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Arsenic and Old Lace (1944) Poster

Trivia

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Cary Grant's (birth name), Archie Leach appears on a tombstone in the cemetery near the Brewster's house. In Grant's earlier picture, His Girl Friday (1940), his character, Walter, responded to a threat by saying 'listen, the last man that said that to me was Archie Leach, just a week before he cut his throat'. As a gag, the 'departed' Mr. Leach was apparently interred in the Brooklyn cemetery by the Brewster's home.
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Cary Grant considered his acting in this film to be horribly over the top and often called it his least favorite of all his movies.
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According to Dear Boris biographer Cynthia Lindsay, Josephine Hull and Jean Adair went to their graves believing that Boris Karloff had been so saintly as to agree to let them go to Hollywood to make this film while he stayed on Broadway doing the play. Nothing could have been further from the truth: Karloff was very angry and disappointed that he was the only play cast member not allowed out of his contract to do the film.
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Some 20 years before this movie, actress Jean Adair had helped nurse a very ill vaudeville performer, named Archie Leach back to health. When she was asked to reprise her Broadway Arsenic and Old Lace role as Aunt Martha for this film, Adair and Leach ( now known as Cary Grant) were old friends.
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On stage, Boris Karloff played the monstrous Jonathan Brewster, Raymond Massey's film character, who, in eerie-looking screen makeup, resembled Karloff, which was a running gag throughout the film. Karloff eagerly wanted to do this film, but he was kept under contract by the Broadway play producers and wasn't allowed to do the picture, to his immense displeasure (almost 2 decades later, he did get a chance; in the TV version, Arsenic & Old Lace (1962), his 'wish' (?) came true).
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The Production Code Administration asked filmmakers to tone down the "sex frustration" of the newlywed Elaine and Mortimer. While the eagerness of the newlyweds is apparent in the final cut of the film, the filmmakers complied with the PCA and minimized the couple's "frustration" in several scenes.
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Amy Archer-Gilligan, Americas most prolific female serial killer, has been cited as the inspiration for the story. She was charged with the poisoning deaths of her two husbands and was allegedly responsible for the deaths of 66 other elderly "inmates" of her nursing home. Her weapon of choice? Arsenic.
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Frank Capra noted that while he was stationed in London in January 1943, he overheard American and British soldiers screaming "Charge!" in the manner of the "Teddy Roosevelt" character and deduced that they had seen the film. He then learned that Jack L. Warner had released the picture to the armed forces that month, a year after it was completed, and almost two years before it was released to the general public.
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At the time of production, Warner Bros. announced that the Brewster house was the largest set ever built at the studio. The house was complete, room by room, in every detail. Production records confirm that several scenes were shot in various rooms of the Brewster house (Mortimer's grandfather's study, the aunts' bedroom, and the cellar) were filmed, but not included in the final cut of the film.
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In an early example of aggressive product placement, the Bell Company provided the film with their new model - the 'French' telephone (which had both a microphone and ear piece in the same unit) in order to achieve greater advertising.
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Frank Capra was forced to pay $25,000 apiece to the Broadway play's producers for their loaning Jean Adair and Josephine Hull to the film.
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Frank Capra pushed his actors to the broadest comedy takes, a fact that did not sit well with Cary Grant. As a result, his (and Jack Carson's) performances were singled out by reviewers for going dangerously over the top, while Raymond Massey and the stage performers managed to look rather restrained by comparison. Grant hated working this way, although in his more generous moments he credited Capra with helping him to get the comic effect he was unable to do on his own (it may have been his subtle way of blaming the director).
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Frank Capra related to the role of Mortimer, in the film, because, like that character, he also had an older brother who abused him as a child and grew to be a criminal.
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On December 12, 1941, with less than a week to go before filming ended, director, Frank Capra enlisted in the U.S Army Signal Corps, as a major. This was prompted by the attack on Pearl Harbor five days prior, and led to numerous Hollywood directors, cast and crew also enlisting,. He received an extension of his order to report for active duty in mid-January so he could finish editing the picture. He stayed to complete post production, and reported in on February 11, 1942. This would be his last (Hollywood) feature film until It's a Wonderful Life (1946).
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In line, with him being an actual (born in), New York city-ite, James Gleason (Lt Rooney) mispronounces Greenpoint (a neighborhood of Brooklyn), when he's talking to Mortimer (Cary Grant) as only a true New Yorker does, as 'Green prnt' (yes, the vowel-less spelling's exactly as the name's said).
