The Spoilers (1942) Poster

(1942)

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7/10
No fighting in here allowed unless it's over me.
Spikeopath9 October 2008
We are in Nome, Alaska, miner Roy Glennister (John Wayne) and his partner Dextry (Harry Carey), are forced to fight to save their gold claims from the crooked commissioner, Alexander McNamara (Randolph Scott). Backed by sultry saloon owner and entertainer Cherry Malotte (Marlene Dietrich), the team must overcome both the odds and suspect politicians in order to get their just deserts.

Rex Beach's novel has been adapted five times thus far, and it's not hard to see why because the story is as solid as it gets. This take on the source has a wonderful sense of fun and adventure oozing from it, the cast are uniformly great and the direction from Ray Enright is tight and unobtrusive. Some fine set pieces dot themselves throughout the picture, culminating in a right royal (and lengthy) punch up between Wayne & Scott. No overkilling or tediously ham sequences are here, this is simply an enjoyable Western achieving all it set out to achieve from the off. 7/10
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7/10
Double Entendres Abound!
bobbyatgloss22 July 2000
This movie's got a good enough plot that it's been made at least 4 times, so you know that part's covered. It's a good story that holds up and moves at a good pace. The cast of stars are caught at interesting times in their varying careers. Dietrich is riding the Destry saloon girl role in a carbon copy of the original that belabors a huge oversized Gibson-girl wig and multiple extraordinary outfits befitting Marlene "the star". She brings her distinctive charm to the role and has a tongue-in-cheek ball with the sexually loaded script, but her role has nothing extra-special or magical. John Wayne is full of swagger and charm and working his way up the ladder towards the title of big stud cowboy on campus. Randolph Scott is turning the corner of his career into Westerns also; abandoning those light comedy or milquestoast leading roles and showing a glimpse of the hardnose tough guy & questionably moral cowboy that he came to be in later career moves. This is the penultimate film for Richard Barthelmess and his role is a morose and bitter one that fits his personal situation of a star who had had his day in the sun and was ready to step-down. Kudos, big laughs and a robust round of applause to the best delivery, lines and most entertaining scenes which are all handled by Marlene's maid - Idabelle - played beautifully and naturally by Marietta Canty. She WILL have you laughing out loud! This film is chock full of sexual innuendo, lust-filled motivation and snide comments; all subtly and enjoyably delivered.
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7/10
Knock-Down, Drag-Out "Northern"
telegonus18 December 2001
The old Rex Beach chestnut, The Spoilers, has been filmed several times, from the early silent days to the Eisenhower fifties. A durable tale indeed. When the first version was made the Emperor Franz Josef was still on the throne in Austria. All versions feature the famous fight between McNamara and Glennister, that begins in a saloon and ends several miles down the street. Windows get shattered, tables and chairs fly through the air, and people gasp in horror.

This 1942 film, directed by the reliable Ray Enright, is actually genteel compared to the silent versions, and as much a vehicle for Marlene Dietrich as anything else. As she was riding the comeback trail, in the wake of her spectacular success in Destry Rides Again, she plays a saloon singer, which had become her specialty. A rousing "Northern" western, set in the days of the Alaskan Gold Rush (which was, incidentally, closer in historical time to the year this film was made than we are to World War II), The Spoilers has a fairly conventional plot about prospectors, claim-jumpers, and the various hangers-on, honest and crooked, that made mining towns like Nome so exciting,--and so dangerous.

Leading men Randoloph Scott and John Wayne make rugged adversaries, though I find Scott somewhat more appealing, which isn't supposed to be the case. Wayne is competent if a little anonymous here. The supporting cast includes the reliable Harry Carey, Richard Barthelmess, Samuel Hinds, and in a cameo (I'm not making this up), the poet, Robert Service, best known for "The Shooting Of Dan McGrew". I guess if you're going to cast a poet in a film like this you don't go for Edna St. Vincent Millay. Service is most appropriate casting.

