The Leopard Man (1943) - News Poster

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Hangover Square

No, it’s not a the-day-after sequel to The Lost Weekend, but a class-act mystery-horror from 20th-Fox, at a time when the studio wasn’t keen on scare shows. John Brahm directs the ill-fated Laird Cregar as a mad musician . . . or, at least a musician driven mad by a perfidious femme fatale, Darryl Zanuck’s top glamour girl Linda Darnell.

Hangover Square

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1945 /B&W / 1:37 Academy / 77 min. / Street Date November 21, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Laird Cregar, Linda Darnell, George Sanders, Faye Marlowe, Glenn Langan, Alan Napier.

Cinematography: Joseph Lashelle

Film Editor: Harry Reynolds

Original Music: Bernard Herrmann

Written by Barré Lyndon

Produced by Robert Bassler

Directed by John Brahm

Here’s a serious quality upgrade for horror fans. Although technically a period murder thriller, as a horror film John Brahm’s tense Hangover Square betters its precursor The Lodger in almost every department. We don
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Turner Classic Movies Is Bringing The Horror In October

(Aotn) Turner Classic Movies is bringing the horror next month. Starting on October 1st the channel will be bringing back movies such as the original Cat People and Dracula. Fan’s of classic movies will surely not want to miss this.

If you have ever wanted to know where the band White Zombie got there name be sure to tune in on Halloween morning at 8:30 Am. The Universal Monster’s are sprinkled throughout this marathon and will hopefully delight old school horror fans.

Complete Schedule Below:

Sunday October 1, 2017

8:00 Pm Dracula (1931) 9:30 Pm Dracula’s Daughter (1936) 11:00 Pm Son Of Dracula (1943)

Monday October 2, 2017

12:30 Am Nosferatu (1922)

Tuesday October 3, 2017

8:00 Pm Frankenstein (1931) 9:30 Pm Bride Of Frankenstein (1935) 11:00 Pm The Mummy (1932)

Wednesday October 4, 2017

12:30 Am The Wolf Man (1941) 2:00 Am Island Of Lost Souls (1933) 3:30 Am The Black Cat (1934) 4:45 Am The Invisible Man (1933)

Sunday October 8, 2017

2:00 Am Night
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

Dark Aspects: Juliana Rojas & Marco Dutra Discuss "Good Manners"

  • MUBI
The Brazilian filmmakers Juliana Rojas and Marco Dutra have been working together for over a decade now. After an award-winning career in short films, their feature debut Hard Labor (2011) world premiered at Cannes Film Festival in the Un Certain Regard section. Following this, the two writer-directors pursued their solo careers, continuing to explore the genre of horror and musical. I interviewed the duo about their long-awaited reunion for their new film Good Manners (2017), which will have its world premiere as part of the International Competition at the 70th Locarno Film Festival.Notebook: The two of you have been working together for over a decade now. How do you understand the development of this long time partnership?We met in film school when we were at the end of our teens. What first brought us together was our common interest in musicals, fantasy and horror films. These are the kinds of
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Interview with Carlo Chatrian, the Locarno Film Festival's Artistic Director

This year Locarno International Film Festival celebrates its 70th anniversary. It is one of the most admired and respected film festivals in the world and historically a festival that has been combining tradition and innovation. We had the privilege to discuss some ideas on cinema, curatorship and festivals worldwide with its artistic director Carlo Chatrian, who has been running Locarno for 5 years now.Notebook: Can you share a few thoughts of what we can expect from the 70th edition of the Locarno Film Festival?Carlo Chatrian: Locarno reaches its 70th edition, but we do not want to make a simple celebration. Instead, we want to look ahead rather than look back to the great history of the festival. That's why we decided to have a special section called the Locarno70 which will show debut films that have premiered in Locarno all through its long history. For me, it’s a
See full article at MUBI »

23 Paces to Baker Street

No, not a blind Sherlock Holmes, but a blind Van Johnson, who directs his butler, his girlfriend Vera Miles and the London police to thwart a crime based on something he overheard in a bar. Henry Hathaway directs a complicated murder mystery that plays like a combo of Rear Window and Wait Until Dark, with a cranky Van Johnson as the central character.

23 Paces to Baker Street

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1956 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 103 min. / Street Date February 21, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Van Johnson, Vera Miles, Cecil Parker, Patricia Laffan, Maurice Denham, Estelle Winwood, Liam Redmond, Isobel Elsom, Martin Benson, Queenie Leonard.

