An English village is occupied by disguised German paratroopers as an advance post for a planned invasion.

Director:

Alberto Cavalcanti (as Cavalcanti)

Writers:

Graham Greene (story), John Dighton (story and screenplay) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Leslie Banks ... Oliver Wilsford
C.V. France ... The Vicar
Valerie Taylor ... Nora
Marie Lohr ... Mrs. Fraser
Harry Fowler ... Young George
Norman Pierce Norman Pierce ... Jim Sturry
Frank Lawton ... Tom Sturry
Elizabeth Allan ... Peggy
Thora Hird ... Ivy
Muriel George ... Mrs. Collins
Patricia Hayes Patricia Hayes ... Daisy
Mervyn Johns ... Charlie Sims
Hilda Bayley Hilda Bayley ... Cousin Maud
Edward Rigby ... Bill Purvis
Johnnie Schofield Johnnie Schofield ... Joe Garbett (as Johnny Schofield)
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Storyline

The residents of a British village during WWII welcome a platoon of soldiers who are to be billeted with them. The trusting residents then discover that the soldiers are Germans who proceed to hold the village captive. Written by Steve Crook <steve@brainstorm.co.uk>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Acclaimed by Every Critic

Genres:

Thriller | War

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Mrs Collins' village store was specially constructed for the film in the village of Turville. See more »

Goofs

When Mrs. Collins delivers the telegram, the way she holds her handbag changes. See more »

Quotes

[Germans are firing at the Manor House]
Charles Sims, the church warder: Duck madam, duck.
Mrs Fraser: I am ducking.
See more »

Crazy Credits

(after credits) ... and men of The Gloucestershire Regiment By kind permission of The War Office See more »

Connections

Featured in TCM Guest Programmer: 20 Fan Programmers (2014) See more »

Soundtracks

There'll Always Be an England
(uncredited)
Written by Ross Parker & Hugh Charles
Heard on the radio after dinner at the Manor House
See more »

User Reviews

 
Superb British Propaganda Film
11 December 2002 | by glennwalsh44See all my reviews

I have only managed to see 'Went The Day Well' twice and it is an absolute gem, but one that probably wouldn't appeal to many people nowadays. The events are believable and I am sure this film was very effective as wartime propaganda. Superior to 'The Eagle Has Landed,' which definitely shares many elements, starting with the soldiers graves at the beginning of the films. Excellent stuff.


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English | German

Release Date:

28 June 1944 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Went the Day Well? See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$7,849, 22 May 2011

Gross USA:

$47,214

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$47,214
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Ealing Studios See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound System) (as RCA)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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