The sets are quite good, and at times quite fancy; and the streets are muddy, though I seem to remember the earlier films as having a more realistic, dirty look, as Alaska here is cleaner and at least physically less forbidding than one might expect. As to the climactic fight, it is well enough done, and properly violent, though neither participant seems nearly so bloodied up as he ought to. Overall, the movie is satisfying, more routine than I expected, and yet a worthy entry in that fascinating sub-genre, the Gold Rush Western.
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8/10
"What You Win You Can Collect."
bkoganbing18 July 2004
This is the fourth of five filmed versions of Rex Beach's redoubtable northern classic and since it's the only one out on video, it's the one best known to movie audiences. The stalwart trio of Marlene Dietrich, Randolph Scott, and John Wayne head the cast in this story about gold miners losing their claims to con men and doing something about it.

Dietrich's Cherry Malotte is another version of the role she copyrighted in Destry Rides Again. And like in Pittsburgh, Randolph Scott and John Wayne have their hormones in overdrive.

Randolph Scott is the gold commissioner/conman Alex McNamara and it's the only time he ever played a thoroughgoing villain on the screen and he carries it off, but I prefer my Randolph Scott to be tough and heroic.

You need someone like Scott around because even though John Wayne's the good guy, he's just a little too sure of himself where Dietrich is concerned. Even though her heart's with the Duke, Marlene probably liked having Scott around.

Lots of slam bang action here, topped off by what some consider the most brutal movie fight in screen history. Its close rival in Pittsburgh also featured Wayne and Scott and this one is longer, but not as brutal as in Pittsburgh.

Nice cast of good supporting character actors and pay particular attention to Scott's companions in thievery, Samuel S. Hinds and Charles Halton.

With Randy Scott and the Duke and la Dietrich, how can you go wrong.
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Old Western Gold Yarn When the Law Was Illegal Works ***
edwagreen9 February 2006
Nice action picture marks "The Spoilers."

Taking place in Nome, Alaska, John Wayne and Harry Carey own a gold mine. Along comes the gold commissioner (Randolph Scott) and a judge who work together as crooks to swindle people out of their stakes.

Marlene Dietrich is along for the ride as a gambling dance-hall queen. Her role is very similar to that of "Destry Rides Again," which was made three years before this picture.

Naturally, the Scott and judge duo want to clip Wayne and Carry. The judge has a niece (Margaret Lindsay) who will not quite make that happen. We've got shoot 'em ups, bar room brawls and dynamite explosions. If that isn't enough, we have Richard Barthelmess as Dietrich's manager who kills the sheriff and tries to frame Wayne for the murder. Barthelmess loves Dietrich and Wayne is in the way. Not bad, 2 women falling for Wayne.

Nice action flick with the theme of watch out for the law. A typical western production that works.
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8/10
Wayne and Scott Brawl Highlights Classic !
cariart14 November 2000
Warning: Spoilers
'The Spoilers' may be the most often-filmed western, ever, yet it has been largely forgotten by today's moviegoers, which is a shame! This is a riproaring adventure yarn with claimjumpers, a sexy romantic triangle, loads of humor, and, to cap things off, the most spectacular fistfight in screen history!

The second of three Marlene Dietrich/John Wayne teamings (and Duke is third-billed, behind Dietrich and Randolph Scott!), the plot is simple; evil government 'agents' arrive in Alaska, steal goldminers' claims, until the miners finally take matters into their own hands! In the midst of all this is Wayne, who owns a mine with partner Harry Carey (who is wonderful, as always!) and has had a long-time 'relationship' with saloon-owner Dietrich. When a 'judge' arrives with a pretty daughter (Margaret Lindsay), Wayne's eye begins to wander, and Dietrich sees red! She flirts with handsome Scott, a gold commissioner who is new in town, and obviously smitten!

What isn't known is that Scott and the 'judge' (Samuel S. Hinds, who would one day play Jimmy Stewart's dad in 'It's a Wonderful Life'!) are in cahoots to steal gold claims. After a series of tragedies, however, Wayne figures things out (Dietrich had, long before!), and confronts Scott in the middle of Dietrich's saloon...and the 'fight to end all fights' begins!