Cinematography: Milton Krasner

Film Editor: James B. Clark

Original Music: Leigh Harline

Written by Nigel Balchin from the novel Warrant for X by Philip MacDonald

Produced by Henry Ephron

Directed by Henry Hathaway

In the 1950s the murder mystery thriller came of age, as creakier older formulas
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Journal (6.6.16 - 1.10.17)

  • MUBI
The latest installment in the filmmaker's series of journal-films combining iPhone footage and sounds and images from movies. A diary penned with cinema.Journal (6.6.16 - 1.10.17)feat. additional footage from Masha Tupitsyn and Isiah MedinaMy journal-film series (of which this is the third installment) came to be as a means of resolving the points of convergence and departure amongst the environments I occupy and those which I encounter in cinema. I like to view these films as a method of managing the images that take up my thoughts and memories into a new continuity, one in which the distinction between images seen on-screen and those personally experienced is no longer absolute. In dissolving this partition, these films provide a vector for the animation conceptual concerns through cinema - montage fulfilling that which language can only formally describe and vice versa. The following essay outlines some of the concerns this film attempts
See full article at MUBI »

Still Life: Fassbinder in ’74

  • MUBI
Ali: Fear Eats the Soul. Courtesy of Janus Film.On the occasion of a comprehensive retrospective the Tiff Bell Lightbox (October 28 - December 23), the need to summarize the thirty plus films of Rainer Werner Fassbinder seems not just daunting, but reductive. How to simplify someone who both evolved and contradicted himself? While typically turning out three films per year between 1966 and his death in 1982, the year 1974 seems like one of the German director’s most unified, at least in terms of one preoccupation: marriage. This particular year seems as possibly a mid-way between Fassbinder’s working out-the-kinks genre exercises (The American Soldier, Love Is Colder Than Death) and the later, lavish international co-productions based on esteemed literary works (Despair, Querelle). The diversity upon which the holy union is depicted can be detected if just judging by each of the three’s own source material; Ali: Fear Eats the Soul a
See full article at MUBI »

TCM Aids Halloween-Themed Fundraiser For Independent Detroit Theater

Call it grassroots marketing in the Motor City. TCM is lending its feed this weekend to a Halloween-themed fundraiser for the last independent theater left in the heart of Detroit.

Cinema Detroit is run by Paula Guthat, a movie buff and TCM enthusiast who created the “TCMParty” hashtag on Twitter in 2011. That started a periodic live-tweeting effort for a movie airing on the Turner cabler but has since evolved into an 24/7 conversation thread for vintage film fanatics.

Guthat and her husband, Tim Guthat, recently moved their Cinema Detroit operation to a new facility. The theater programs a mix of contemporary indie and arthouse titles along with vintage and cult-fave pics. But Cinema Detroit needs to buy new digital equipment in order to continue screening contemporary movies, which come with encryption that only runs on pricey Digital Cinema Initiatives-compliant equipment. Cinema Detroit launched a crowd funding effort to raise $50,000 to buy a new projector.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Films of Val Lewton: ‘The Leopard Man’ and ‘The Seventh Victim’

Val Lewton’s third horror film, The Leopard Man (1943) initially seemed promising. Based on Cornell Woolrich’s novel Black Alibi, it had more pedigree than Lewton’s previous movies. He reunited his previous team: director Jacques Tourneur, writer Ardel Wray, even Dynamite, the black leopard from Cat People. Forced again to film on the Rko lot, he sent Wray to photograph Santa Fe, New Mexico and crafted meticulous sets around her snapshots. Despite this attention to detail, The Leopard Man is one of Lewton’s weakest efforts.

The plot is simple enough. Nightclub entertainers James (Dennis O’Keefe) and Kiki (Jean Brooks) arrive in Santa Fe with a leopard in tow; Kiki’s rival Clo-Clo (Margo) scares the cat, which escapes into the city. The leopard kills a Mexican girl, sending the city into a panic. Several other women die, but James grows convinced that the leopard isn’t behind them.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The Forgotten: Carlos Hugo Christensen's "If I Should Die Before I Wake" (1952)

  • MUBI
1952's Si muero antes de despertar is adapted from a novella by William Irish, better known as Cornell Woolrich. Adapting the story to an Argentinian setting makes little difference, and in fact the added element of Catholic guilt perhaps darkens and intensifies the noir atmosphere. The poetic handling of this tale of murder and suspense, and the way a train blasts through the frame, strobe-lighting a frightened child, recall Val Lewton's production The Leopard Man, also set south of the border and also based on a Woolrich tale.Carlos Hugo Christensen had a particular liking for the film noir aesthetic and stories of shadowy deeds (the same year also saw him release a striking compendium film, No abras nunca esa puerta / Never Open That Door, based on two short stories by Woolrich). He brings expressionistic brio to the story of a truculent schoolboy who is sworn to secrecy by
See full article at MUBI »

