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The Falcon in Hollywood (1944)

Approved | | Crime, Mystery, Drama | 8 December 1944 (USA)
The Falcon investigates the murder of an actor on a Hollywood backlot.

Director:

Gordon Douglas

Writers:

Gerald Geraghty (screenplay), Michael Arlen (based upon the character created by)
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Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Tom Conway ... Tom Lawrence
Barbara Hale ... Peggy Callahan
Veda Ann Borg ... Billie Atkins
John Abbott ... Martin S. Dwyer
Sheldon Leonard ... Louie Buchanan
Konstantin Shayne ... Alec Hoffman
Emory Parnell ... Inspector McBride
Frank Jenks ... Lieutenant Higgins
Jean Brooks ... Roxanna Miles
Rita Corday ... Lili D'Allio
Walter Soderling ... Ed Johnson - Gate Guard
Useff Ali Useff Ali ... Mohammed Nogari
Robert Clarke ... Perc Saunders - Assistant Director
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
George DeNormand ... Truck Driver (scenes deleted)
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Storyline

Vacationing in Hollywood doesn't free the Falcon from investigating murder. The victim is an actor whose fashion designer wife has been having an affair with a director. Written by Ed Stephan <stephan@cc.wwu.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Where next will the killer strike? See more »

Genres:

Crime | Mystery | Drama

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The motion picture studio seen in the film is in fact the old RKO studio lot, now part of Paramount Pictures studio lot. Despite the film having been made more than seventy years ago, a lot of the buildings on the lot are virtually unchanged. See more »

Goofs

When the murder holds a gun on the five main characters and dashes out of his office, he closes the door and then fires three shots through the door from the outside. One of the bullets smashes a bust of Shakespeare inside the office, but we see NO holes appear in the door while we hear the three shots. And yet, when the camera cuts away from the smashed bust and back to the closed door, suddenly it DOES have three bullet holes surrounded by splintered wood. See more »

Quotes

Louie Buchanan: [with menace] You see too much - you think too much - and you breathe too much...
Tom Lawrence: [helpfully] Yeah, and bet too much on the wrong horses.
See more »

Connections

Follows The Falcon and the Co-eds (1943) See more »

Soundtracks

Palomita Mia
(uncredited)
Music by Aaron González
See more »

User Reviews

The Falcon on the backlot - RKO Glory Days of "B's"
19 June 2002 | by jean-13See all my reviews

A great tour of the RKO backlot. Tom Conway suave as ever gives us a turn around the streets of 1940's Hollywood, including a trip to the Hollywood Bowl. Barbara (Della Street) Hale is on hand again as are the fabulous Sheldon Leonard and Robert Clark(I) in his second film role. Veda Ann Borg is brash and funny, Konstantin Shayne mutter Shakespeare with panache, and Jean Brooks(II) adds her charm to an early send up of Edith Head. And take a look at that lovely underrated under used Rita Corday. It all starts at the Hollywood race track, a mad dash around street cars down the Boulevard and ending up at the RKO gate. Prop rooms, prop building, soundstages, costume shop, the RKO stock swimming pool and finally the loft of the soundstage. It's fast, funny and an exceptional tour of a working studio. There is even a charming Arab actor Useff Ali as the "I can play any ethnic" in what is only one of his two film roles. Too bad he didn't have a longer career.

The B pics at RKO had a great family of ensemble players..........Enjoy them.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

8 December 1944 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Falcon in Hollywood See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

RKO Radio Pictures See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound System)

Color:

Black and White (archive footage)| Black and White

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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