You can hold up 'The Quiet Man', or 'Hard Times', or 'Any Which Way But Loose' as having epic brawls, but this one tops them all! We're talking shirts ripped to shreds, broken furniture and windows, rolling under horses and through the mud mayhem, here! If this were pro football, both Scott and Wayne would make the All-Madden Team, for sure! Wayne is the one still standing (barely) at fight's end, and Dietrich is his proud (and willing) prize!

This film may never make a 'Classic Westerns' list (other than mine!), but it is a VERY enjoyable tale that shouldn't be forgotten! If you love a good Western, particularly if you're a John Wayne fan, 'The Spoilers' is a MUST!
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9/10
The dialog is tops, Wayne rather subdued, and Randy Scott is a BAD GUY!
krdement14 July 2007
Warning: Spoilers
This Great Alaskan Western is absolutely fabulous. The dialog alone is worth seeing (yes, seeing) and hearing. The innuendo and double entendre are written beautifully and delivered with crackle. John Wayne is a rather rakish ladies' man and played with much less bravado than typified his later roles. That is wonderful and fun to watch. Yeah, Dietrich played a very similar character in Destry Rides Again, but here she is more sympathetic, and has killer dialog and wardrobe. Seeing Randolph Scott as a charismatic bad guy is also worth the price of admission.

Old silent star, Richard Barthelmess, delivers a nice performance, too, in his supporting role as Dietrich's spurned but loyal suitor and employee. His secretive character, Bronco, really is key. In more run-of-the-mill movies, spurned suitors always side with the bad guys in the mistaken belief that The Hero is their obstacle to happiness. (How predictable is that gambit?) With Bronco you always have that scenario in the back of your mind.

The best scenes all revolve around Dietrich, whether she is being sweet talked by Wayne or Scott. They are both charming, which also is rather unique. Usually the bad guy competitor for the affections of the leading lady in a Western is pretty transparently, well, bad. But Scott manages to make us believe that the law-biding front he maintains for the public is credible - at least to some, but not good ol' Marlene!

I always enjoy seeing Harry Carey in a movie, and this role is particularly neat, since he was one of Wayne's idols. In fact, Randy's cronies are terrific, too. If you are a fan of Westerns, this one is excellent.
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7/10
for what it is, it's very very good
MartinHafer22 April 2006
I like films like THE SPOILERS because they have absolutely no pretense about them. They are simple B-movie-type films with relatively simple plots and familiar actors but pack a lot of predictable but fun entertainment into them. Sure, since it's a John Wayne flick you KNOW that he will win in the end and you KNOW what to expect. And, for me, that's not a bad thing. I like a good old fashioned John Wayne flick like most of the ones he did in the 40s--good, solid, and entertaining. The only odd thing is that the Duke is billed 3rd when it is clearly his film. Top billing went to Marlena Dietrich--who at the time was the bigger star. However, her part is pretty flat and she clearly acts in support of Wayne. And, second billing went to Randolph Scott. But, once again he was clearly not the leading character but the villain. Now if all this doesn't make sense, you need to understand that although Wayne had made many films by 1942, most were B-movies and he still was only just becoming the break-out star he would so clearly be in just a few short years.

In addition to being a good old John Wayne flick (among his better ones of the 40s), the direction and plot are pretty good as well. A very good movie--nearly deserving a score of 8.
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8/10
I is getting' mighty tired pretending Eskimos are from Virginia.
lastliberal23 May 2007
The John Wayne Marathon continues into the 14th hour with a whole boatload of interesting characters in a story about the gold rush in Alaska.

Wayne gets third billing in this movie to Marlene Dietrich and Randolph Scott. Dietrich plays a jealous girlfriend and Scott is the new dude in town that is muscling in.

Margaret Lindsay plays the new girl in town after Wayne's heart. Harry Carey is Wayne's partner.

This is at least the 4th version of this story and it won't be the last. A tale of gold mining, claim jumping, saloon, muddy streets, brawls and fancy women will always be in style.

