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My Learned Friend (1943)

Approved | | Comedy, Thriller | 25 October 1943 (UK)
An insane murderer is on the loose, and gunning for the men who put him away. Will Fitch is on the list, and co-opts Claude Babbington to try and stop him from meeting a grisly end.

Directors:

Basil Dearden, Will Hay

Writers:

Angus MacPhail (original screen play), John Dighton (original screen play)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Will Hay ... William Fitch
Claude Hulbert ... Claude Babbington
Mervyn Johns ... Grimshaw
Lawrence Hanray Lawrence Hanray ... Sir Norman (as Laurence Hanray)
Aubrey Mallalieu ... Magistrate
Charles Victor Charles Victor ... 'Safety' Wilson
Leslie Harcourt Leslie Harcourt ... Barman
Eddie Phillips Eddie Phillips ... 'Basher' Blake
G.H. Mulcaster G.H. Mulcaster ... Dr. Scudamore
Ernest Thesiger ... Ferris
Lloyd Pearson Lloyd Pearson ... Col. Chudleigh
Gibb McLaughlin ... Butler
Maudie Edwards Maudie Edwards ... Aladdin
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Storyline

An insane murderer is on the loose, and gunning for the men who put him away. Will Fitch is on the list, and co-opts Claude Babbington to try and stop him from meeting a grisly end. Written by D.Giddings <darren.giddings@newcastle.ac.uk>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Thriller

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Originally, the above film wasn't going to be Will Hay's last. A few years later, he planned another comedy with director Marcel Varnel. Unfortunately, due to the director being killed in a car crash and Will Hay suffering ill health, the project was canceled. See more »

Goofs

The synchronisation between the 'studio' car driven by Claude Babbington (Claude Hulbert) and the back projection does not match up, in that notwithstanding the bends in the road, his hands never move the steering wheel to follow the course of the road. See more »

Crazy Credits

Opening credits prologue: LONDON PRE-WAR See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Thirty Nine Steps (1978) See more »

Soundtracks

You do things to me
by Peter Noble
Sung by Maudie Edwards (uncredited)
See more »

User Reviews

 
Hay's Finest Hour
1 August 2007 | by fmrryanSee all my reviews

This is an excellent film in so many ways. I would argue Hay's best film, although it does not have the warmth of the earlier films, which are so much more "cosey". In fact this is quite dark and disturbing, perhaps too much so for some viewers. There are so many gems here, especially Hay's opening verbal sparring with the cynical, weary, seen it all, magistrate: Hay: "Well at least I leave this court without a stain on my character!". Magistrate: "Your Mummy and Daddy in heaven will be the best judge of that!" Comparable scenes ensue in the Coroner's Court, when Hay is astonished to hear an Old Bailey Judge described by a witness (so he mistakenly thinks) as one of the lads of the village. Safety Wilson and his den are marvellous, as is Hulbert throughout. Mervyn Johns is completely unhinged as Grimshaw and the scenes in the lunatic asylum are bizarre and disturbing. This is Hay comedy at its blackest and arguably most effective.


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

25 October 1943 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

My Learned Friend See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Ealing Studios See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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