6.4/10
847
35 user 14 critic

The Sky's the Limit (1943)

Approved | | Comedy, Musical, Romance | 13 July 1943 (USA)
Flying Tiger Fred Atwell sneaks away from his famous squadron's personal appearance tour and goes incognito for several days of leave. He quickly falls for photographer Joan Manion, ... See full summary »

Director:

Edward H. Griffith

Writers:

Frank Fenton (original screenplay), Lynn Root (original screenplay)
Reviews
Nominated for 2 Oscars. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Fred Astaire ... Fred Atwell aka Fred Burton
Joan Leslie ... Joan Manion
Robert Benchley ... Phil Harriman
Robert Ryan ... Reginald Fenton
Elizabeth Patterson ... Mrs. Fisher
Marjorie Gateson ... Canteen Hostess
Freddie Slack ... Freddie Slack - Leader of His Orchestra
Freddie Slack and His Orchestra Freddie Slack and His Orchestra ... Freddie Slack's Orchestra
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Storyline

Flying Tiger Fred Atwell sneaks away from his famous squadron's personal appearance tour and goes incognito for several days of leave. He quickly falls for photographer Joan Manion, pursuing her in the guise of a carefree drifter. Written by Diana Hamilton <hamilton@gl.umbc.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Here's a thrill, new and gay! It's a dance filled holiday!

Genres:

Comedy | Musical | Romance | War

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The song "Hangin' on to You" was written for the film but not used. See more »

Goofs

Before entering Phil's office, Fred buys a golden delicious apple. When he enters the office, he has a red delicious apple. See more »

Quotes

Joan Manion: You know, purely in a sociological way, you interest me. A little.
Fred Atwell: Well, it's a beginning, isn't it?
Joan Manion: Don't get me wrong! What interests me is this passion you seem to have for having your picture taken.
Fred Atwell: Let's talk it over.
[to bartender]
Fred Atwell: I'll have the same, please.
Joan Manion: You know, I'm supposed to be taking pictures of celebrities.
Fred Atwell: Couldn't I be the fellow who never gets his name mentioned? The one they call 'a friend'? You know: 'Ginger Rogers - and friend.'
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Connections

Featured in Great Performances: The Fred Astaire Songbook (1991) See more »

Soundtracks

Cuban Sugar Mill
(uncredited)
Written by Freddie Slack
Danced by Fred Astaire
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User Reviews

 
Answering the call to duty
24 January 2001 | by dexter-10See all my reviews

Another of the many World War Two films which was intended to demonstrate that everyone had to answer the call to duty, even the wealthy. This one contains characters who find themselves in glamorous places with clever lines and works of classical art. They are into champagne and penthouses, and mandatory dance scenes on ballroom size terraces. There is, and can be, only one star in this film: Fred Astaire. The finest part is his song and dance routine, "One For The Road." This scene is a classic movie moment of which one never tires. When it comes to dancing, the sky is indeed the limit.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

13 July 1943 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Lookout Below See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

RKO Radio Pictures See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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