Hang on to your hat and enjoy another Wayne classic.
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8/10
Superior Version of the Rex Beach Classic
bsmith555223 August 2001
Warning: Spoilers
The 1942 version of "The Spoilers" is the fourth of five filmed versions of the classic tale of life in Nome, Alaska during the gold rush of 1900. The story centers around the miners and their battle with the claim jumpers and cheats..the "Spoilers" of the title.

The film seems to have been designed as a starring vehicle for Marlene Dietrich. She plays the saloon madame, Cherry Malotte as only Dietrich could play her. Her dialogue is full of double entendres and she looks as Marlene Dietrich should with nary a hair out of place. One of the major faults of this film is that the producers failed to include a sultry song or two for Marlene to sing as she had done in "Destry Rides Again" (1939).

The real stars of the film though, are John Wayne and Randolph Scott as miner Roy Glennister and Gold Commisssioner Alex McNamara respectively. Scott in a change of pace plays the villain this time and does so effectively. The weak link in the cast is, I'm sorry to say, Wayne. Wayne needed a strong director such as John Ford or Howard Hawks at this stage of his career. Director Ray Enright fails to get the kind of performance that they could has gotten out of the Duke. He was much better in "Pittsburgh" released the same year (with Dietrich and Scott again).

The highlight of the film is the knock down drag out fight between Scott and Wayne (and their stunt doubles). It is one of the best of its kind ever filmed. Their is also a spectacular train wreck and shootout with the bad guys as well. Unfortunately there are several scenes involving Marietta Camity as Dietrich's servant Adabelle that have racial overtones. In particular is the exchange between her and Wayne when he appears at Cherry's in blackface.

"The Spoilers" is blessed with an excellent supporting cast of seasoned veterans. The venerable Harry Carey appears as Wayne's partner Dextry who fires off several shots from his single shot rifle "Betsy" without reloading. Former silent screen idol, Richard Barthlemess (in his final film) is very good as Bronco a shady figure who frames Glennister for murder. Another silent screen favorite, William Farnum, who played the Glennister role in the 1914 version, plays the lawyer Wheaton. George Cleveland and Russell Simpson provide the comedy relief as a couple of miners and Margaret Lindsay and Samuel S. Hinds play Scott's cohorts. If you look close you will also see a number of "B" western veterans in bit parts. I spotted Bud Osborne as the Marshal, and Harry Woods, Gabby Hayes and Mickey Simpson as miners. And yes, that really is poet Robert W. Service playing himself in a brief cameo.

One can't help but notice the similarities between this film and Wayne's 1960 effort, "North to Alaska", however, I enjoy "The Spoilers" more and more each time that I watch it.
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10/10
Professional All The Way
herb_at_qedi23 January 2005
Warning: Spoilers
Professionally acted, directed, filmed, and well-written "Gold Rush" movie set the standard that others have copied but never topped. Dietrich is impeccable, actually better than her great performance in Destry Rides Again. Scott turns out to be surprisingly stretched with a touch of seldom-seen whimsy. Wayne, of course, take a role he is perfectly cast for, and makes it better still. Samuel S. Hinds and Harry Carey give standout performances among a uniformly excellent supporting cast. The stunt works and the fight scenes are enduring classics not soon forgotten.

In my humble opinion, the Spoilers should be considered as much of, or more of, an essential John Wayne classic performance and movie that must be seen by any fan or student of Wayne and his movies than other over-hyped films from later days, such as The Searchers and The Alamo. To watch it is to enjoy it.
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7/10
North To Alaska
Bucs196013 July 2007
Warning: Spoilers
This filming of the oft told Rex Beach tale is a knock down, drag 'em out, shoot 'em up story of a group of your favorite players, transported from the old West to the Alaska gold rush. And it is a whole bunch of fun.

You just can't beat the cast.....even to the small parts such as Russell Simpson as Flapjack and the consummate drunk Jack Norton as Skinner. Of course, the main characters, Wayne, Dietrich and Scott are the focal points which pull the story together. They are at their best with Dietrich as the sassy dance hall owner: Randolph Scott playing against type as a unapologetic scoundrel: and Margaret Lindsay,usually the sweet virginal type is also against type here as a schemer with a heart of gold (well, sort of).

