belonged to the late diva has been stored.

A young man living near the Antons, Brian Cameron, takes an interest in what he sees is definitively wrong with the woman at No. 9, and takes things into his own hands. It's through this man's intervention that Paula is able to see all that has been inflicted upon her. Whatever Gregory has done, succeeded in giving Paula a deep sense of insecurity and fear.

Ingrid Bergman, who makes a magnificent Paula, was born to play this troubled woman. She is seen as a young girl at the beginning of the film, then as a blossoming beautiful woman and at the end she is transformed into a person afraid of her own shadow. One look into Ms. Bergman's eyes and we know what's going on in her mind. She conveys all the emotions convincingly. There's not a thing wrong with her performance.

Charles Boyer also makes a great Gregory Anton, a man who is duplicitous and sly, with a hidden agenda to get whatever he can out of poor Paula. Gregory is an evil man who will go to great lengths to get what he wants. Gregory Anton offered the actor one of his best characters. His chemistry with Ms. Bergman is wonderful.

The other supporting characters are well performed, especially by a young and interesting Angela Lansbury, who plays the parlor maid, Nancy. Joseph Cotten, on the other hand, seems to be out of character as Brian Cameron. His American accent ruins his appearance and we don't believe in him. Dame May Witty is about the sunniest one in this film.

"Gaslight" is an excellent way to spend the time in the company of Ingrid Bergman and Charles Boyer, thanks to the detailed production directed by George Cukor.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Italian

Release Date:

30 October 1944 (Sweden) See more »

Also Known As:

Gaslight See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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