6.9/10
759
21 user 6 critic

Millions Like Us (1943)

Not Rated | | Drama, War | 15 November 1943 (UK)
Categorised as a British World War II propaganda film this less known example is a superb work of morale-boosting films from mid World War 2. Well written and directed the film has a simple... See full summary »

Writers:

Frank Launder (an original screenplay written by), Sidney Gilliat (an original screenplay written by)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Patricia Roc ... Celia Crowson
Gordon Jackson ... Fred Blake
Anne Crawford ... Jennifer Knowles
Moore Marriott ... Jim crowson
Basil Radford ... Charters
Naunton Wayne ... Caldicott
Joy Shelton ... Phyllis Crowson
John Boxer John Boxer ... Tom
Valentine Dunn Valentine Dunn ... Elsie
Megs Jenkins ... Gwen Price
Terry Randall Terry Randall ... Annie
Amy Veness Amy Veness ... Mrs. Blythe
John Salew John Salew ... The Doctor
Beatrice Varley Beatrice Varley ... Miss Wells
Bertha Willmott Bertha Willmott ... The Singer
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Storyline

Categorised as a British World War II propaganda film this less known example is a superb work of morale-boosting films from mid World War 2. Well written and directed the film has a simple story line based around the many women conscripted into industrial factory work in support of the home front war effort. It has a cast of many great actresses and actors recognisable to fans of films from this era. With much of the film appearing to be digitally restored this process adds an amazing timeless quality to the faces, fashion, modest hair and make-up styling, which is delightful in itself making the characters appear almost contemporary. Written by Ron Howe

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | War

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

15 November 1943 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

Ceux de chez nous See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Gainsborough Pictures See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (BAF Sound System)

Color:

Black and White (archive footage in opening scenes)| Black and White

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The first film of Brenda Bruce. See more »

Goofs

Although Fred Blake (Gordon Jackson) is flight crew on a Short Stirling (the type of aircraft Celia makes parts for and which is seen being towed out of the factory), there are at least two shots of Fred's aircraft taking off/climbing which are actually an Avro Lancaster. See more »

Quotes

Ugly Youth: I've been here for 20 years but I don't feel I belong. I was born in Market Harborough.
See more »

Crazy Credits

[Credits for leading actors] -and millions like you- See more »

Connections

References The Young Mr. Pitt (1942) See more »

Soundtracks

Auld Lang Syne
(uncredited)
Traditional
Arranged by Louis Levy
See more »

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User Reviews

Much of this is just like it was
17 October 2004 | by jandesimpsonSee all my reviews

It was not until the invention of photography that we began to know what history was really like. Before that we had to rely on representations through art, writings and imaginings. But with the Crimean and American Civil War we could see the actual people who took part so that their suffering began to take on a poignancy that we never quite experienced from depictions of previous conflicts. Two dimensions were still missing that were to give records of history added immediacy, movement and sound. The first was in place to capture the cataclysmic events of World War I and the second was there to give the period of World War II a vividness that could be grasped by all future historians. As if to back up all that acreage of newsreel footage we have the feature films of the period often shown in the dead offpeak viewing times of morning and afternoon television to give us some idea of what people felt during what is rapidly becoming long ago. Although generally highly fictionalised they gave closeup substance to what in newsreels were extras in crowd scenes. As a boy who grew up in the '40's I feel equipped to vouch for those films of the period that conveyed something of the authenticity of what things were like then. I would rate "Millions Like Us" pretty highly in this respect. As a film it cannot compare with several others such as Carol Reed's "The Way Ahead" or Cavalcanti's "Went the Day Well". It lacks their sense of style, is often clumsy in continuity - the transition from peace to war is none too clearly presented - and has some unconvincing miniature mockups such as the oft repeated shot of a factory roofscape at night with toy searchlights beaming away in the background. Much of the photography has the amateurish look that afflicted much British cinema of the period, that the critic C.A. Lejeune once referred to as "like photographs from a plumbing catalogue". (Someone please let me know if I have got this wrong as I am quoting from vague memory). But in spite of these reservations it gets close to how people looked and spoke in those days, what their homes looked like and how they passed their time. It does it without recourse to caricatures of class stereotypes or sentimentality so that it remains one of the most honest films of its type. I have vivid memories of my mother working part-time in a munitions workshop just along the road from our house in Pinner. It wasn't a vast factory like the one in the film, more like a converted garage. I remember her making a part of a shell just like the ones that Patricia Roc, Anne Crawford and Megs Jenkins made. There was even a foreman figure dressed in the same type of overall as Eric Portman. For me those factory scenes in particular accurately represent a small part of our history.


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