But there is something about Richard Barthelmess that kept my attention. Here was an Oscar winner (The Patent Leather Kid), who was as big as they got during the silent era but just couldn't seem to make the transition to talkies (with the exception of "Only Angels Have Wings"). And I'm not sure why.....it wasn't his looks, his voice or his acting style. Maybe he just didn't age well (he was only 47 when this film was made but looked older). Whatever the case, he does a good job here but you know from the beginning that he has to die somewhere along the line.....and sure enough, he does.

The film includes one of the most famous fights scenes in movie history between Wayne and Scott (although the use of stunt doubles is pretty obvious). They brawl upstairs, downstairs, on the stairs, and out the door. It's a dandy. It's a rousing, good time film that is worth watching......I like it!!
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7/10
Inspired casting Warning: Spoilers
One of the many good-but-not-great westerns (or would this be a "northern"?) that John Wayne made between *Stagecoach* and *Fort Apache*, *The Spoilers* has top-billed Marlene Dietrich more or less reprising her role from *Destry Rides Again* (they even play an instrumental version of "Little Joe" in the background of one scene).

But the truly inspired bit of casting is Randolph Scott as McNamara, the Mining Commissioner.

McNamara is established immediately as Wayne's rival in love and a little later as a business obstacle. Given the conventions of the genre, we would assume his villainy from the beginning...except, you know, it's *Randolph Scott*. I mean, that would be like...well, like making John Wayne the villain.

So when it turns out that he is the villain, it's a genuine surprise (for the longest time, I kept thinking that he'd have one of those Hollywood conversions right at the end and help Wayne to set things right before dying in a hail of gunfire).

And of course, Randolph Scott couldn't be expected to lose easily to some young whippersnapper named "Marion," so they were almost required to do the excellent brawl which ends the film.

(Another inspired piece of casting which I didn't know about until I looked it up is Robert W. Service playing Robert W. Service.)
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7/10
THE SPOILERS (Ray Enright, 1942) ***
Bunuel19768 December 2007
Warning: Spoilers
Rex Beach's Western tale was much filmed over the years – including twice during the Silent era, and an early Talkie version co-starring Gary Cooper; my brother had watched the 1955 color remake, which was O.K. but uninspired. This earlier adaptation, however, stands as a prime example of the genre from the more innocent pre-war era; in fact, starting from the year after – with William A. Wellman's THE OX-BOX INCIDENT (1943), to be exact – the Western achieved sudden maturity that would lead to any number of masterworks in various veins (noir, psychological, elegiac, revisionist) till it died out towards the late 1970s.

Anyway, this is a quite splendid film with all three stars (Marlene Dietrich, Randolph Scott and John Wayne) in good form; incidentally, all of them had just come from impressive individual work in the genre – DESTRY RIDES AGAIN (1939), Fritz Lang's WESTERN UNION (1941), and STAGECOACH (1939) respectively. Having preceded the film by the trio's subsequent (though lesser) teaming, PITTSBURGH (1942), it was interesting to see Wayne and Scott take turns playing the unsympathetic role (in the case of the latter here, he emerges to be an out-and-out villain – if a charming one, and to which he would return for his swan-song two decades later in Sam Peckinpah's RIDE THE HIGH COUNTRY [1962]). Incidentally, in both THE SPOILERS and PITTSBURGH, Scott is clearly depicted as being interested in Dietrich – but she seems to prefer Wayne (maybe because she did one other title with the latter, SEVEN SINNERS [1940], which is to follow).

The supporting cast is also quite strong: Richard Barthelmess and Harry Carey (both of whom had been stars in the Silent era and had since settled in character roles) appear as Dietrich and Wayne's sidekicks respectively – the former is shady and the latter hot-headed, and each prefers to settle arguments with a weapon (Barthelmess a flick-knife and Carey the shotgun he calls "Betsy"). Scott's gang of crooked associates is made up of Charles Halton, Samuel S. Hinds and, the latter's niece, Margaret Lindsay (who was intended to seduce Wayne for the benefit of their scheme, but ends up falling for him – the actress had been a leading lady of Warner Bros. pictures during the previous decade, but her poignant Other Woman role here is surprisingly well-written).