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The Production Code Administration strongly recommended that the filmmakers limit the deadly concoction used by the Brewster sisters to simply arsenic (as it already appeared in the title) when the sisters tell Mortimer their recipe. The PCA was concerned that unstable audience members may try to replicate the recipe. Their suggestion was ignored without apparent consequence.
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Cary Grant eventually won the role of Mortimer Brewster because of his removal from Warner Bros.' production, The Man Who Came to Dinner (1942). Grant had been briefly cast as Sheridan Whiteside in that film, however, pressure from the theater, film industry, and the public for Monty Woolley to be cast instead led Grant to be ousted. This left one of Warner Bros.' most bankable stars with nothing to do. Since this film was getting ready to go into production, the studio insisted that Grant receive the role of Mortimer Brewster.
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Cary Grant later said in interviews that his role would have been better accomplished by Allyn Joslyn, the Broadway play's lead, or even by James Stewart.
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To add to the funny-creepy mood, Frank Capra ordered a backdrop with wispy clouds in front of a full moon and countless bags of autumn leaves blown around the exterior house and cemetery sets by three wind machines.
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Warner Bros. suggested that Humphrey Bogart could replace Boris Karloff on Broadway, paving the way for Karloff to appear in this film with minimal impact to the play's popularity. The Broadway producers, however, refused the suggestion and jealously guarded Karloff's commitment to the play.
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There are several allusions to the biographies of US Presidents, most obviously Theodore Roosevelt. Jonathan's line "He wouldn't have died of pneumonia if I hadn't shot him" seems to be an allusion to James A. Garfield's death from pneumonia after being shot by Charles J. Guiteau in 1881.
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The Broadway play opened January 10, 1941. The film was shot between October 20 and December 16, 1941 while the play was still running, with most of the play's cast playing their roles in the movie. Editing on the film was completed by Capra in January 1942, followed by some post production work in February, when the film was ready for release. However, Warner Brothers had been contractually required to wait for the play to finish its run before releasing the movie, and as the subject matter had a particularly macabre theme, prompted as well by obvious Halloween references, it was hoped that the play would have finished for an October 1942 release. By January 1943, the play was still running domestically, so Warner got permission to show it to the U.S. Armed Forces who were stationed on overseas bases during that month. When the play finally finished its Broadway run on June 17, 1944, it was decided to release it ahead of Halloween, receiving its token film debut on Broadway at the Strand Theatre on September 1, 1944, followed by the nationwide release on September 23, two and a half years after the film had been completed.
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Low key lighting was used throughout, to give the film its spooky Halloween tone.
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Boris Karloff did not abandon his commitment to the Broadway version of Arsenic and Old Lace in order to appear in this film. He did, however, graciously allow Warner Bros. to use his name and likeness, an issue that the studio had considered a potentially-devastating legal obstacle had he not done so.
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Frank Capra cut corners wherever he could and worked swiftly and cheaply to bring the picture in on budget and within its short shooting schedule. He later said production manager Steve Trilling asked him if he was "going back to your Poverty Row quickies" where he had started his career. Capra said, "Yes, for a refresher course."
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Although he planned to do the entire production on a single set, Frank Capra had to make exceptions for the scenes added to the story in the script adaptation: the baseball game, the marriage license office, and the sanitarium. For the most part though, Capra and cinematographer Sol Polito confined themselves to the set designed by art director Max Parker, following Capra's sketches. The house was constructed so they could shoot both interiors and exteriors in the same place.
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Included among the American Film Institute's 2000 list of the Top 100 Funniest American Movies.
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Although this film was made in late 1941, it was not released until September 1944 because of a contractual obligation between Warner Bros. and the producers of the Broadway show, in which Warner Bros. agreed not to release the film until the end of the stage play's run.
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There are conflicting reports about the size of Cary Grant's salary for the film and what he did with the money. Some sources claim that Grant earned $100,000 for the making of the picture and that he donated all of that money to the U.S. War Relief Fund. Other, perhaps more-credible sources, such as the Warner Bros. Studio archives, suggest that Grant received $160,000 for his efforts, of which $50,000 went to the Hollywood Division of the British War Relief Association of Southern California, $25,000 went to the American Red Cross, $25,000 went the United Service Organization, and $10,000 was paid to Grant's agent. Still other sources claim that Grant donated $100,000 of his salary to an unspecified wartime charity and kept the remainder of his salary (at least $60,000, if not more) for himself. Each of these sources are consistent on at least two main points: Grant earned $100,000 or more for making the film and donated at least $100,000 of his salary to Allied wartime charities.
