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For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943) Poster

Trivia

This film saved the famous love song "As Time Goes By" from being removed from Casablanca (1942). Ingrid Bergman began filming this movie immediately after completing "Casablanca". For this role, her hair was cut short. Meanwhile, for "Casablanca", Warner Brothers wanted to substitute another song for "As Time Goes By" and re-shoot some scenes with Bergman. However, since her hair had been cut, there would be a problem with continuity (even if Bergman wore a wig), so the idea was dropped.
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Ernest Hemingway insisted that Gary Cooper and Ingrid Bergman star in the film, despite the fact that Vera Zorina had already been cast as María and her hair had been cropped.
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When Ernest Hemingway told Ingrid Bergman she would have to cut off her hair for the role of Maria, she shot back, "To get that part, I'd cut my head off!" She would rehearse tirelessly until all hours of the night, begging to repeat a scene long after the director was satisfied.
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The book (and movie's title) is taken from John Donne's "Meditation XVII" from 1624: ..."No man is an island, entire of itself... any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind; and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee."
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Ernest Hemingway had Ingrid Bergman in mind as "Maria" while he was writing the novel "For Whom the Bell Tolls".
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Writer Dudley Nichols depoliticized the screenplay, removing all references to Gen. Francisco Franco, loyalists and Falangists. However, he did keep in one prophetic comment about how Germany and Italy were using Spain as target practice.
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At the film's conclusion, Gary Cooper's horse falls and breaks its leg. The only horse the crew could get to do the stunt was brown, but Cooper's horse throughout the film was gray. Rather than re-shoot much of the film, Cooper's brown stunt horse was painted gray.
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Ingrid Bergman's first color film.
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Ernest Hemingway's novel "For Whom the Bell Tolls" was a 1940 best-seller and reportedly was sold to Paramount Pictures for $100,000.
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Banned in Spain until 1978.
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According to Gary Cooper's daughter, Ernest Hemingway had Cooper in mind for the role of Robert Jordan even before he wrote the original novel.
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It took 24 weeks to shoot the film (July-October 1942). The first 12 weeks were shot at Sonora Pass in the Sierra Nevada, the last 12 weeks were shot at the Paramount Studio in California.
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Vera Zorina was to play Maria. When she was replaced by Ingrid Bergman, she threatened to sue Paramount, so they gave her a cash settlement.
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Only a handful of Spanish actors were used in the film.
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One of over 700 Paramount productions, filmed between 1929-49, which were sold to MCA/Universal in 1958 for television distribution, and have been owned and controlled by Universal ever since. It received its television premiere in San Francisco Monday 5 January 1959 on KPIX (Channel 5), launching the MCA/Paramount Library on that channel. It was broadcast in color, a rarity at that time, particularly for a CBS affiliated station, when color television was still in its infancy and vintage feature films rarely were granted that courtesy and expenditure. After this initial telecast, and its next one in Omaha 3 March 1959 on KETV (Channel 7), the film was withdrawn from television in deference to the forthcoming CBS Playhouse 90 production, highly publicized as the most ambitious television dramatic presentation of the season, to be broadcast in two parts, Thursday 12 March 1959 and Thursday 19 March 1959. The film's eventual widespread local television broadcasts resumed in Milwaukee 11 April 1959 on WITI (Channel 6), in Minneapolis 7 August 1959 on WTCN (Channel 11), in Johnstown 8 November 1959 on WJAC (Channel 6), in Toledo, in two parts, Monday-Tuesday 9-10 November 1959 on WTOL (Channel 11), in Grand Rapids 12 November 1959 on WOOD (Channel 8), in Asheville 15 November 1959 on WLOS (Channel 13), in Detroit 26 November 1959 on WJBK (Channel 2), in St. Louis 12 December 1959 on KMOX (Channel 4), in Philadelphia 25 June 1960 on WCAU (Channel 10), in Los Angeles 12 November 1960 on KNXT (Channel 2), in Chicago 17 February 1961 on WBBM (Channel 2), and, finally, in New York City 19 May 1961 on WCBS (Channel 2). Since color broadcasting was still in its infancy and limited to only a small number of high rated, mostly live programs, primarily on NBC and NBC affiliated stations, except for its initial telecast in San Francisco, all these film showings were all in B&W. Television viewers were not offered the opportunity to see vintage feature films in their original Technicolor until several years later. The DVD was first released by Universal 1 June 1999 and was re-released 19 May 2015. Cable TV viewers now also have the opportunity to watch it occasionally on Turner Classic Movies.
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Henry Fonda was considered for the role of Robert Jordan.
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For her role in this film, Katina Paxinou became the first actress to win Best Supporting Actress at the Academy Awards and the Golden Globe Awards.
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The first of three films in three successive years that were nominated for the Best Actress Oscar for Ingrid Bergman as well as Best Picture and Best Actor. The other two are: Gaslight (1944) and The Bells of St. Mary's (1945). Ingrid Bergman won Best Actress for Gaslight.
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"Lux Radio Theater" broadcast a 60-minute radio adaptation of the movie on Februray 12, 1945, with Ingrid Bergman, Gary Cooper and Akim Tamiroff reprising their film roles.
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Early in pre-production Paulette Goddard was tested for Maria.
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Katina Paxinou's Oscar winning performance in this film is her only Academy Award nomination.
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The only Best Picture Oscar nominee that year to be also nominated for Best Art Direction (Color).
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This movie appears in part in the first-season episode of Star Trek: Enterprise: Dear Doctor (2002)).
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The producers, Buddy DaSylva and Sam Wood and the director Sam Wood's second choice for Maria was Lenore Aubert had Bergman turned it down. DaSylva and Wood told Aubert they were either going to go with only Bergman because she was a big star or with Aubert who wasn't as well known yet the way Selznick and George Cukor did with Vivien Leigh who at the time " Gone With The Wind " was being cast was not as big a star as Joan Bennett, Jean Parker or Paulette Goddard.
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