The compelling narrative extends to many an exciting (and, often, action-oriented) development – trial, bank robbery, jailbreak, train wreck, various instances where law officers face off or shoot it out with miners, and culminating in the famously brutal lengthy fistfight between the two male stars (though this is somewhat spoiled {sic} by the obvious use of doubles in longshots).
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5/10
Not a great Western, although an occasionally enjoyable one
JamesHitchcock4 February 2012
Warning: Spoilers
"The Spoilers" is set during the Nome Gold Rush of the late 1890s and early 1900s. It is, apparently, based upon a novel by one Rex Beach which has been filmed on four other occasions, although I have never seen any of those versions. The "spoilers" of the title are a gang of claim-jumpers who, with the assistance of a corrupt Gold Commissioner and an equally corrupt judge are plotting to defraud honest miners of their legitimate claims. The hero is Roy Glennister, a mine owner who leads the fight against the claim-jumpers with the assistance of a saloon owner named Cherry Malotte.

That sounds like the plot of a pretty standard Western; there are, for example, similarities with a film like "Duel at Silver Creek" from ten years later. In "The Spoilers", however, this standard Western plot is not taken altogether seriously but is generally played as a comedy. The gold-miners are generally crusty old characters with names like "Flapjack Sims" or "Bronco Kid Farrow". A serious film on this topic would doubtless have culminated with the bullet-riddled corpses of bad guys all lying on the ground after a climactic shoot-out, but instead the film ends with a spectacular saloon fistfight, and plenty of bruises but no fatal injuries.

When the film was recently shown on television, the TV listings billed it as a "John Wayne film", but when it was first released Wayne was billed third behind Marlene Dietrich and Randolph Scott, even though he has the leading male role, that of Glennister. (Scott plays the villainous commissioner McNamara). In 1942 Scott was still the bigger name, even after Wayne's success in "Stagecoach", but today it is Wayne who is a major icon of American culture whereas Scott, although a big-name star throughout his career, is remembered, except by film buffs, more for unproven rumours of a gay affair with Cary Grant than for his films.

Given the high regard in which Wayne is regarded today (for his acting, if not always for his politics), it seems strange to have to point out that he is actually the weak link in this film. Comedy, however, was never his strong point, and here he looks as though he would much rather have preferred to play Glennister as a straightforward action hero rather than having to play the whole thing for laughs. At least, however, "The Spoilers" is better than some of Wayne's other comedies from this period, such as the dire "A Man Betrayed" from the previous year and "A Lady Takes a Chance" from the following one.

Most of the other actors, however, throw themselves into the comedy with gusto, especially Dietrich as Cherry Malotte, essentially a reincarnation of her character from "Destry Rides Again", complete with guttural German accent. She also gets good support from Marietta Canty as Cherry's loyal black servant Idabelle, even if some of her lines, such as the one about having to pretend that Eskimos come from Virginia, tend to grate upon the ear in these politically correct days. That concluding fist-fight is a lot of fun too. Not a great Western, although an occasionally enjoyable one. 5/10
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8/10
Great performances by a very young looking John Wayne.
headhunter4629 November 2007
Warning: Spoilers
It was refreshing to see John Wayne looking so young and healthy. I hadn't seen any of his earlier movies in years. There is a great surrounding cast with the gorgeous and mysterious Marlene Dietrich, and the ever so calm and collected Randolph Scott. In this adventure Randolph plays a villain. Who would have thought it. He plays the part very well and is almost likable with his sophisticated charm as he attempts to devour all the gold mines with swindling "illegal" paperwork. But in the end his evil ways show through and he is undone by his own greed. But we want to see the good guys win, that's what makes for a great ending. And what a knock down, drag out fight it is. This is one of the best saloon brawls I have ever seen. The plot is straightforward and easily followed, with a plot twist or two to keep it interesting. The sets and props look real enough to convince one you are in Alaska. If you like any of the top ten listed actors/actresses you will enjoy this movie. I got my version from Netflix. It seems they are stocking up on some great older flicks for folks that don't need ten cars flying through the air or over the top special effects,to enjoy a movie. Look for it, enjoy it. I did
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6/10
Duke vs Scott
utgard1429 April 2014
John Wayne is a gold prospector who romances Marlene Dietrich and fights crooked Randolph Scott, who's out to steal both his claim and his woman. Strong cast in a fairly typical but enjoyable gold rush western. Dietrich sizzles. She has great chemistry with both Wayne and Scott. Lots of innuendo in her dialogue. For their parts, the two western stars are solid. Scott shines in a rare villainous role. His cohorts in crime in this one are, surprisingly, Samuel S. Hinds and pretty Margaret Lindsay. Duke is good. His climactic bar fight with Scott is the movie's highlight. Harry Carey plays Duke's friend. George Cleveland and Russell Simpson are fun as a couple of grizzled prospectors.
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7/10
A Good John Wayne Western
atlasmb25 April 2014
"The Spoilers" takes place in Nome, Alaska--where men are men and the women work in saloons. It's a two-fisted "western" about hardworking men who staked their claims to Yukon gold and those who tried to jump their claims.