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The Broadway comedy opened at the Fulton Theatre on January 10, 1941 and ran for 1,444 performances, more than one per day (counting matinees), closing on June 17, 1944. Repeating their stage roles in the movie were "Brewster siblings" Josephine Hull, Jean Adair and John Alexander, all three getting time off from the New York play. Boris Karloff was denied permission to go by the play's producers, fearing that the absence of their main star would adversely affect the play's attendance.
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The cast and crew noted that Cary Grant was frequently irritable during the making of this film. Grant complained constantly about the set, the props, and the wardrobe of the cast members. At one point he admitted he would rather have starred in a film version of Noël Coward's play, Blithe Spirit. Tensions increased following the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, which briefly shut down production. At least one theory about the cause of Grant's bitterness while doing the movie was that the costume designer, Orry-Kelly, was an ex-lover of Grant (they lived in New York together while they were two struggling immigrants in the 1920s), therefore Grant was wary of his presence on set.
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Julius Epstein thought Cary Grant mugged too much. He later said Frank Capra intended to go back and rein in the broadest scenes, but near the end of principal photography, the Japanese attacked the U.S. at Pearl Harbor and Capra was eager to move on to his military assignment, so retakes were never done.
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Ronald Reagan and Jack Benny were offered the role of Mortimer Brewster, but turned it down. Bob Hope was offered the part and was eager to do it but Paramount Pictures refused to loan him out to Warner Bros. for the project. Director Capra also considered Richard Travis for the role.
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The city backdrop was achieved with two-dimensional models of the Manhattan skyline and, in front of that, a foreshortened three-quarter-angle miniature of the Brooklyn Bridge. The tall buildings were covered with a scrim to make them appear farther off, and a glow was projected around the distant city. In front of the bridge were Brooklyn buildings, with a glow of lights in the windows, and still closer, the cemetery next to the Brewster home. From the front tombstone to the Manhattan skyline the 3-D perspective effect was done in 40 feet of studio space.
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Raymond Massey's makeup, which was the subject of much debate during the production, required two hours to apply and two hours to remove.
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Frank Capra preferred Andy Devine for the role of the delusional Teddy "Theodore Roosevelt" Brewster. The role eventually went to John Alexander, who received rave critical reviews for his performance.
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Screenwriter Julius J. Epstein complained to Frank Capra that Cary Grant's acting "was going overboard with the comedy." Capra agreed and told the writer that it would be toned down in the editing process. However, when World War II unexpectedly ensnared the USA, and Capra left the studio to do the "Why We Fight" series, it was not done.
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Frank Capra was drawn to this project due to its very frivolousness. Capra admitted that the films he had made over the previous seven years had all been serious endeavors with moralistic implications. He delighted in the film's escapism and pure, unpretentious entertainment value. Capra said that the film was "no great document to save the world, [and contained] no worries about whether John Doe should or should not jump; [it was] just good old fashioned theater." The director admitted that making the film was the first time he had really enjoyed himself since making It Happened One Night (1934).
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In none of his closeups does Raymond Massey ever blink.
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The murder cocktail is made of arsenic, cyanide, strychnine, and elderberry wine.
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For his role as Jonathan, Boris Karloff got top billing in the Broadway production. For this film version, Cary Grant got top billing for his role as Mortimer.
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Even in the setting of a large, forward thinking city like New York, showing people of different races and ethnicities at the marriage license bureau would have been considered daring at the time.
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The film actually took closer to eight weeks to shoot, not the four Frank Capra had planned, and the $400,000 initially budgeted was eventually set at just over a million, a far more realistic figure considering the salaries for Cary Grant and Capra alone.
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The hymnal that the aunts use to hold services over Mr. Hoskins is "Hymns For Creative Living." It was published in 1935 by The Judson Press. The hymn that they sing ("There is a Happy Place") is not in that hymnal.
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Interior scenes in the Brewster house (which comprised the majority of the film) were shot in sequence.
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According to Warner Bros. Studio records, Cary Grant received $160,000 for making the film, Frank Capra received $100,000, Raymond Massey's salary was set at $25,000, Peter Lorre earned $13,000, and Jean Adair and Josephine Hull both earned $10,000 for the making of the film.