The Robin Hood of El Dorado

Viewers expecting to see a lighthearted  'Cisco Kid' swashbuckler got a surprise with William Wellman's movie: it's a tragedy about a genuine historical California bandit who may have been an outlaw terrorist, avenging murderous discrimination against Mexican-Americans in the Gold Rush days. Hangings, rape and massacres -- not your average popcorn matinee fare for 1936. The Robin Hood of El Dorado DVD-r The Warner Archive Collection 1936 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 85 min. / Street Date May 26, 2015 / available through the WBshop / 18.49  Starring Warner Baxter, Ann Loring, Bruce Cabot, Margo, J. Carrol Naish, Soledad Jimenez, Carlos De Valdez, Eric Linden, Edgar Kennedy, Charles Trowbridge, Harvey Stephens, Marc Lawrence. Cinematography Chester Lyons Film Editor Robert J. Kern Original Music Herbert Stothart Written by William A. Wellman, Joseph Calleia, Melvin Levy, from a book by Walter Noble Burns Produced by John W. Considine Jr. Directed by William A. Wellman

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

I'm always
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Tales From the Crypt’ Volume 1 The early days of the horror icon crawl back from the grave

Few comics sit at the intersection of “fan beloved,” “industry defining,” and “absolutely impossible to acquire” the way the EC Comics library does. For a while they almost felt like Comics’ very own Holy Grail. On one hand, you’ve got the Tales From The Crypt brand itself, which has left an indelible mark on pop culture with films, cable TV series, Saturday morning cartoons, and a line of revival graphic novels from Papercutz — a proud legacy, to be sure. But on the other hand, you enter into the more nebulous region of pop cultural osmosis, and it’s there that the legend of Bill Gaines’ little comic line that could grows to gargantuan levels. The baby boomers that ate his ghoulish “mags” up in the early ‘50s eventually grew into the genre fiction movers and shakers of the ‘70s and ‘80s — from cult directors like George Romero and Joe Dante,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Five Moments In Old-school Horror That Even Modern Fans Can Appreciate

If you’re a diehard horror fan, you no doubt recognize the strides that “classic” horror films took to get us where we are today. While these films are indeed respected, they are often considered hokey, now that the bar for our tolerance of fear has climbed so high in the last 85 or more years. Naturally, as we change as human beings, so do the fears and expectations of each passing generation, be it the result of advances in science, social norms or the general state of humanity. A great example, as much as I find the subtle shadow play and slow-burn dread of John Carpenter’s Halloween terrifying, younger folks may find Rob Zombie’s loose remake/revision to be a much more frightening and socially-relative film with its abrasive depiction of graphic violence. A quality horror film, and what is often recognized as a “classic”, is one that
See full article at Icons of Fright »

Remembering Actress Simon Part 2 - Deadly Sex Kitten Romanced Real-Life James Bond 'Inspiration'

Simone Simon in 'La Bête Humaine' 1938: Jean Renoir's film noir (photo: Jean Gabin and Simone Simon in 'La Bête Humaine') (See previous post: "'Cat People' 1942 Actress Simone Simon Remembered.") In the late 1930s, with her Hollywood career stalled while facing competition at 20th Century-Fox from another French import, Annabella (later Tyrone Power's wife), Simone Simon returned to France. Once there, she reestablished herself as an actress to be reckoned with in Jean Renoir's La Bête Humaine. An updated version of Émile Zola's 1890 novel, La Bête Humaine is enveloped in a dark, brooding atmosphere not uncommon in pre-World War II French films. Known for their "poetic realism," examples from that era include Renoir's own The Lower Depths (1936), Julien Duvivier's La Belle Équipe (1936) and Pépé le Moko (1937), and particularly Marcel Carné's Port of Shadows (1938) and Daybreak (1939).[11] This thematic and
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

New on Video: ‘Out of the Past’

Out of the Past

Directed by Jacques Tourneur

Written by Daniel Mainwaring

USA, 1947

Director Jacques Tourneur knew how to make the most out of a little, particularly when he was working in collaboration with producer Val Lewton (see Cat People, 1942, I Walked with a Zombie, 1943, and The Leopard Man, 1943). So when Rko gave this master of the low-budget picture a comparatively larger budget and a top-notch screenplay (by Daniel Mainwaring—as Geoffrey Homes—based on his own novel, “Build My Gallows High”) the result was one of the finest of all film noir.