John Wayne plays Roy Glennister, co-owner of a mine operation. Randolph Scott plays Alex McNamara, a man who works in the gold office and wants to stake his own claim to Glennister's girlfriend, Cherry (played by Marlene Dietrich). As owner of the town saloon, Cherry is a tough businesswoman with a soft spot for Glennister, who likes to keep things informal.

Much of the plot of this traditional western is predictable, but the action is nonstop and the story is engaging. It is also a parable of sorts about the difference between law and justice. This was not the first time this story was filmed and it wouldn't be the last. In 1955, "The Spoilers" hit the big screen again. But Wayne's version is more satisfying.
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9/10
Good stuff
SanteeFats11 June 2013
Warning: Spoilers
This is one of John Wayne's better movies. Harry Carey is good support as the older partner with the fiery temper. Randolph Scott appears as the bad guy of the movie which surprised me as I thought he always played good guys. The fight scene up and down the street between the two is pretty good. This entire scene was choreographed by the two of them and then they did the whole thing without stunt doubles. I have never understood Marlene Dietrich's draw as a sex symbol. She is not that appealing to me, but I was born after her hay day. Scott's character tries for a major gold mine grab with the help of a crooked almost judge. Of course this fails in the end and then that excellent fight scene pretty much closes the show.
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7/10
I Am Going To Get Me A Gold Mine
DKosty12311 November 2007
Warning: Spoilers
This is a story about gold mines in Alaska & claim jumping. This Rex Beach work was first done as silent movies in 1914, 1923. In 1930, Gary Cooper did it with sound. Then came this 1942 version which during the war took advantage of star power.

John Wayne & Marlene Deitrich & Randolph Scott are a love triangle & there is even another woman for Wayne to romance. Scott gets to play the heavy who along with a crooked judge try to ace Wayne & his partner out of their gold mine, The Midas. The other woman in Waynes life is part of the bad guys triangle, trying to lure Wayne into a trap. She utters the title line, "We're just spoilers." While I have not seen the other versions, plus 2 more done later in the 1950's, this one is stronger than your typical western because of the talented cast & the tremendous fist fight scene between Wayne & Scott which takes most of the last 10 minutes of the film.

This is the only time that this cast appears together in one film & fans of all three stars have reason to look at this film. It even presents a mild verbal cat fight between Waynes 2 women. Dietrich wins though her hero is pretty badly mauled in the final sequence. She runs a bar-casino in the movie & her tag line is "Anything you can win, you can collect." She says it twice in the movie, & like most movies of this era, you never see the winner collect, it is a stirring part of the imagination.
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9/10
Risque Banter.....
mattywoh29 April 2019
A short mention of a bar hall scene---