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This marked the final major theatrical release in the career of Priscilla Lane. Lane later appeared in Fun on a Weekend (1947) and Bodyguard (1948), but neither were widely distributed nor did they have a nation-wide release.
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The rights to the play cost $175,000, and that theatrical producers Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse negotiated for 15% of the film's profits. Although the original projected release date of the film was September 30, 1942, the play had 1,444 performances and ran for over three and a half years, thus delaying considerably the film's release.
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Bob Hope was Frank Capra's first choice for the role of Mortimer Brewster. Hope was not available and Cary Grant was eventually cast in the role.
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Peter Lorre and Edward Everett Horton reprised their roles for the one-hour broadcast, The Best of Broadway: Arsenic and Old Lace (1955), with Boris Karloff as Jonathan.
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Hal B. Wallis outbid "every major film company" in February 1941 for the rights to the play.
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Warner Bros. borrowed Cary Grant from Columbia for the production.
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Throughout the film, the grandfather clock below the staircase (the minute hand of which always drops to the '6' position when "Teddy Roosevelt"/Johan Alexander slams his door) keeps correct time, i.e. it advances in time with the action. This is an extremely uncommon feature in movies, where clocks usually are left to show whatever time someone happened to set them for).
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In an episode of This Is Your Life: Boris Karloff (1957) featuring Boris Karloff, he revealed that he was one of the investors for the stage version of Arsenic and Old Lace. As of 1957 (the date of the episode), he was still happily receiving royalties.
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The name Archie Leach would re-surface 40+ years later in the film, "A Fish Called Wanda."
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The sisters mention that the neighborhood has changed since the pennant, a reference to one of the many titles won by the Brooklyn Dodgers, whose game opens the film.
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Throughout most of the production, the script was being re-written by Julius J. Epstein and Philip G. Epstein.
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One of Frank Capra's mother's great talents was making elderberry wine, which becomes the murder weapon in this film.
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According to Frank Capra's autobiography, 'The Name Above the Title', Teddy's 'Da da da da da daaa, Charge!' before he goes up steps is the inspiration for the chant very familiar at baseball games.
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During the war, Boris Karloff, who had not been allowed to reprise his stage role for the movie, did get permission to continue his role in a performance of the play for an audience of GIs stationed in the South Pacific. During 1943, GIs stationed in Europe got permission to see the as-yet-unreleased movie.
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First film for actress Jean Wong, although Casablanca (1942) was released before this picture.
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Actor Edward Everett Horton's distinctive voice would become familiar to another generation, when he would narrate "Fractured Fairy Tales" on TV's animated "The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show."
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Edward McWade, Spencer Charters, and Edward McNamara all died in 1943-4, prior to the film's official release.
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Frank Capra planned the shoot for two cameras with one always attached to a Chapman 20-foot boom for crane and dolly shots and the other designed as "wild," to be set up anywhere.
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The film was not given Academy Award consideration for the fourteenth, fifteenth or sixteenth annual awards because of its 1944 release date.
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The harpsichord piece being played early on is Mozart's "Turkish March."
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Alberta Gary, Joan Leslie, Juanita Stark and Vera Lewis are in studio records/casting call lists for this movie, but they did not appear or were not identifiable.
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Despite being referred to several times and in humorous ways, the film title "Frankenstein" is never actually said.
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According to various sources, Julius J. Epstein and Philip G. Epstein adapted the screenplay "with help" from Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse.
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René Clair saw the Broadway production of Arsenic and Old Lace and approached the producers about directing the film. They then communicated Clair's interest to Warner Bros., but it is not known if the studio ever seriously considered Clair for the job.
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Cary Grant and James Gleason also shared screen time in The Bishop's Wife (1947).
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"Teddy Roosevelt" Brewster mentions the old U.S. inauguration date of March 4th. Interestingly enough, the first presidential inauguration to take place after the 20th Amendment (which moved the ceremony to January) was ratified was Roosevelt's relative, FDR.
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

Mortimer's repeated phrase at the end of the film declaring the secret of his birth was originally "I'm not a Brewster - I'm a bastard!" However, the censors demanded that it be changed, resulting in the phrase "I'm the son of a sea cook!"
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In the play, Mr. Witherspoon, the caretaker of Happydale Sanitarium, is himself poisoned with a glass of wine by the two aunts, but adverse reaction from preview audiences to the murder caused it to be dropped. However, Edward Everett Horton, who played Witherspoon in the movie, did pose for a publicity photograph with a glass of wine in his hand.
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