Starring Robert Mitchum as Jeff and Jane Greer as Kathie, Out of the Past is built on a premise that is one of the defining characteristics of noir: the inevitability of an inescapable past. Such a device was often integral, with the repercussions of one’s recent deeds coming back to haunt them, but relatively rare was
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31 Days of Horror: 100 Greatest Horror Films: Top 200

The hardest part about choosing my favourite horror films of all time, is deciding what stays and what goes. I started with a list that featured over 200 titles, and I think it took me more time to pick and choose between them, than it did to actually sit down and write each capsule review. In order to hold on to my sanity, I decided to not include short films, documentaries, television mini-series and animated films. I also had to draw the line at some point in deciding if certain movies should be considered horror or not. In such cases where I was split down the middle in deciding, I let IMDb be the judge for me. And in some cases, I’ve included these titles as special mentions. Long story short, I can’t include every movie I like, and I have to draw the line somewhere. With that said,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

A Look Back At: The Leopard Man!!

When you hear a title like “The Leopard Man“, it likely conjures images of the Syfy Channel’s bevy of science fiction schlock like monstrous snakes fighting mega alligators, Sharknados, mythical beasts and half-human half-whatever hybrids. The name definitely doesn’t suggest a film as sophisticated and expertly crafted as The Leopard Man truly is–the sensational title merely serves to arouse your interest and get you into the seats of the theater. Most directors wouldn’t have the ingenuity to avoid crafting a hokey literal vision of a title like that but Jacques Tourneur and Val Lewton were going to prove otherwise.

In the 1930s, even with The Great Depression going on, Universal Studios began banking big on their first leg of monster pictures, the fantastical black and white nightmares provided much-needed escape from the real devastation of the times. Hollywood had gotten a wake up call after the
See full article at Icons of Fright »

Exclusive: Paul Giamatti talks John Dies at the End and His Favorite Horror Movies

  • DailyDead
John Dies at the End will be released to theaters on January 25th and I recently had the opportunity to interview a number of people involved with the movie. I’ve already published my article with Don Coscarelli and next up is my interview with Paul Giamatti. Not only did we talk about his involvement in John Dies at the End as an actor and executive producer, but I also learned about his love of classic horror movies.

I recently watched John Dies at the End and loved how much it felt like a movie out of the 80′s. So many horror movies from that decade had a great mix of horror and comedy.

Paul Giamatti: I’m a fan of that kind of stuff too. This has a nice old school thing to it which is really good.

Many of our readers may not be aware that, on
See full article at DailyDead »

2011 Halloween TV: Movie marathons, episodes and specials

There are roughly a gazillion scary movie marathons happening on TV for Halloween 2011. Zap2it's got you covered for all your spooky programming. Be sure to check your local listings for times and channel.

All times Eastern.

Friday, Oct. 28

ABC Family: 13 Nights of Halloween, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m., "The Addams Family," "Addams Family Values."

AMC: Halloween movie marathon, 9 a.m. to midnight ("Buffy the Vampire Slayer," "House of Wax," "Scream 3," "From Dusk Till Dawn," "Flight of the Living Dead: Outbreak on a Plane," "Survival of the Dead," "The Walking Dead"

Bio: Scary movie documentaries, 8 p.m. to 4 a.m. the next day ("The Inside Story: The Silence of the Lambs," "The Inside Story: Halloween")

CBS: "CSI: NY" Halloween episode, 9 p.m.

Chiller: Halloween programming, 6 a.m. to midnight ("Twilight Zone" episodes, "The Daisy Chain," "Fingerprints," "Stevie," "Devil's Mercy," "Children of the Corn"), "Chiller 13" (The Decade's Scariest Movie Moments,
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Halloween on Turner Classic Movies!

Joe Dante runs down the TCM Halloween rundown!

Of all the available outlets for classic movies, TCM leads the (admittedly small) pack in variety, invention and print quality.

Still not nearly as widely available as it should be (try finding it on hotel televisions), the brand has nevertheless firmly carved an essential niche in the cable/satellite movie landscape, allowing owner Time Warner to maximize its vast library of vintage movies culled from numerous studio sources. In fact, Time Warner owns more titles than any other entity, and lately has been forthcoming with clever marketing ideas like the Warner Archive on-demand dvd service, which has been thankfully adopted by MGM, Sony, Fox and Universal. There are more titles available to the general public than ever before, often in pristine condition.

But to love a film you have to see it, and to see it you have to know it exists.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »
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