Full room of lively revel, John Wayne trying to keep up with the superb Dietrich---Randolph Scott's taking over the scene with the least lines--one of the all-time sexy-talk scenes, without as much as an inkling of a "nasty word"---sometimes just a single scene can make a movie unforgettable....
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10/10
Great Wayne Scott Smack Down
frank41223 April 2019
Super stars Marlene Dietrich, John Wayne, cantankerous partner Harry Carey, and villainous bureaucrat Randolph Scott head up a wonderful cast. Richard Barthelmess as the Bronco Kid gave it extra tension vying for Dietrich's affections. Did the honorable judge Samuel S. Hinds come to bring the law to a lawless land? If so his sidekick Charles Halton has his work cut out for him with all the claim jumpers. The wit and wisdom of Marietta Canty and many of the great character actors made this the best of the gold rush classics.
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7/10
Punchin' shootin' fun
timrossminister27 March 2019
John Wayne teams up with Marlene Dietrich & Randolph Scott once again in the same year they made Pittsburgh. Although Pittsburgh is a tougher, meatier story, The Spoilers is a whole lot more fun. You can begin to see Wayne's familiar acting style develop, and he has a much more commanding and convincing presence. Worth watching for a superb punch-up scene which ought to rank in the top ten punch-ups in cinema history.
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6/10
Shootouts on the street while everybody goes about their business.
mark.waltz14 December 2016
Warning: Spoilers
One of the racier post code movies is filled with insinuations, innuendos, sly winks at the audience and a bit of racist humor thanks to the presence of a seemingly wise servant who has the wit of a Gracie Allen character. It's set way up in Nome Alaska where fights over rights to gold mines are an every day occurrence. When the law tries to step in, they are greeted with gun violence and total opposition. Marlene Dietrich once again is a bar hostess as Cherry, more dressed up with high hair and fashions. John Wayne and Randolph Scott are the two men vying for her attention, and it's clear that she knows more than meets the mine.

The Rex Beach adventure novel already had an earlier version, and there would be even one more made just over a decade later. But because of the cast, this is probably the most well known version, adequately entertaining if a bit over the top. The emphasis in the script is based on sardonic humor, with much of it provided by Mariette Canty as Dietrich's dingbat black maid. Harry Carey, George Cleveland and Richard Barthelmess stand out in the supporting cast, with Margaret Lindsay a stark contrast to Dietrich. Great photography and atmosphere make this stand out. Dietrich and Wayne have decent chemistry while Scott makes an outstanding villain.

There's some issue with the character played by Canty, sassy but basically stupid, and a plot twist where Wayne disguises himself with blackface and enters Dietrich's bedroom, much to Canty's delight. Earlier she had made a comment about tired of pretending that the darker Eskimos were from the south, and here, she reacts to blackface as is if were an every day occurrence. It's ironic that over a decade later, she would play a much more dignified character that brought her some attention, the role of the loving housekeeper in "Rebel Without a Cause" that was the only source of love Sal Mineo's character had known. Here, she's told by Dietrich to sit on eggs and reacts as if she believed Dietrich was serious. The laughs are there, but come out uncomfortably. A great fight sequence ends the film, that is after you get a chance to see Wayne hiding inside one of Dietrich's feathery costumes.
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7/10
Nome, Alaska during the gold rush days
dfwesley12 December 2016
Warning: Spoilers
An entertaining film made possible by big stars, John Wayne, Marlene Dietrich, and Randolph Scott. It was difficult to get accustomed to seeing Scott in a villain's role or Samuel S. Hinds, either, for that matter. You kept waiting for them to turn into good guys a little later on. Now one can never remember Percy Halton ever playing anything else but evil, or a grouch, at least. The scene with the three of them plotting and scheming, took me by surprise.

Marlene Dietrich was her usual sultry self that we have come to expect. I hadn't seen Margaret Lindsay in a long while, and I appreciated her good looks and creditable performance.

Did you wonder how Harry Carey could fire that single shot flintlock so rapidly? I don't even recall him loading it either.

Included was one of the longest brawls you can imagine between Scott and Wayne. Scott was evidently knocked out but Wayne emerged bloody but happy in Dietrich's arms, as the film ended.
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