7.2/10
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167 user 64 critic

Saboteur (1942)

Passed | | Thriller, War | 24 April 1942 (USA)
A young man accused of sabotage goes on the lam to prove his innocence.

Director:

Alfred Hitchcock

Writers:

Peter Viertel (original screen play), Joan Harrison (original screen play) | 1 more credit »
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Popularity
784 ( 7,724)
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Priscilla Lane ... Patricia (Pat) Martin
Robert Cummings ... Barry Kane
Otto Kruger ... Charles Tobin
Alan Baxter ... Freeman
Clem Bevans ... Neilson
Norman Lloyd ... Frank Fry
Alma Kruger ... Mrs. Henrietta Sutton
Vaughan Glaser Vaughan Glaser ... Philip Martin aka Mr. Miller (as Vaughan Glazer)
Dorothy Peterson ... Mrs. Mason
Ian Wolfe ... Robert
Frances Carson ... Society Woman
Murray Alper ... Truck Driver
Kathryn Adams ... Mrs. Brown -- Young Mother
Pedro de Cordoba ... Bones - Circus Troupe
Billy Curtis ... Midget - Circus Troupe
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Storyline

Los Angeles aircraft worker Barry Kane evades arrest after he is unjustly accused of sabotage. Following leads, he travels across the country to New York City trying to clear his name by exposing a gang of fascist-supporting saboteurs led by apparently respectable Charles Tobin. Along the way, he involves Pat Martin, eventually preventing another major act of sabotage. They finally catch up with Frank Fry, the man who actually committed the act of sabotage at the aircraft factory. Written by alfiehitchie

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Unmasking the man behind your back! See more »

Genres:

Thriller | War

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

To achieve the sensation of the people at the ship launch being thrown up in the air during the explosion on the dock, Sir Alfred Hitchcock had the cameras pan quickly down each of the extras, from head to toe, and cut them together quickly. See more »

Goofs

When Barry Kane is talking to Tobin at Tobin's ranch, Barry lights a pipe with both hands but the next shot shows the pipe only in his right hand. See more »

Quotes

Mr. Freeman: The most important thing is to make sure of everyone around us.
Charles Tobin: Mr. Kane?
Mr. Freeman: I'm just not sure. I want to know that he's all right.
Charles Tobin: All right? What an understatement. He's much more than that! He's noble and fine and pure... So he pays the penalty that the noble and the fine and the pure must pay in this world: he's misjudged by everyone.
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Crazy Credits

Rather than finishing with "The End", the word "Finis" appears. This is perhaps an allusion to the fall of France, which is referred to in Pat's conversation with Fry inside the Statue of Liberty. See more »

Connections

Featured in Nostalgia Critic: X-Men (2019) See more »

Soundtracks

Tonight We Love
(uncredited)
Music from "Piano Concerto in B Flat Minor" by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Music adapted by Freddy Martin and Ray Austin
Lyrics by Bobby Worth
Sung by the men in the car
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User Reviews

Swiss-cheese Hitchcock
31 March 2001 | by jayson-4See all my reviews

For all its gloss and signature moments, this is surely among the dopiest of Hitchcock's American films. The fault lies not with the production design (slick, often striking) or the actors (the usually marzipan Robert Cummings is surprisingly credible), but with a script so preachy and unmoored that it sounds like it was written by the Minister of Propaganda during a helium overdose.

Even the editing-usually one of the glories of a Hitchcock film-is surprisingly sloppy. Example: The Cummings character is locked in a pantry of a Manhattan mansion. He cleverly melts a sprinkler head (his captors apparently having thought nothing of leaving him with matches and other mischief-making devices) and sets off the house's alarm system. There follows much scurrying among the servants, and the next thing we know, Cummings is out on the street in the crowd observing the `fire'. We can guess how he got there, but it's still as if he were teleported, and it's a cheat.

Some of the setpieces (the meeting with the handsome, refined `model citizen' who turns out to be Corruption itself, for example) are themes Hitchcock explored again and again, usually to better effect. And one encounter-with a kindly, effusive blind man in a remote cabin-is straight out of Bride of Frankenstein. Now that is one strange antecedent.

Still, there are rewards, chief among them the black-comedy shootout in Radio City Music Hall and, of course, the dazzling confrontation at the Statue of Liberty. And then there's Norman Lloyd's saboteur, surely one of the grandest creeps Hitchcock ever conjured.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

24 April 1942 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Saboteur See more »

Filming Locations:

Owens Lake, California, USA See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(copyright length)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

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